Mick Herron

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Mick Herron (born 11 July 1963) is a British mystery and thriller novelist, winner of the Crime Writers' Association 2013 Gold Dagger award for Dead Lions.

Mick Herron at St Cecilia's Hall, Edinburgh

Early life[edit]

Herron was born in Newcastle upon Tyne, England, and educated at Balliol College, Oxford, where he earned a degree in English.[1][2][3]

Career[edit]

In 2003, he published his first novel, Down Cemetery Road. It was the first volume in a series about Zoë Boehm, an Oxford private detective.

Location of the fictional Slough House (Aldersgate Street, London)

In 2010, with Slow Horses, he began a spy series, entitled Slough House, featuring MI5 agents who have been exiled from the mainstream for various offences. With the second volume in this series, Dead Lions, published in 2013, he won the Crime Writers' Association 2013 Gold Dagger award.[2] Herron has stated that the lead character, Jackson Lamb, was influenced by Reginald Hill's Andy Dalziel.[4][5]

Slow Horses was published by Constable in 2010, but the firm declined the opportunity to publish the next book in the series in the United Kingdom due to disappointing sales of its predecessor. Soho published the Slough House novels in the United States, and John Murray started republishing the series in the UK from 2015.[6]

His short stories are regularly published in Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine and are collected in the book, All the Livelong Day, published in 2013.

Bibliography[edit]

Zoë Boehm series[edit]

  • Down Cemetery Road (2003)
  • The Last Voice You Hear (2004)
  • Why We Die (2006)
  • Smoke and Whispers (2009)

The Slough House series (Jackson Lamb)[edit]

  • Slow Horses (2010)
  • Dead Lions (2013)
  • The List (2015 novella)
  • Real Tigers (2016)
  • Spook Street (2017)[7]
  • London Rules (2018)
  • The Drop (US title: "The Marylebone Drop") (2018 novella)
  • Joe Country (2019)
  • The Catch (2020 novella)
  • Slough House (2021)
  • Bad Actors (2022)

Stand alone novels[edit]

  • Reconstruction (2008)
  • Nobody Walks (2015)
  • This Is What Happened (2018)

Although not part of the Slough House series, Nobody Walks uses some of the same characters, and in story terms comes after The List and before Spook Street.

Adaptations[edit]

Slow Horses, Herron's first novel in the Slough House series, has been adapted as a limited series for television as Slow Horses.[3]

Awards[edit]

  • Dolphin Junction
    • Joint winner, Ellery Queen Readers Award 2009
  • Slow Horses
    • Longlisted for Ian Fleming Steel Dagger Award 2010
  • Dead Lions
    • Shortlisted for Barry Award 2014, for best thriller
    • Shortlisted for Macavity Prize, 2014, for best novel
    • Winner, CWA Gold Dagger for Best Crime Novel 2013
    • Winner, Palle Rosencrantz Award 2020
  • Nobody Walks
    • Shortlisted for Ian Fleming Steel Dagger Award 2015
  • Real Tigers
  • Spook Street
    • Shortlisted for CWA Gold Dagger for Best Crime Novel 2017
    • Winner, Ian Fleming Steel Dagger Award 2017, Spook Street
    • Shortlisted, British Book Awards, Crime and Thriller Book of the Year 2018
    • Shortlisted for Barry Award 2018, for best thriller
    • Shortlisted, Theakston's Old Peculier Crime Novel of the Year 2018
    • Winner, Last Laugh Award, 2018
  • London Rules
    • Shortlisted for CWA Gold Dagger for Best Crime Novel 2018
    • Shortlisted for Ian Fleming Steel Dagger Award 2018
    • Shortlisted, Last Laugh Award, 2019
    • Shortlisted for Barry Award 2019, for best thriller
    • Shortlisted, Theakston's Old Peculier Crime Novel of the Year 2019
    • Winner, Capital Crime Best Thriller Award 2019
  • Joe Country
    • Shortlisted, Theakston's Old Peculier Crime Novel of the Year 2020[8]
    • Shortlisted for CWA Gold Dagger for Best Crime Novel 2020[9]

Personal life[edit]

Herron lives in Oxford.[2] He enjoys playing squash.[10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Mick Herron (Author of Slow Horses)". Goodreads.com. Retrieved 2016-12-18.
  2. ^ a b c "Dead Lions — The Crime Writers' Association". Thecwa.co.uk. Retrieved 2016-12-18.
  3. ^ a b Higgins, Charlotte (2021-01-15). "Mick Herron: 'I look at Jackson Lamb and think: My God, did I write that? My mother reads this stuff!'". The Guardian. Retrieved 2021-02-01.
  4. ^ Mick Herron. "Crime writer Mick Herron: 'I don't know my hero's backstory yet' | Books". The Guardian. Retrieved 2016-12-18.
  5. ^ "If you read one spy novel this year, read Real Tigers". Spectator.co.uk. Retrieved 2016-12-18.
  6. ^ Nicol, Patricia (4 February 2018). "the UK's new spy master". The Sunday Times. London. pp. 20–21.
  7. ^ "Mick Herron". Mick Herron. Retrieved 2016-12-18.
  8. ^ "Harper, McKinty shortlisted for Theakston Old Peculier crime award". Books+Publishing. 2020-06-15. Retrieved 2020-07-27.
  9. ^ "Robotham shortlisted for CWA Gold Dagger". Books+Publishing. 2020-08-14. Retrieved 2020-08-16.
  10. ^ "10 Questions with Mick Herron |". Ethanjonesbooks.wordpress.com. 2013-05-07. Archived from the original on 2018-03-30. Retrieved 2016-12-18.

External links[edit]