Mickey Fondozzi

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Mickey Fondozzi
Mickey Fondozzi Punisher.png
Mickey Fondozzi in Marvel Knights Vol. 1, #10 (April 2001)
Art by Eduardo Barreto
Publication information
Publisher Marvel Comics
First appearance The Punisher War Zone Vol. 1, #1 (March 1992)
Created by Chuck Dixon
John Romita Jr.
In-story information
Full name Mickey Fondozzi
Species Human
Place of origin Earth
Partnerships Punisher
Microchip
Supporting character of Punisher
Notable aliases Number Eight[1]

Mickey Fondozzi is a fictional character, and ally of the Marvel Comics antihero the Punisher.[2] He was created by Chuck Dixon and John Romita Jr., and first appeared in The Punisher War Zone Vol. 1, #1 (March 1992).

Publication history[edit]

The character made his inaugural appearance in The Punisher War Zone Vol. 1, #1-6, and was also present in #9-10, #23, #31, #41, and both of The Punisher War Zone Annuals. Fondozzi's appearances in other titles include The Punisher War Journal Vol. 1, #45-47, #60-61, #64, #68, and #78-79, The Punisher Vol. 2, #86, #97-100, and #102-104, The Punisher Summer Special #4, and Marvel Knights Vol. 1, #5 and #10-11.

Fictional character biography[edit]

A career criminal living in Sheepshead Bay,[3] Mickey claims to be Italian, but is in fact Armenian.[4]

While robbing a Chinese restaurant where Triad money is being held, Mickey and his gang are attacked by the Punisher, who guns down all of the thieves save Mickey. Via psychological torture, the Punisher coerces Mickey into sponsoring him (under the alias "Johnny Tower") for membership in the Carbones, a Brooklyn crime family.[4][5] When Salvatore, the younger brother of the head of the Carbones, becomes suspicious of Mickey and "Johnny" the two frame him for disloyalty, and are given permission to kill him by Salvatore's brother, Julius. The attempt on Salvatore's life goes awry, and ends with him falling through the ice of a frozen lake, where he is later found by the authorities, who admit him to a hospital as a John Doe.[6]

Mickey and the Punisher's identities as saboteurs are later discovered by Julius, who orders their execution, though the two are saved by Shotgun.[7][8] The Punisher allows Mickey to live, on the condition that he become an informant for him, after Mickey helps him and Shotgun massacre the Carbones and the European syndicate that the Carbones had planned on uniting with on La Isla de Tiburones Durmientes.[9]

Mickey begins smuggling cigarettes in DeKalb, but his operation is shut down by the Punisher, who has Mickey assist Microchip with spying on the high-level criminals who are attending a summit in Las Vegas.[10] Mickey and Microchip's investigation leads to them being captured by Hydra, though the two are able to stave off being executed by the organization by telling Werner von Strucker that they are members of the Secret Empire.[1] The duo escape, track the Punisher down to a Nevada airport, and give him, Nomad, and Daredevil a drive back to New York City.[11]

A group of hitmen hired by Rosalie Carbone hunt Mickey down in order to obtain intel on the Punisher.[12] After being interrogated by the assassins, Mickey is locked in the trunk of their car, which he escapes from due to the vehicle being hijacked and crashed by a Chinese gang.[13]

The Punisher goes to Mickey for information regarding visiting Yakuza and, after saving him from the Russian gangsters whose shipment of meat Mickey had stolen, learns from him that a number of foreign crime lords are going to be attending an auction in Atlantic City.[14] The Punisher subsequently has Mickey, who had taken to bootlegging cartoons, tell him about a child pornographer living in Long Island,[15] and help him rescue his stolen guard dog, Max.[16] Salvatore Carbone, who had become a superhuman called Thorn, then finds and tries to get revenge on Mickey, but he is defeated by the Punisher.[17]

Mickey and Microchip team-up again to help the Punisher infiltrate and plant explosives in Manhattan Tower.[18][19] When the Punisher seemingly dies blowing up Manhattan Tower, Mickey panics, and abandons Microchip.[20] Mickey goes into hiding, but is located by Microchip, who convinces Mickey to help him rebuild his depleted crime fighting network, in the off chance that the Punisher survived the destruction of Manhattan Tower.[21][22]

Mickey becomes involved with counterfeiters, betrays them, and is saved from retribution by Microchip.[23] After the Punisher catches him trying to steal telephone card numbers at an airport, Mickey tips the vigilante off about Russian mobsters who are arranging a deal with a Vietnamese gangster named Randy Kwoc.[24] Later, the Punisher blows up Mickey's chop shop, and has Mickey tell him about an up-and-coming drug lord known as Cringe.[25] The Punisher then moves into Mickey's trailer with the two hackers he had recruited to replace Microchip, with whom he had a falling out, not knowing that Mickey is secretly in contact with Cringe, who is really Microchip.[26][27][28]

A rogue S.H.I.E.L.D. operative called Stone Cold begins eliminating vigilantes, and attempts to find the Punisher by capturing and interrogating Mickey.[3][29][30][31] While Stone Cold is out hunting the Punisher and Microchip, Mickey breaks the chair he was left tied to, and returns to his trailer, where he is taunted by a passing Bullseye.[32][33] Stone Cold recaptures Mickey, but the informant is freed by agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.[34]

Mickey later has information pertaining to a drug dealer known as Daddy Wronglegs beaten out of him by the Punisher.[35] After Black Widow's car is hijacked, she and Dagger trace its whereabouts to Mickey's Salvage, a car lot that Mickey has established in Weehawken. Using her powers, Dagger is able to get Mickey to divulge the whereabouts of Black Widows's car.[36] With his soul cleansed by Dagger's abilities, Mickey gives up his criminal ways and becomes religiously devout; when the Punisher finds Mickey in a Brooklyn church and discerns that he has genuinely changed, the vigilante severs all ties with him, musing, "So Mickey Fondozzi's found religion. You can't even trust a snitch anymore".[37][38]

Other versions[edit]

The Punisher/Painkiller Jane[edit]

Mickey is "a lousy little snitch" who is repeatedly accosted for information by the Punisher. Painkiller Jane shoots Mickey to death after he tells her that he sold the Punisher out to a crime lord named Vinnie Veronica.[39]

In other media[edit]

Film[edit]

  • Mickey is portrayed by Eddie Jemison in the 2004 Punisher film, which renamed the character Mickey Duka. An affiliate of the Saint crime family, Mickey is psychologically tortured (in a shot for shot recreation of his introduction in the comics)[40][41] by the Punisher into helping him wipe out the Saints.[42] Mickey, who actually despises the Saints as much as Castle does, willingly becomes his mole afterwards and helps him cause the Saints to destroy each other before Castle personally kills Howard Saint.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Chuck Dixon (w), John Hebert (p), Fred Fredericks (i), Glynis Oliver (col), Jim Novak (let), Don Daley (ed). "Hot Chrome and Cold Blood" The Punisher War Journal #46 (1 September 1992), United States: Marvel Comics
  2. ^ Williams, Owen (28 January 2016). "The Punisher: a complete history". empireonline.com. Empire. Retrieved 20 May 2016. 
  3. ^ a b Chuck Dixon (w), Mel Ruby (p), Steve Moncuse, Mike Kraiger, and M. Peter Keating (i), John Kalisz (col), Vickie Williams (let), Chris Cooper (ed). "Bound by Blood" The Punisher War Journal #77 (1 April 1995), United States: Marvel Comics
  4. ^ a b Chuck Dixon (w), John Romita, Jr. (p), Klaus Janson (i), Gregory Wright (col), Jim Novak (let), Don Daley (ed). "Only the Dead Know Brooklyn" The Punisher War Zone #1 (March 1992), United States: Marvel Comics
  5. ^ Chuck Dixon (w), John Romita, Jr. (p), Klaus Janson (i), Gregory Wright (col), Jim Novak (let), Don Daley (ed). "Blood in the Water" The Punisher War Zone #2 (April 1992), United States: Marvel Comics
  6. ^ Chuck Dixon (w), John Romita, Jr. (p), Klaus Janson (i), Gregory Wright (col), Jim Novak (let), Don Daley (ed). "The Frame" The Punisher War Zone #3 (May 1992), United States: Marvel Comics
  7. ^ Chuck Dixon (w), John Romita, Jr. (p), Klaus Janson (i), Gregory Wright (col), Jim Novak (let), Don Daley (ed). "Closer to the Flames" The Punisher War Zone #4 (June 1992), United States: Marvel Comics
  8. ^ Chuck Dixon (w), John Romita, Jr. (p), Klaus Janson (i), Gregory Wright (col), Jim Novak (let), Don Daley (ed). "Feeding Frenzy" The Punisher War Zone #5 (July 1992), United States: Marvel Comics
  9. ^ Chuck Dixon (w), John Romita, Jr. (p), Klaus Janson (i), Gregory Wright (col), Jim Novak (let), Don Daley (ed). "The Carrion Eaters" The Punisher War Zone #6 (August 1992), United States: Marvel Comics
  10. ^ Chuck Dixon (w), John Hebert (p), Fred Fredericks (i), Glynis Oliver (col), Jim Novak (let), Don Daley (ed). "The Vegas Idea" The Punisher War Journal #45 (10 August 1992), United States: Marvel Comics
  11. ^ Chuck Dixon (w), John Hebert (p), Fred Fredericks (i), Glynis Oliver (col), Jim Novak (let), Don Daley (ed). "Say Goodbye to Vegas" The Punisher War Journal #47 (10 October 1992), United States: Marvel Comics
  12. ^ Chuck Dixon (w), Mike Harris (p), Mike Manley (i), Kevin Tinsley (col), Michael Higgins (let), Don Daley (ed). "Goners" The Punisher War Zone #9 (November 1992), United States: Marvel Comics
  13. ^ Chuck Dixon (w), Mike Harris (p), J.J. Birch and Mike Manley (i), Kevin Tinsley (col), Michael Higgins (let), Don Daley (ed). "Tight Spot" The Punisher War Zone #10 (December 1992), United States: Marvel Comics
  14. ^ Chuck Dixon (w), John Buscema (p), John Buscema (i), Kevin Tinsley and Ericka T. Moran (col), Michael Higgins (let), Don Daley (ed). "Bulletproof" The Punisher War Zone Annual #1 (1993), United States: Marvel Comics
  15. ^ Chuck Dixon (w), Joe Phillips (p), Joe Phillips (i), Kevin Tinsley and Ericka Moran (col), Phil Felix (let), Don Daley (ed). "Faster, Faster" The Punisher Summer Special #3 (August 1993), United States: Marvel Comics
  16. ^ Chuck Dixon (w), Gary Kwapise (p), Gary Kwapise (i), Glynis Oliver (col), Janice Chiang (let), Don Daley (ed). "Dogged" The Punisher War Journal #60 (1 November 1993), United States: Marvel Comics
  17. ^ Chuck Dixon (w), Dale Eaglesham (p), Al Williamson (i), Christie Scheele (col), Bill Oakley (let), Don Daley (ed). "Hurt So Good" The Punisher War Zone Annual #2 (1994), United States: Marvel Comics
  18. ^ Chuck Dixon (w), Gary Kwapisz (p), Gary Kwapisz (i), Joe Andreani (col), Janice Chiang (let), Don Daley (ed). "Terminal Objectives Pt. 1" The Punisher War Journal #61 (1 December 1993), United States: Marvel Comics
  19. ^ Larry Hama (w), John Buscema (p), Art Nichols, Val Mayerik, and Jimmy Palmiotti (i), Ericka Moran and Kevin Tinsley (col), Michael Higgins (let), Don Daley (ed). "Bringing Down the House Pt. 2" The Punisher War Zone #23 (January 1994), United States: Marvel Comics
  20. ^ Steven Grant (w), Hugh Haynes (p), Mick Gray, Frank Percy, Jon Holdredge, Mark McKenna (i), Lia Pelosi and Joe Andreani (col), Michael Higgins (let), Don Daley (ed). "Deadline Pt. 3" The Punisher v2, #86 (January 1994), United States: Marvel Comics
  21. ^ Chuck Dixon (w), Gary Kwapisz (p), Gary Kwapisz (i), Glynis Oliver (col), Janice Chiang (let), Don Daley (ed). "Everything Changes Pt. 10" The Punisher War Journal #64 (1 March 1994), United States: Marvel Comics
  22. ^ Steven Grant (w), Hugh Haynes (p), Mick Gray, Scott Koblish, and Mark McKenna (i), John Kalisz (col), Michael Higgins (let), Don Daley (ed). "Pariah, Part 4: Bad Turn" The Punisher War Journal #68 (July 1994), United States: Marvel Comics
  23. ^ Chuck Dixon (w), Greg Luzniak (p), Matt Banning (i), John Kalisz (col), Jim Novak (let), Don Daley (ed). "Killing an Afternoon" The Punisher Summer Special #4 (July 1994), United States: Marvel Comics
  24. ^ Chuck Dixon (w), Joe Kubert (p), Joe Kubert (i), Joe Rosas (col), Uncredited (let), Don Daley (ed). "River of Blood, Part 1: Scorched Earth" The Punisher War Zone #31 (September 1994), United States: Marvel Comics
  25. ^ Chuck Dixon (w), Rod Whigham (p), Rudy Nebres (i), Chia-Chi Wang (col), Jim Novak (let), Don Daley (ed). "The Devil's Secret Name" The Punisher v2, #97 (December 1994), United States: Marvel Comics
  26. ^ Chuck Dixon (w), Rod Whigham (p), Nebres and L-Man (i), Laughlin and Chia-Chi (col), Vickie Williams (let), Don Daley (ed). "Armies of the Night" The Punisher v2, #98 (January 1995), United States: Marvel Comics
  27. ^ Chuck Dixon (w), Rod Whigham (p), Nebres and L-Man (i), Chia-Chi Wang (col), Vickie Williams (let), Don Daley (ed). "Bury Me Deep" The Punisher v2, #99 (February 1995), United States: Marvel Comics
  28. ^ Chuck Dixon (w), Rod Whigham (p), Rudy Nebres, Elman Brown, Mike Higgins, Scott Elmer, Mick Gray, Tim Tuohy, and Phil Sheehy (i), Chia-Chi Wang (col), Ul Higgins (let), Don Daley (ed). "The Cage" The Punisher v2, #100 (March 1995), United States: Marvel Comics
  29. ^ Chuck Dixon (w), Rod Whigham (p), Pam Eklund (i), Chi (col), Vickie Williams (let), Chris Cooper (ed). "Under the Gun" The Punisher v2, #102 (May 1995), United States: Marvel Comics
  30. ^ Chuck Dixon (w), Paul Martin and Melvin Rubi (p), John Lowe, Mike Kraiger, Pam Eklund, and Steve Moncuse (i), Bob Sharen (col), Vickie Williams (let), Chris Cooper (ed). "One Wicked Day" The Punisher War Journal #78 (1 May 1995), United States: Marvel Comics
  31. ^ Chuck Dixon (w), Rod Whigham (p), Enrique Villagran (i), Chia-Chi Wang (col), Vickie Williams (let), Chris Cooper (ed). "Countdown: 4 - The Butcher's Block" The Punisher v2, #103 (June 1995), United States: Marvel Comics
  32. ^ Chuck Dixon (w), Douglas T. Wheatley (p), Steve Moncuse (i), John Kalisz (col), Vickie Williams (let), Chris Cooper (ed). "Countdown: 3 - House of the Dead" The Punisher War Journal #79 (June 1995), United States: Marvel Comics
  33. ^ Chuck Dixon (w), Rod Whigham (p), Mike Witherby (i), Tom Ziuku (col), Vickie Williams (let), Chris Cooper (ed). "Countdown: 2 - Dead and Deader" The Punisher War Zone #41 (July 1995), United States: Marvel Comics
  34. ^ Chuck Dixon (w), Rod Whigham (p), Enrique Villagran (i), Chia-Chi Wang (col), Vickie Williams (let), Chris Cooper (ed). "Countdown: 1 - The Murder Men" The Punisher v2, #104 (July 1995), United States: Marvel Comics
  35. ^ Chuck Dixon (w), Ed Barreto (p), Klaus Janson (i), Avalon Studios' Dave Kemp (col), RS and Comicraft's Troy Peteri (let), Joe Quesada (ed). "Family and Friends" Marvel Knights #5 (1 November 2000), United States: Marvel Comics
  36. ^ Chuck Dixon (w), Ed Barreto (p), Nelson (i), Avalon Studios' Dave Kemp (col), RS and Comicraft's Jason Levine (let), Stuart Moore and Nanci Dakesian (ed). "The Good with The Bad" Marvel Knights #10 (1 April 2001), United States: Marvel Comics
  37. ^ "The Religious Affiliation of Mickey Fondozzi". comicbookreligion.com. Comic Book Religion. Retrieved 26 May 2015. 
  38. ^ Chuck Dixon (w), Ed Barreto (p), Nelson (i), Avalon Studios' Dave Kemp (col), RS and Comicraft's Jason Levine (let), Stuart Moore and Nanci Dakesian (ed). "Hero for Hire" Marvel Knights #11 (1 May 2001), United States: Marvel Comics
  39. ^ Garth Ennis (w), Joe Jusko and Dave Ross (p), Josef Rubinstein (i), Avalon Studios (col), Comicraft's Richard Starkings (let), Nanci Dakesian and Jimmy Palmiotti (ed). "Lovesick" The Punisher/Painkiller Jane #1 (January 2001), United States: Marvel Comics
  40. ^ Richards, Dave (23 March 2004). "Behind the Scenes with Punisher Writer Michael France". comicbookresources.com. Comic Book Resources. Retrieved 3 September 2007. 
  41. ^ "Chuck Dixon criticizes Marvel for not giving Jim Starlin credit for Thanos' movie appearance". digitalspy.co.uk. Digital Spy. 9 July 2012. Retrieved 27 May 2015. 
  42. ^ Jonathan Hensleigh (Director) (16 April 2004). The Punisher (Motion picture). United States: Lions Gate Entertainment. 

External links[edit]