Micrurus nigrocinctus babaspul

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Micrurus nigrocinctus babaspul
Scientific classification e
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Reptilia
Order: Squamata
Suborder: Serpentes
Family: Elapidae
Genus: Micrurus
Species: M. nigrocinctus
Subspecies: M. n. babaspul
Trinomial name
Micrurus nigrocinctus babaspul
Roze, 1967

Micrurus nigrocinctus babaspul, or the babaspul (Creole for "barber's pole"), is a subspecies of Micrurus nigrocinctus, commonly known as the Central American coral snake. M. n. babaspul is a venomous elapid from Big Corn Island (Isla Grande del Maíz), Nicaragua. According to O'Shea (2008) this is an endangered subspecies, and the subspecies may even be extinct.

Description[edit]

M. n. babaspul is a tricoloured monadal coral snake. Its color pattern consists of rings in the order red/yellow/black/yellow/red. Being a monadal coral snake, it only has one black ring between each pair of red rings. It has a round small head with a long slender body. Adults may attain a total length (including tail) of 1.5–2 ft (46–61 cm).

Geographic Range[edit]

The babaspul is endemic to Big Corn Island, Nicaragua.

Habitat[edit]

M. n. babaspul inhabits tropical moist forests.

Diet[edit]

The babaspul will actively hunt small lizards and small snakes, and if available will take some rodents small enough for it to consume.

Reproduction[edit]

There is not much known about the reproduction of the babaspul, but it is believed to be an oviparous species.

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]