MidAmerican Energy Company

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MidAmerican Energy Company
Private company
Industry Energy
Founded 1995
Headquarters Des Moines, Iowa, U.S.
Area served
Iowa
Illinois
South Dakota
Nebraska
Key people
Adam L. Wright, President & CEO
Products Electricity generation, transmission and distribution
Parent Berkshire Hathaway Energy
Website www.midamericanenergy.com

MidAmerican Energy Company is an energy company based in Des Moines, Iowa.[1] Its service area includes almost two-thirds of Iowa, as well as portions of Illinois, South Dakota, and Nebraska. Its territory is wholly encompassed by the territory of the Midcontinent Independent System Operator. Major cities in MidAmerican Energy's service territory are Des Moines, Sioux City, Sioux Falls, Council Bluffs, Waterloo, Iowa City, and the Quad Cities.

MidAmerican Energy Company is a subsidiary of Berkshire Hathaway Energy.

History[edit]

MidAmerican Energy was formed in 1995 by the merger of the Iowa-Illinois Gas and Electric Company, the main power provider for southeastern Iowa, with Midwest Resources, the main power provider for the central and western Iowa.[2] Midwest Resources in turn, was formed in 1990 by the merger of Midwest Energy and Iowa Resources. Midwest Energy was the holding company for Iowa Public Service company (IPS), the main power provider for northwestern Iowa, while Iowa Resources was the holding company for Iowa Power and Light Company, the main power provider for central and southwestern Iowa.[3]

By 2017, the company had 760,000 electric customers and over 740,000 natural gas customers.[4]

Walter Scott, Jr. Energy Center[edit]

MidAmerican Energy is the developer and operator of the Walter Scott, Jr. Energy Center, a four-unit coal-fired power plant based in Council Bluffs. It produces more than 1,600 megawatts of electricity.[5]

Renewable energy[edit]

In addition to traditional power plants, MidAmerican Energy began investing in green energy generation in 2004. As of March 2014, approximately 2,285 megawatts, or nearly 30 percent, of MidAmerican Energy’s total owned generation capacity came from energy generated by the company’s 1,267 wind turbines. In May 2013, MidAmerican Energy announced plans to invest up to $1.9 billion to expand its wind generation fleet and add up to 1,050 megawatts of wind generation in Iowa by year-end 2015. Siemens Wind Power, the manufacturer of the turbines, states that at the time (December 2013) this was the largest single order of onshore wind power turbines that any company had ever received.[6] Components for the turbines are manufactured at two different sites in Iowa and Kansas, and all turbines are to be sited in Iowa.[7] Once the expansion is complete, approximately 3,335 megawatts, or approximately 39 percent, of MidAmerican Energy’s total owned generation capacity will come from wind-powered generation from 1,715 wind turbines.[8] MidAmerican Energy projects that wind power will supply one third of its energy generation by 2020.[9] As of 2016, MAE operates 2 GW of SWP turbines and 1 GW GE Wind. In June 2016 MAE signed up for 2 GW in Iowa (Wind XI) supplied by Vestas in Colorado, estimated at $2.2 billion. On July 26, 2016, MAE agreed to supply power to Facebook, Microsoft and Google datacenters in Iowa from Wind XI.[10]

Hiring of veterans[edit]

MidAmerican Energy won the "Military Friendly Employer Award" in 2017 for its efforts to hire veterans. On its website, the company provides and "Opportunities for Veterans" section that pinpoints which civilian positions open at the company translate well from a military career. Examples of jobs include engineering, outage project managers, and plant operators.[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.midamericanenergy.com/our-company.aspx
  2. ^ James Averweg Testimony before the Iowa Utilities Board, Iowa Utilities Board, June 7, 2007.
  3. ^ Midwest Resources Inc company history from Funding Universe
  4. ^ a b Riley, Kim (2017-10-11). "Utilities open employment arms to U.S. military veterans". Daily Energy Insider. Retrieved 2017-10-23. 
  5. ^ "Just the Facts: Walter Scott, Jr. Energy Center's New 790-Megawatt Unit" (PDF). Retrieved 2009-08-27. 
  6. ^ "Siemens awarded largest onshore wind power order to date". Siemens Global Website. Retrieved 4 March 2014. 
  7. ^ "World's biggest onshore wind turbine order goes to Iowan wind projects". EcoSeed. Archived from the original on 4 March 2014. Retrieved 4 March 2014. 
  8. ^ "Wind energy overview". MidAmerican Energy Company. Retrieved 4 March 2014. 
  9. ^ Iowa Utilities Board Docket No: RPU-2013-0003.  Missing or empty |title= (help);
  10. ^ Ros Davidson (29 July 2016). "How Vestas won the Midwest". Windpower Monthly. Retrieved 1 August 2016. 

External links[edit]