Middlesex, New Jersey

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Middlesex, New Jersey
Borough of Middlesex
Joseph and Minnie White House in Middlesex
Joseph and Minnie White House in Middlesex
Middlesex highlighted in Middlesex County. Inset: Location of Middlesex County in New Jersey.
Middlesex highlighted in Middlesex County. Inset: Location of Middlesex County in New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Middlesex, New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Middlesex, New Jersey.
Coordinates: 40°34′29″N 74°29′54″W / 40.574627°N 74.498259°W / 40.574627; -74.498259Coordinates: 40°34′29″N 74°29′54″W / 40.574627°N 74.498259°W / 40.574627; -74.498259[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
CountyMiddlesex
IncorporatedApril 9, 1913
Named forMiddlesex, England
Government
 • TypeBorough
 • BodyBorough Council
 • MayorRonald J. DiMira (D, term ends December 31, 2019)[3][4]
 • AdministratorMarcia A. Karrow[5]
 • Municipal clerkGretchen McCarthy[6]
Area
 • Total3.540 sq mi (9.169 km2)
 • Land3.518 sq mi (9.111 km2)
 • Water0.022 sq mi (0.058 km2)  0.63%
Area rank312th of 566 in state
16th of 25 in county[1]
Elevation39 ft (12 m)
Population
 • Total13,635
 • Estimate 
(2018)[12]
13,712
 • Rank182nd of 566 in state
17th of 25 in county[13]
 • Density3,876.2/sq mi (1,496.6/km2)
 • Density rank159th of 566 in state
12th of 25 in county[13]
Time zoneUTC−5:00 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC−4:00 (Eastern (EDT))
ZIP Code
Area code(s)732[16]
FIPS code3402345900[1][17][18]
GNIS feature ID0885299[1][19]
Websitewww.middlesexboro.com

Middlesex is a borough in Middlesex County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 13,635[9][10][11] reflecting a decline of 82 (-0.6%) from the 13,717 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 662 (+5.1%) from the 13,055 counted in the 1990 Census.[20]

Middlesex was incorporated as a borough by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on April 9, 1913, from portions of Piscataway, based on the results of a referendum held on May 6, 1913.[21] The borough's name derives from Middlesex, England.[22][23]

History[edit]

The Harris Lane School was a one-room schoolhouse that was the oldest school in Middlesex County, dating back to its construction in the 1790s.[24] The original Pierce School was known as the East Bound Brook School House and The Parker House was also used for education until it was converted into a two-family house. As the Borough grew new schools were constructed to accommodate many more students. Our Lady of Mt. Virgin School was the first parochial school built in 1954.

In 1905, the Lincoln section of Middlesex organized a volunteer fire company and that set the organization of four other fire companies in the Borough.

Middlesex was a portion of Piscataway Township, until May 6, 1913 when it was incorporated as a separate entity through the action of the state legislature and local referendum.[21] George Harris was elected as the first mayor and the first borough council was elected at the same time. Two constables were the law enforcement officers and were soon assisted by five appointed marshals.

Uranium processing and aftermath[edit]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, Middlesex borough had a total area of 3.540 square miles (9.169 km2), including 3.518 square miles (9.111 km2) of land and 0.022 square miles (0.058 km2) of water (0.63%).[1][2]

Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the borough include East Bound Brook and Lincoln.[25]

The borough borders the Middlesex County municipalities of Dunellen and Piscataway Township in Middlesex County; and Bound Brook, Bridgewater Township, Green Brook Township and South Bound Brook in Somerset County.[26][27][28]

Middlesex is in the central division of the Raritan Valley (a line of cities in central New Jersey), along with Dunellen, Bound Brook, and South Bound Brook.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
19201,852
19303,50489.2%
19403,7637.4%
19505,94357.9%
196010,52077.0%
197015,03842.9%
198013,480−10.4%
199013,055−3.2%
200013,7175.1%
201013,635−0.6%
Est. 201813,712[12][29][30]0.6%
Population sources:
1920[31] 1920-1930[32]
1930-1990[33] 2000[34][35] 2010[9][10][11]

Census 2010[edit]

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 13,635 people, 4,984 households, and 3,633.336 families residing in the borough. The population density was 3,876.2 per square mile (1,496.6/km2). There were 5,148 housing units at an average density of 1,463.5 per square mile (565.1/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 81.24% (11,077) White, 5.13% (699) Black or African American, 0.18% (24) Native American, 6.00% (818) Asian, 0.07% (10) Pacific Islander, 5.37% (732) from other races, and 2.02% (275) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 16.47% (2,246) of the population.[9]

There were 4,984 households out of which 32.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.0% were married couples living together, 11.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.1% were non-families. 22.2% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.73 and the average family size was 3.22.[9]

In the borough, the population was spread out with 22.5% under the age of 18, 8.1% from 18 to 24, 26.1% from 25 to 44, 29.5% from 45 to 64, and 13.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40.7 years. For every 100 females there were 93.9 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and older there were 91.8 males.[9]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $80,338 (with a margin of error of +/- $7,790) and the median family income was $93,817 (+/- $13,746). Males had a median income of $55,248 (+/- $7,439) versus $46,447 (+/- $5,086) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $34,607 (+/- $3,321). About 0.6% of families and 2.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.6% of those under age 18 and 4.6% of those age 65 or over.[36]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[17] there were 13,717 people, 5,048 households, and 3,740 families residing in the borough. The population density was 3,921.1 people per square mile (1,513.2/km2). There were 5,130 housing units at an average density of 1,466.5 per square mile (565.9/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 87.26% White, 3.36% African American, 0.13% Native American, 4.16% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 3.21% from other races, and 1.86% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 9.00% of the population.[34][35]

There were 5,048 households out of which 34.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.3% were married couples living together, 10.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.9% were non-families. 21.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.71 and the average family size was 3.17.[34][35]

In the borough the population was spread out with 24.1% under the age of 18, 6.2% from 18 to 24, 32.3% from 25 to 44, 23.2% from 45 to 64, and 14.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females, there were 95.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.9 males.[34][35]

The median income for a household in the borough was $60,723, and the median income for a family was $70,343. Males had a median income of $47,446 versus $34,232 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $27,834. About 2.4% of families and 3.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.1% of those under age 18 and 2.3% of those age 65 or over.[34][35]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Middlesex is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government, which is used in 218 municipalities statewide, making it the most common form of government in New Jersey.[37] The governing body consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at-large on a partisan basis as part of the November general election. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle.[7] The Borough form of government used by Middlesex, the most common system used in the state, is a "weak mayor / strong council" government in which council members act as the legislative body with the mayor presiding at meetings and voting only in the event of a tie. The mayor can veto ordinances subject to an override by a two-thirds majority vote of the council. The mayor makes committee and liaison assignments for council members, and most appointments are made by the mayor with the advice and consent of the council.[38][39]

The seven-member governing body is empowered to enact local ordinances, to levy municipal taxes and conduct the affairs of the community. In almost all cases, it can review and approve the actions of other Middlesex Borough committees and agencies. The Mayor and Borough Council conduct all of their business during monthly meetings open to the public. All legislative powers of the Borough are exercised by the Mayor and Council. These powers can take the form of a resolution, ordinance or proclamation.

As of 2019, the Mayor of Middlesex is Democrat Ronald J. DiMura, whose term of office ends December 31, 2019. Members of the Middlesex Borough Council are Council President John L. Madden (R, 2020), Jason Carr (R, 2021), Kevin Dotey (D, 2019), John "Jack" Mikolajczyk (R, 2020), Daniel Parenti (D, 2019), Douglas Rex (R, 2021).[3][40][41][42][43][44][45]

Until his selection in early 2006 to serve as borough administrator, Ron Dobies had been one of the longest-tenured mayor in New Jersey, with 26 years of service to Middlesex. Dobies left his position as mayor in 2006 and took a position as the borough's administrator. After being fired in 2008, he was successful in his suit against the borough and was restored to his position. In 2011 he ran for mayor again and won a four-year term that ended in 2015.[46]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Middlesex is located in the 12th Congressional District[47] and is part of New Jersey's 22nd state legislative district.[10][48][49] Prior to the 2010 Census, Middlesex had been part of the 6th Congressional District, a change made by the New Jersey Redistricting Commission that took effect in January 2013, based on the results of the November 2012 general elections.[50]

For the 116th United States Congress, New Jersey's Twelfth Congressional District is represented by Bonnie Watson Coleman (D, Ewing Township).[51][52] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Democrats Cory Booker (Newark, term ends 2021)[53] and Bob Menendez (Paramus, term ends 2025).[54][55]

For the 2018–2019 session (Senate, General Assembly), the 22nd Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Nicholas Scutari (D, Linden) and in the General Assembly by Linda Carter (politician) (D, Plainfield) and James J. Kennedy (D, Rahway).[56][57] Carter was appointed in May 2018 to fill the vacant seat left following the death of Jerry Green the previous month after 26 years of service.[58]

Middlesex County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders, whose seven members are elected at-large on a partisan basis to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either two or three seats coming up for election each year as part of the November general election. At an annual reorganization meeting held in January, the board selects from among its members a Freeholder Director and Deputy Director. As of 2015, Middlesex County's Freeholders (with party affiliation, term-end year, residence and committee chairmanship listed in parentheses) are Freeholder Director Ronald G. Rios (D, term ends December 31, 2015, Carteret; Ex-officio on all committees),[59] Freeholder Deputy Director Carol Barrett Bellante (D, 2017; Monmouth Junction, South Brunswick Township; County Administration),[60] Kenneth Armwood (D, 2016, Piscataway; Business Development and Education),[61] Charles Kenny ( D, 2016, Woodbridge Township; Finance),[62] H. James Polos (D, 2015, Highland Park; Public Safety and Health),[63] Charles E. Tomaro (D, 2017, Edison; Infrastructure Management)[64] and Blanquita B. Valenti (D, 2016, New Brunswick; Community Services).[65][66] Constitutional officers are County Clerk Elaine M. Flynn (D, Old Bridge Township),[67] Sheriff Mildred S. Scott (D, 2016, Piscataway)[68] and Surrogate Kevin J. Hoagland (D, 2017; New Brunswick).[66][69]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 8,366 registered voters in Middlesex, of which 2,094 (25.0%) were registered as Democrats, 1,605 (19.2%) were registered as Republicans and 4,662 (55.7%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 5 voters registered to other parties.[70]

In the 2012 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 50.8% of the vote (2,819 cast), ahead of Republican Mitt Romney with 47.7% (2,645 votes), and other candidates with 1.4% (80 votes), among the 5,587 ballots cast by the borough's 8,481 registered voters (43 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 65.9%.[71][72] In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 51.6% of the vote (3,185 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 45.9% (2,837 votes) and other candidates with 1.4% (84 votes), among the 6,177 ballots cast by the borough's 8,612 registered voters, for a turnout of 71.7%.[73] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 53.0% of the vote (3,202 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry with 45.6% (2,755 votes) and other candidates with 0.7% (58 votes), among the 6,040 ballots cast by the borough's 8,376 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 72.1.[74]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 69.4% of the vote (2,478 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 29.3% (1,045 votes), and other candidates with 1.3% (46 votes), among the 3,617 ballots cast by the borough's 8,552 registered voters (48 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 42.3%.[75][76] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 58.2% of the vote (2,410 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 31.6% (1,307 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 8.1% (336 votes) and other candidates with 1.1% (46 votes), among the 4,142 ballots cast by the borough's 8,374 registered voters, yielding a 49.5% turnout.[77]

Education[edit]

The Middlesex Board of Education serves public school students in pre-kindergarten through twelfth grade.[78] The district includes three elementary schools, a middle school and a high school.[79] As of the 2017-18 school year, the district and its five schools had an enrollment of 2,077 students and 175.4 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 11.8:1.[80] Schools in the district (with 2017-18 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[81]) are Hazelwood Elementary School[82] (207 students; in grades PreK-3), Parker Elementary School[83] (222; K-3), Watchung Elementary School[84] (211; K-3), Von E. Mauger Middle School[85] (792; 4-8) and Middlesex High School[86] (635; 9-12).[87][88] The district's superintendent is Dr. Frederick Williams.[89]

Eighth grade students from all of Middlesex County are eligible to apply to attend the high school programs offered by the Middlesex County Vocational and Technical Schools, a county-wide vocational school district that offers full-time career and technical education at Middlesex County Academy in Edison, the Academy for Allied Health and Biomedical Sciences in Woodbridge Township and at its East Brunswick, Perth Amboy and Piscataway technical high schools, with no tuition charged to students for attendance.[90][91]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

Route 28, the most prominent highway in Middlesex

As of May 2010, the borough had a total of 54.86 miles (88.29 km) of roadways, of which 48.23 miles (77.62 km) were maintained by the municipality, 3.49 miles (5.62 km) by Middlesex County and 3.14 miles (5.05 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation[92]

New Jersey Route 28 is the main highway passing through Middlesex.[93] Route 28 provides access to Interstate 287; U.S. Route 22 lies just north of the borough.[94]

Public transportation[edit]

NJ Transit provides service to and from the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan on the 114 route and to Newark on the 65 and 66 routes.[95]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Middlesex include:

References[edit]

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  3. ^ a b Ronald J. DiMura, Borough of Middlesex. Accessed December 5, 2019.
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  6. ^ Contact Us, Borough of Middlesex. Accessed December 5, 2019.
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  8. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Middlesex, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 8, 2013.
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  79. ^ About Us, Middlesex Board of Education. Accessed December 4, 2019. "The Middlesex Borough Public School system is comprised of five schools: three primary (Pre-K - grade 3), one middle school (Grades 4–8), and one high school (Grades 9-12). The schools serve approximately 2,100 students."
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  83. ^ Parker Elementary School, Middlesex Board of Education. Accessed December 4, 2019.
  84. ^ Watchung Elementary School, Middlesex Board of Education. Accessed December 4, 2019.
  85. ^ Von E. Mauger Middle School, Middlesex Board of Education. Accessed December 4, 2019.
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  88. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Middlesex Board of Education, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed December 29, 2016.
  89. ^ Administrators, Middlesex Board of Education. Accessed December 4, 2019.
  90. ^ Heyboer, Kelly. "How to get your kid a seat in one of N.J.'s hardest-to-get-into high schools", NJ Advance Media for NJ.com, May 2017. Accessed November 18, 2019. "Middlesex County has two stand-alone career academies for high-achieving students: the Academy for Science, Math and Engineering Technology, located on the campus of Middlesex County College in Edison, and the Academy for Allied Health and Biomedical Sciences in Woodbridge. How to apply: Students must attend a mandatory information session and submit an application by November of their 8th grade year."
  91. ^ Locations, Middlesex County Vocational and Technical Schools. Accessed December 2, 2019.
  92. ^ Middlesex County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed July 18, 2014.
  93. ^ Route 28 Straight Line Diagram, New Jersey Department of Transportation, updated March 2017. Accessed December 5, 2019.
  94. ^ Middlesex County Road Map, New Jersey Department of Transportation. Accessed December 1, 2019.
  95. ^ Middlesex County Bus / Rail Connections, NJ Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 22, 2009. Accessed November 25, 2012.
  96. ^ Nelson, Valerie J. "Tige Andrews, 86; character actor played Capt. Greer in 'Mod Squad'", Los Angeles Times, February 3, 2007. Accessed January 31, 2013. "When Andrews was 3, his mother, Selma, died and his father, George, later remarried. He grew up in a large family in Middlesex, N.J., where his father ran a fruit stand."
  97. ^ MacKenzie, Pamela. "White house revisited", Courier News, March 18, 2005. Accessed June 28, 2011. "Owned by three families - the Whites (the home was designed by Bourke-White's father after the Arts and Crafts style of Gustav Stickley), the Lincolns and the McCrearys - the home is now being sold by the McCreary heirs through Jack Gulla of Century 21 Golden Post Realty for $549,900."
  98. ^ Manahan, Kevin. "Plainsboro swimmer snags spot in Olympic trials final", NJ Advance Media for NJ.com, July 1, 2008. Accessed November 27, 2017. "Descenza, born in Middlesex, learned to swim at the local YMCA and competed with the Middlesex Water Rats until her family moved to Chicago when she was 8."
  99. ^ "Charlie Hustle", copy of article from New York Post, January 23, 2005. Accessed January 31, 2013. "Weis' approach to coaching began on Princeton Drive in Middlesex."

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