Mike Büskens

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Michael Büskens
Mike Büskens 2012.jpg
Personal information
Date of birth (1968-03-19) 19 March 1968 (age 49)
Place of birth Düsseldorf, West Germany
Height 1.81 m (5 ft 11 in)
Playing position Midfielder
Youth career
1974–1981 Alemannia Düsseldorf
1981–1986 Fortuna Düsseldorf
1986–1987 VfL Benrath
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1987–1992 Fortuna Düsseldorf 102 (6)
1992–2000 Schalke 04 223 (13)
2000 MSV Duisburg 12 (1)
2000–2003 Schalke 04 34 (0)
2003–2004 Schalke 04 II 17 (5)
Total 388 (25)
Teams managed
2002–2005 Schalke 04 II (assistant)
2005–2008 Schalke 04 II
2008 Schalke 04 (joint interim)
2008–2009 Schalke 04 (assistant)
2009 Schalke 04 (interim)
2009–2013 Greuther Fürth
2013 Fortuna Düsseldorf
2015 Greuther Fürth
2016 Rapid Wien
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.

Michael 'Mike' Büskens ([ˈmɪçaɛl ˈmaɪ̯k ˈbʏskəns]; born 19 March 1968) is a German manager and former footballer, who played as a midfielder. He was most recently the manager of Rapid Wien.

During a 14-year professional career, he appeared in nearly 400 Bundesliga games, mainly representing Schalke 04 (11 years), and later also briefly managing the latter.

Playing career[edit]

Büskens in Schalke 04 colours in July 1996

Büskens began his career with his hometown team Alemannia Düsseldorf, before he moved to city giants Fortuna. After five years, he moved to VfL Benrath, returning in 1987 to Fortuna, this time as member of the professional squad, and rarely missed one top division game during his three-year spell, although ended in relegation.

In 1992, Büskens moved to FC Schalke 04, and lived the most successful years of his career. He was part of the UEFA Cup and German Cup 2001 and 2002 winning squads, and never appeared in less than 27 league games in his first seven seasons. In the European conquest of 1997, he played in 10 matches (eight complete), including both legs of the final against F.C. Internazionale Milano.

In January 2000, Büskens spent half a season at MSV Duisburg, returning to Schalke after a poor season. He continued to play for the team until 2003, splitting between the first and second squads in his last year, also being assistant manager of the latter.

Managerial career[edit]

Schalke 04[edit]

In 2005, Büskens succeeded Gerhard Kleppinger as manager of the second squad.[1] On 13 April 2008, he was appointed caretaker manager of Schalke's first team, alongside another former club player, Youri Mulder, succeeding Mirko Slomka after a 1–5 away loss to SV Werder Bremen, as the team was battling for a UEFA Champions League position (eventually reaching third).[2]

Büskens remained in charge until the end of the season, being replaced by Dutch Fred Rutten in July 2008.[3] He finished the stint with a record of five wins and a draw.[4] However, in March 2009, the latter was fired, which led to the pair again taking over the side until the end of the season (now accompanied by another former Schalke player, Oliver Reck), being then replaced by Felix Magath,[5] and released by the club on 23 June 2009.[6] He finished his second stint with a record of four wins, one draw, and four losses.[4]

Greuther Fürth[edit]

Büskens was named manager of Greuther Fürth on 27 December 2009.[7] Büskens was sacked on 20 February 2013.[8] He finished with a record of 50 wins, 33 draws, and 33 losses.[9]

Fortuna Düsseldorf[edit]

Büskens was named manager of Fortuna Düsseldorf on 4 June 2013.[10] His first match was a 1–0 win against Energie Cottbus.[11] Büskens picked Fabian Giefer to start the match instead of Michael Rensing.[12] Rensing refused to be a substitute[13] and left the stadium[14] and went home.[15] Robin Heller subsequently took the substitutes bench.[15] Büskens was sacked on 30 November 2013,[16] a day after a 2–0 loss to Karlsruher SC.[11] He finished with a record of five wins, four draws, and 8 losses.[17]

Return to Greuther Fürth[edit]

He was hired for the second time on 23 February 2015.[18] His first match was a 2–1 loss against 1. FC Kaiserslautern on 27 February 2015.[19] Then on 7 March 2015, Fürth and VfR Aalen finished in a 1–1 draw.[19] In a Bavarian derby, on 13 March 2015, Fürth lost 3–0 to 1860 München.[20] He resigned on 28 May 2015.[21] He finished with a record of two wins, four draws, and six losses.[9]

Rapid Wien[edit]

Büskens was hired by Rapid Wien on 7 June 2016.[22] He signed a one–year contract with an option.[23] He replaced Zoran Barisic.[22] His first training session was on 10 June 2016.[24]

On 7 November 2016, Büskens was relieved of his duties.[25]

Managerial statistics[edit]

As of 6 November 2016
Team From To Record
G W D L Win % Ref.
Schalke 04 II 1 July 2005[1] 13 April 2008[1] 96 53 16 27 55.21
Schalke 04 13 April 2008[2] 30 June 2008[3] 6 5 1 0 83.33 [4]
Schalke 04 27 March 2009[5] 23 June 2009[6] 9 4 1 4 44.44 [4]
Greuther Fürth 27 December 2009[7] 20 February 2013[8] 116 50 33 33 43.10 [9]
Fortuna Düsseldorf 4 June 2013[10] 30 November 2013[16] 17 5 4 8 29.41 [17]
Greuther Fürth 23 February 2015[18] 28 May 2015[21] 12 2 4 6 16.67 [9]
Rapid Wien 7 June 2016[22] 7 November 2016[25] 25 11 8 6 44.00
Total 281 130 67 84 46.26

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "FC Schalke 04 II .:. Coaches from A-Z". Worldfootball. Retrieved 16 February 2013. 
  2. ^ a b "Büskens to the rescue at Schalke". UEFA.com. 15 April 2008. Retrieved 21 August 2010. 
  3. ^ a b "Rutten bei S04 vorgestellt". kicker (in German). 23 April 2008. Retrieved 16 February 2013. 
  4. ^ a b c d "FC Schalke 04" (in German). kicker. Retrieved 18 January 2014. 
  5. ^ a b "Magath to swap Wolfsburg for Schalke". UEFA.com. 6 May 2009. Retrieved 21 August 2010. 
  6. ^ a b "Büskens und Mulder ohne Zukunft". kicker. 23 June 2009. Retrieved 16 February 2013. 
  7. ^ a b "Überraschung in Fürth: Büskens macht's!" [Surprise in Fürth: Büskens arrives!] (in German). kicker. 27 December 2009. Retrieved 21 August 2010. 
  8. ^ a b "Aufstiegsheld Büskens muss gehen". kicker (in German). 20 February 2013. Retrieved 20 February 2013. 
  9. ^ a b c d "SpVgg Greuther Fürth". kicker.de (in German). kicker. Retrieved 23 February 2015. 
  10. ^ a b "Düsseldorf stellt Büskens als neuen Trainer vor" (in German). Retrieved 4 June 2013. 
  11. ^ a b "Fortuna Düsseldorf". kicker.de (in German). kicker. Retrieved 23 February 2015. 
  12. ^ "Nur Reisinger kann Almer überwinden" (in German). kicker. 22 July 2013. Retrieved 23 February 2015. 
  13. ^ Röhn, Tim (24 July 2013). "Düsseldorf beweist bei Rensing Menschlichkeit". Die Welt (in German). Retrieved 23 February 2015. 
  14. ^ "Rensing schmeißt hin und flüchtet mit dem Auto". Die Welt (in German). 22 July 2013. Retrieved 23 February 2015. 
  15. ^ a b "Rensing bleibt auch als Nummer zwei in Düsseldorf". Die Welt (in German). 24 July 2013. Retrieved 23 February 2015. 
  16. ^ a b "Fortuna trennt sich von Büskens". kicker (in German). 30 November 2013. Retrieved 30 November 2013. 
  17. ^ a b "Fortuna Düsseldorf". kicker.de (in German). kicker. Retrieved 23 February 2015. 
  18. ^ a b "Fürth entlässt Kramer - Büskens übernimmt" (in German). kicker. 23 February 2015. Retrieved 23 February 2015. 
  19. ^ a b "SpVgg Greuther Fürth". kicker.de (in German). kicker. Retrieved 13 March 2015. 
  20. ^ "1860 München demütigt Fürth". Süddeutsche Zeitung. 13 March 2015. Retrieved 13 March 2015. 
  21. ^ a b "Trainer Büskens verlässt Fürth" (in German). Süddeutsche Zeitung. 28 May 2015. Retrieved 28 May 2015. 
  22. ^ a b c "Coup: Büskens übernimmt bei Rapid Wien" (in German). kicker. 7 June 2016. Retrieved 7 June 2016. 
  23. ^ "Mike Büskens wird neuer Rapid-Trainer" (in German). Österreich. 7 June 2016. Retrieved 7 June 2016. 
  24. ^ "Erstes Rapid-Training von Mike Büskens" (in German). Österreich. 10 June 2016. Retrieved 15 June 2016. 
  25. ^ a b Huber, Alexander (7 November 2016). "Rapid feuert Trainer Büskens und Sportdirektor Müller". Kurier (in German). Retrieved 7 November 2016. 

External links[edit]