Mike Gapes

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Mike Gapes

Official portrait of Mike Gapes crop 2.jpg
Independent Group Spokesperson for Foreign Affairs and Defence
Assumed office
1 March 2019
SpokespersonChuka Umunna
Preceded byOffice established
Chair of the Foreign Affairs Select Committee
In office
19 July 2005 – 17 May 2010
Preceded byDonald Anderson
Succeeded byRichard Ottaway
Member of Parliament
for Ilford South
Assumed office
9 April 1992
Preceded byNeil Thorne
Majority31,647 (54.9%)
Personal details
Born
Michael John Gapes

(1952-09-04) 4 September 1952 (age 66)
Wanstead, Essex, England
NationalityBritish
Political partyThe Independent Group (2019–present)
Other political
affiliations
Labour and Co-operative (1968–2019)
Spouse(s)
Frances Smith (m. 1992–2004)
Children
  • Rebecca Gapes (1993–2012)
  • 2 other daughters
Alma materFitzwilliam College, Cambridge
Middlesex Polytechnic
Websitewww.mikegapes.org

Michael John Gapes (born 4 September 1952) is a British politician who has been the Member of Parliament (MP) for Ilford South since the 1992 general election. Gapes was a Labour MP until February 2019, when he left the party in protest at Jeremy Corbyn's leadership to form The Independent Group along with six other Labour MPs.

Early life and career[edit]

Mike Gapes was born in Wanstead Hospital, the son of postman Frank Gapes and shop assistant Emily Gapes. Mike Gapes and was educated at Staples Road Infants' School in Loughton and Manford County Primary School in Chigwell, before attending Buckhurst Hill County High School. He continued his studies at Fitzwilliam College, Cambridge, where he was awarded an MA in economics in 1975.[1] He also served as the Secretary of the Cambridge Students Union in 1973. He completed his education at Middlesex Polytechnic in Enfield where he earned a diploma in industrial relations in 1976,[2] after which he served as chair of the National Organisation of Labour Students before serving for three years as the student organiser for the Labour Party.[2] Gapes is a keen supporter of West Ham United F.C..

He worked as a Voluntary Service Overseas teacher in Swaziland in a gap year before attending university in 1972,[2] and for a few months as an administrator at Middlesex Hospital in 1976.

Personal life[edit]

He married Frances Smith in 1992:[2] they divorced in 2004. Their daughter Rebecca Gapes died of sudden arrhythmic death syndrome in 2012, at the age of 19.[3] He has two adult stepdaughters.

Political career[edit]

Labour Party[edit]

Mike Gapes was a founder member and convenor of the Clause Four Group in 1974, and the sixth Chair of the National Organisation of Labour Students from 1976 to 1977, taking over following the defeat of the entryist Trotskyist Militant tendency. In 1977 he was appointed as the first National Student Organiser of the Labour Party.

He worked at Labour Party Headquarters for 15 years from 1977 until 1992, including serving from 1988 to 1992 as International Secretary of the Labour Party,[4][5] and prior to that as a Policy Research Officer.[6] In 1981, he was a member of the anti-nuclear Labour Party Defence Study Group.[7] He told The Guardian that working with Neil Kinnock "to bring the Labour Party back from the abyss of 1983" was most influential in his political thinking.[8]

In his role as international secretary, in 1990 he (along with other MEPs associated with the Fabian Society) urged Kinnock and the Labour Party be more pro-European, including full economic and monetary union, a common industrial policy, replacing the Common Agricultural Policy with a "good food policy" promoting healthier diets with fewer additives, pesticides, and diversified croups, as well as a European Security Organisation based on NATO and Warsaw Pact co-operation.[9]

He unsuccessfully stood for election to Wandsworth Borough Council in the 1986 election for West Hill ward in Putney, losing by only 50 votes.

Gapes was a member of the Labour Party's National Policy Forum and Joint Policy Committee 1996–2005; Chair of the Co-operative Party's Parliamentary Group 2000–01, and Trade union liaison officer for the London Group of Labour MPs 2001–05.[10]

Parliamentary Candidate for Ilford North[edit]

He contested Ilford North at the 1983 General Election but was defeated by the sitting Conservative MP Vivian Bendall by some 11,201 votes.

Member of Parliament for Ilford South[edit]

He was elected to the House of Commons at the 1992 General Election for Ilford South when he defeated the sitting Conservative MP Neil Thorne by just 402 votes. He made his maiden speech on 8 May 1992.[11]

In Parliament he joined the Foreign Affairs Select Committee in 1992 and, after the 1997 General Election, he was appointed as the Parliamentary Private Secretary (PPS) to the Minister of State at the Northern Ireland Office Paul Murphy; he also worked for the other Minister of State Adam Ingram until 1999 when he joined the defence select committee. Following the 2001 General Election, he was again appointed a PPS to the Minister of State at the Home Office Jeff Rooker for a year. He rejoined the defence select committee in 2003. Following the 2005 General Election he served as the chairman of the foreign affairs select committee until 2010.

In 2007, the committee reported that it was "unlikely" any abuse was continuing at the Guantanamo Bay detention camp since 2004, calling the facilities "broadly comparable" to HM Prison Belmarsh (despite a basic failure of legal representation, recreation and education). Gapes said: "I thought that we would see detainees in orange overalls kept in cages, but they are now in modern blocks. The images from 2002 were of Camp X-Ray and that is now shut",[12] adding that an immediate shutdown of Guantanamo Bay would lead to a release of individuals back into society who were "dangerous".[13] Andrew Tyrie, chair of the all-party group on extraordinary rendition said the report was a "deep disappointment" and did not acknowledge the moral responsibility to British residents in Guantanamo; Clive Stafford Smith, who represented prisoners at the base, said the report was "full of factual errors" and based on a "show tour"[13] and Kate Allen, director of Amnesty International, called the report "a missed opportunity".[12]

He was re-elected at the 2010 General election but could not continue as Chair of the Select Committee because Labour lost the election. He was, however, re-elected to serve as a Labour member of the committee from 2010 to 2015, 2015–17, and after the 2017 General Election.

He has been an officer of many all party Parliamentary Groups: he is currently Chair of the All Party Crossrail Group, Chair of the Global Security and non Proliferation Group and Chair of the United Nations group. He was part of the Northern Ireland team which negotiated the Belfast Agreement in Belfast in 1998. He has travelled widely on parliamentary business including to Egypt, Israel, Palestine, Lebanon, Iraq, Kosovo, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Kuwait, Bahrain, Iran, China, Japan, Korea, Russia, India, Pakistan, South Africa, Angola, and Sierra Leone. In April 2018 Gapes visited Saudi Arabia: "To deepen understanding of Saudi Arabia and discuss issues of mutual concern." The visit, which cost £8,762, was paid in full by Saudi Arabia's Shura Council. According to Channel 4, Gapes is one of only 5 Labour MPs who have been on a fully paid visit to Saudi Arabia since March 2015, compared to 28 Conservative Party MPs.[14]

During the 2001 and 2005 General Election campaigns, he was the target of Muslim groups, including the Association of Ilford Muslims,[15] Islamic Society of Britain (Ilford Branch)[15] and the Muslim Public Affairs Committee UK,[16] who sought to unseat him because of his alleged pro-Israel and anti-Muslim bias.[15] He is a member of Labour Friends of Israel.[17]

Political views[edit]

Iraq[edit]

Regarding the Iraq War of 2003, Gapes voted in favour of the Blair government for the invasion of Iraq. He called the Chilcot Inquiry into the causes of the war a waste of public money, saying that it was a result of "hysterical" anti-Blair prejudice,[18] criticised Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn for apologising "on behalf of [the Labour Party] for the disastrous decision to go to war in Iraq",[19] and has argued that the Middle East (especially Iraq and Syria) are better off today following British and American intervention.[20]

United States[edit]

While under the presidency of Bill Clinton, Gapes asserted in 1998 that "... the United States Administration want[s] Europe to play a greater role in the Atlantic alliance—so do I—but that must happen incrementally; it must not be based on grand rhetoric. I want a stronger Euro-Atlantic partnership—a form of left Atlanticism in which Europe has a stronger voice."[21] However, the foreign affairs committee under his chairmanship argued for a re-evaluation of the so-called "special relationship", saying that "the use of the phrase" is "potentially misleading, and we recommend that its use should be avoided". Criticising Blair's closeness to Bush after 9/11, the committee said: "The perception that the British government was a subservient 'poodle' to the US administration leading up to the period of the invasion of Iraq and its aftermath is widespread both among the British public and overseas", saying such a perception was "deeply damaging to the reputation and interests of the UK."[22] Gapes argued that Britain ought to take a more pragmatic approach to the US than Britain has previously.[22]

House of Lords[edit]

In 2005, Gapes said he favoured abolishing the House of Lords and replacing it with "a strong committee system in the House of Commons and a small indirectly elected second chamber to represent the nations and regions of the UK".[8] He voted against the House of Lords Reform Bill 2012.[23]

European Union[edit]

Gapes has a high regard for the European Union, once declaring that he would prefer closer ties, rather than Britain becoming an amusement park for American and Japanese tourists. He introduced 36 amendments to the EU Referendum Bill of 2013.[24] The bill's proposer, James Wharton, alleged that the amendments were an attempt to use up the Parliamentary time allocated to the bill and prevent its being passed.[25] Gapes responded to allegations of filibustering by saying: "The important point is this: my amendments expose the Bill's inadequacy and need for proper consideration and scrutiny."[26] He voted against triggering Article 50[27]. In his election address in 2017, he pledged to be a strong pro-European Labour voice in Parliament and to campaign for the UK to stay in the Single Market and Customs Union.

In December 2017, Gapes delivered a speech to the House of Commons in which he warned that Brexit would put the production of Baileys Irish Cream, the milky whiskey liqueur, "in jeopardy."[28] The speech, in which he explained how Baileys is produced – that "And you have the milk that is taken from cows in the south and cows in the north, put together in the same factory, mixed together with whiskey, and comes out as Baileys..." – was described by Patrick Maguire in the New Statesman as "infinitely memeable and arguably made a punchline of one of the Independent Group's (TIG) most senior parliamentarians" when it was parodied by "the anarchic left podcast" Reel Politik.[29]

Kurds[edit]

Gapes is a long-standing advocate of Kurdish human rights. In the 2012–13 session of Parliament he signed an early day motion (EDM) for the Recognition of the Kurdish Genocide.[30] In November 2013, Gapes visited the Kurdistan region with the All-Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) on Kurdistan.[31] In June 2014, he defended the policy of humanitarian intervention to protect the Kurdish people in Iraq pursued by successive governments and called for the coalition government to support Kurdistan Region of Iraq.[32] In August he called for a recall of Parliament to authorise military support for Iraq.[33] Later that year, in November, Mike Gapes co-wrote an open letter to the Labour Party's base urging a significant increase in its support to the Kurds to defend themselves against the Islamic State (ISIL).[34]

Gapes intended to vote for the UK becoming involved with the bombing of ISIL in Syria on 2 December 2015, but was in hospital after suffering chest pains at the time of the vote.[35][36]

Pakistan[edit]

In 2018, Mike Gapes stated "Given the clear inability of this new Pakistani government of Imran Khan to stop these mobs from intimidating and killing Christians in Pakistan, is it not time to reassess our relations with Pakistan? There are big concerns if religious minorities in Pakistan are not safe."[37]

Russia[edit]

Mike Gapes is an outspoken critic of the Russian state. Gapes has spoken out against allegations of Russian interference several times in Parliament, including against the actions of the Russian state funded media outlets RT and Sputnik.[38] He has also called for the resignation of Jeremy Corbyn's director of communications Seumas Milne following comments Milne made doubting Russian state involvement in the poisoning of Sergei and Yulia Skripal.[39]

UKIP[edit]

Mike Gapes is a critic of the UK Independence Party. In April 2010, Gapes responded to news that Paul Wiffen – the then London Chairman of UKIP,[40] and a parliamentary candidate for Ilford South – had been reinstated after posting racist remarks on a social care website, by saying "There is an unpleasant whiff about Mr Wiffen."[41] He further criticised the conduct of Mr. Wiffen, saying: "Ilford did not need BNP-style extremism".[40] In April 2014, Mike Gapes said on his website that UKIP's posters were racist.[42][43]

Corbyn's leadership[edit]

Gapes is a long-time critic of current Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn, and has called Corbyn "the racist antisemite".[44] He has also criticised Corbyn's supporters, including the prominent group Momentum.[45][46] Gapes cites Corbyn's political views on issues such as foreign policy[47] and Brexit. In December 2015, he criticised the Labour Party on Twitter for a u-turn on whether to run a budget surplus in 'normal' economic conditions, saying "There is now no collective Shadow cabinet responsibility in our Party, no clarity on economic policy and no credible leadership."[46] This led to him being trolled by supporters of Corbyn online – many of whom told him to leave the party.[46] In the summer of 2018, there was speculation that Gapes might resign over the issue of antisemitism in the Labour Party.[48]

The Independent Group[edit]

On 18 February 2019, Mike Gapes and six other MPs – Chuka Umunna, Chris Leslie, Angela Smith, Luciana Berger, Gavin Shuker, and Ann Coffey – quit Labour in protest at Jeremy Corbyn's leadership to form the Independent Group. The Independent Group cited disagreements over the handling of Brexit and mishandling of anti-Semitism within the Labour party as key reasons for leaving.[49]

Publications[edit]

  • Clarke, Charles, David Griffiths, and Mike Gapes. Labour and Mass Politics: Rethinking our Strategy. Labour Co-ordinating Committee, 1982.
  • Gapes, Mike. "Labour's Defence and Security Policy." Rethinking the Nuclear Weapons Dilemma in Europe. Palgrave Macmillan, London, 1988. 341–355.
  • Gapes, Mike. "The Evolution of Labour's Defence and Security Policy." Burt (ed.) (1988): 82–105.
  • After the Cold War by Mike Gapes, 1990, Fabian Society, ISBN 0-7163-0540-2

References[edit]

  1. ^ Dod's Parliamentary Companion. University of Michigan. 2005. p. 168. Retrieved 16 March 2019.
  2. ^ a b c d "Candidate: Mike Gapes". Vote 2001. BBC News Online. 2001. Archived from the original on 9 July 2004. Retrieved 31 January 2017.
  3. ^ "MP's daughter Rebecca Gapes, 19, died suddenly in Canterbury student house". Kent Online. 16 August 2012. Archived from the original on 21 September 2016. Retrieved 31 January 2017.
  4. ^ "30 years ago today, I started working for the Labour Party – LabourList". LabourList – Labour's biggest independent grassroots e-network. 7 November 2014. Archived from the original on 17 June 2017. Retrieved 17 June 2017.
  5. ^ "Fall of the Berlin Wall: would Poland suffer, again? – Progress – News and debate from the progressive community". Archived from the original on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 17 June 2017.
  6. ^ "Mike Gapes". politics.co.uk. Archived from the original on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 17 June 2017.
  7. ^ Rhiannon Vickers (30 September 2011). The Labour Party and the World – Volume 2: Labour's Foreign Policy since 1951. Manchester University Press. p. 156. ISBN 978-1-84779-595-3.
  8. ^ a b "Mike Gapes". The Guardian. 4 April 2005. Archived from the original on 13 October 2015. Retrieved 13 March 2019.
  9. ^ Wintour, Patrick (17 September 1990). "Euro link urged by Labour MEPs". The Guardian. p. 2 – via Nexis. (Subscription required (help)).
  10. ^ "DODS People". www.dodspeople.com. Retrieved 17 June 2017.
  11. ^ Westminster, Department of the Official Report (Hansard), House of Commons,. "House of Commons Hansard Debates for 8 May 1992". www.publications.parliament.uk. Archived from the original on 21 November 2017. Retrieved 17 June 2017.
  12. ^ a b Swinford, Steven (21 January 2007). "Guantanamo no worse than Belmarsh, say MPs". The Sunday Times. Retrieved 12 March 2019. (Subscription required (help)).
  13. ^ a b Jones, George (22 January 2007). "Cuba camp on par with Belmarsh, say MPs". The Telegraph. Retrieved 12 March 2019.
  14. ^ Williams, Martin (18 October 2018). "Dozens of MPs flown to Riyadh in Saudi charm offensive". Channel 4 News. Archived from the original on 15 December 2018. Retrieved 24 February 2019.
  15. ^ a b c Westminster, Department of the Official Report (Hansard), House of Commons,. "House of Commons Hansard Debates for 4 Jul 2001 (pt 2)". www.publications.parliament.uk. Archived from the original on 22 December 2017. Retrieved 17 June 2017.
  16. ^ Bright, Martin (6 May 2010). "Muslim group's 'vicious abuse' of candidates". The Jewish Chronicle. Archived from the original on 24 February 2019. Retrieved 24 February 2019.
  17. ^ "LFI Supporters in Parliament". Labour Friends of Israel. Archived from the original on 16 January 2019. Retrieved 23 February 2019.
  18. ^ "Pro-Iraq War Labour MP attacks Tony Blair's 'hysterical' critics". The Independent. 29 October 2015. Archived from the original on 8 April 2016. Retrieved 12 March 2019.
  19. ^ Champion, Matthew (6 July 2016). "Jeremy Corbyn Apologises On Behalf Of Labour For The Iraq War". BuzzFeed. Archived from the original on 21 July 2017. Retrieved 12 March 2019.
  20. ^ Blackburn, Ralph (7 July 2016). "Mike Gapes on Chilcot: I will not apologise for voting for Iraq War". Ilford Recorder. Archived from the original on 19 February 2019. Retrieved 12 March 2019.
  21. ^ HC Deb, 27 November 1998, c477
  22. ^ a b Tran, Mark (28 March 2010). "UK special relationship with US is over, say MPs". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 13 September 2018. Retrieved 12 March 2019.
  23. ^ "House of Lords reform: Rebel MPs". BBC News. 11 July 2012. Archived from the original on 12 October 2016. Retrieved 13 March 2019.
  24. ^ "Tories defend EU referendum plan amid Labour blocking efforts". 8 November 2013. Archived from the original on 6 December 2017. Retrieved 17 June 2017 – via www.bbc.co.uk.
  25. ^ Sparrow, Andrew (8 November 2013). "MPs debate the EU referendum bill: Politics live blog". Archived from the original on 29 April 2017. Retrieved 17 June 2017 – via The Guardian.
  26. ^ Westminster, Department of the Official Report (Hansard), House of Commons,. "House of Commons Hansard Debates for 08 Nov 2013 (pt 0001)". www.publications.parliament.uk. Archived from the original on 26 October 2016. Retrieved 17 June 2017.
  27. ^ Mike Gapes's House of Commons intervention on 2/1/17 prior to voting [1]
  28. ^ Bell, Jonathan (6 December 2017). "Baileys in jeopardy over Brexit, MP warns". Belfast Telegraph. Archived from the original on 19 February 2019. Retrieved 18 February 2019.
  29. ^ Maguire, Patrick (1 March 2019). "'I've been through a divorce. I know what divorces are like': Mike Gapes on the pain of leaving Labour". New Statesman. Archived from the original on 12 March 2019. Retrieved 12 March 2019.
  30. ^ "Early day motion 1172 – RECOGNITION OF THE KURDISH GENOCIDE". UK Parliament. Archived from the original on 11 December 2017. Retrieved 17 June 2017.
  31. ^ "Mike Gapes MP on trip to the Kurdistan Region – APPG Kurdistan". www.appgkurdistan.org.uk. Archived from the original on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 17 June 2017.
  32. ^ Westminster, Department of the Official Report (Hansard), House of Commons,. "House of Commons Hansard Debates for 16 Jun 2014 (pt 0002)". www.publications.parliament.uk. Archived from the original on 3 December 2016. Retrieved 17 June 2017.
  33. ^ "Parliament should be recalled to authorise military support for Iraq". www.newstatesman.com. Archived from the original on 9 December 2015. Retrieved 17 June 2017.
  34. ^ "Taking on 'the vilest fascism of our age' – Progress – News and debate from the progressive community". Archived from the original on 10 June 2017. Retrieved 17 June 2017.
  35. ^ "Labour MP Gapes says he will rebel on Syria vote". BBC. 19 November 2015. Archived from the original on 22 November 2015. Retrieved 7 December 2015.
  36. ^ Ralph Blackburn (30 November 2015). "Ilford South MP Mike Gapes in hospital following emergency surgery". Ilford Recorder. Archived from the original on 4 December 2015. Retrieved 7 December 2015.
  37. ^ Wintour, Patrick (13 November 2018). "Foreign Office 'allowed Pakistan mob to dictate Asia Bibi asylum case'". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 15 November 2018. Retrieved 16 November 2018.
  38. ^ Gapes, Mike (21 December 2017). "Russian Interference in UK Politics". HC Deb. Archived from the original on 24 February 2019. Retrieved 23 February 2019.
  39. ^ Proctor, Kate (15 March 2018). "Labour rebellion mounts over Jeremy Corbyn's handling of nerve agent spy plot". Evening Standard. Archived from the original on 15 March 2018. Retrieved 13 March 2019.
  40. ^ a b "London chairman of Ukip suspended over racist remarks". 8 April 2010. Archived from the original on 22 May 2017. Retrieved 17 June 2017.
  41. ^ "BBC News – London UKIP election candidate in racism row". news.bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 17 June 2017.
  42. ^ "Why I say UKIP posters are racist". Archived from the original on 11 November 2014. Retrieved 11 November 2014.
  43. ^ "Why I say Ukip posters are racist". www.newstatesman.com. Archived from the original on 10 February 2017. Retrieved 17 June 2017.
  44. ^ Kennedy, Dominic; Fisher, Lucy; Elliott, Francis (25 August 2018). "Far-right comes out for Jeremy Corbyn". The Times. Archived from the original on 20 December 2018. Retrieved 12 March 2019. (Subscription required (help)).
  45. ^ "MP accuses Redbridge Momentum of 'absolutely disgusting antisemitism' over tweet". www.thejc.com. Archived from the original on 18 February 2019. Retrieved 17 February 2019.
  46. ^ a b c "'I AM LABOUR I AM LABOUR! Get it?' Mike Gapes Is Mad As Hell With The Corbynistas". HuffPost UK. 13 October 2015. Archived from the original on 18 February 2019. Retrieved 17 February 2019.
  47. ^ editor, Heather Stewart Political (14 March 2018). "Corbyn under fire from own MPs over response to PM's Russia statement". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Archived from the original on 18 February 2019. Retrieved 17 February 2019.
  48. ^ Merrick, Independent (25 August 2018). "Labour MP 'agonising every day' over whether to quit party amid latest Corbyn antisemitism row". Archived from the original on 25 August 2018. Retrieved 25 August 2018.
  49. ^ Marsh, Sarah (18 February 2019). "In their own words: why seven MPs are quitting Labour". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Archived from the original on 20 February 2019. Retrieved 19 February 2019.

External links[edit]

Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
Neil Thorne
Member of Parliament
for Ilford South

1992–present
Incumbent