Mike Guzovsky

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Mike Guzovsky, also known as Mike Guzofsky[1] and Yekutiel Ben-Ya'acov,[2] is an American-Israeli follower of the late Meir Kahane. According to the British Government, Guzovsky is a Jewish militant. He is a contact on Kahane.org, which is on the U.S. Treasury Department’s list of terrorist organizations.[3] He lives in the settlement of Kfar Tapuach in the West Bank.[2]

The Anti-Defamation League report that during the mid-90s Guzovsky was the leader of Kahane Chai (an offshoot of Kach[2]) in the United States, where he demonstrated against Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin and for Baruch Goldstein, who killed 29 Muslims.[4] When Rabin was assassinated in 1995, Guzovsky stated that "Rabin was bad for Jews" and said of his murderer, Yigal Amir, that "An intelligent man, one like this law student, had to act."[1]

He has organised peaceful resistance against the dismantlement of settlements.[2]

In 2005, Guzovsky said in the PBS documentary "Israel's Next War" that "We have thousands of civilians with the military know-how to instigate a mega-attack against Arabs, unidentified people, like Rabin's assassin, Yigal Amir, who can do such a deed. No matter how much the security service and the police harass us, it won't do them any good."[5] The British government say that Guzovsky is actively involved with military training camps, and that he is "considered to be engaging in unacceptable behaviour by seeking to foment, justify or glorify terrorist violence in furtherance of particular beliefs and to provoke others to terrorist acts."

Guzovsky is on the list of individuals banned from entering the United Kingdom.[6][7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b McAlary, Mike (6 November 1995). "THE HATE BEHIND THE GUN RABIN'S FOES HAIL 'HERO' KILLER". New York Daily News. Retrieved 2009-05-06. 
  2. ^ a b c d Izenberg, Dan (8 August 2005). "Traffic-blocking girls released after spending 39 days in custody". Jerusalem Post. Retrieved 2009-05-06. 
  3. ^ Popper, Nathaniel (12 August 2005). "Bus Attack Highlighting Links Of Israeli Extremists, Americans". Forward. Retrieved 2009-05-06. 
  4. ^ "Extremism in the Name of Religion: The Violent Record of the Kahane Movement and its Offshoots" (PDF). Anti-Defamation League. 1995. Retrieved 2009-05-06. 
  5. ^ Setton, Dan (2005). "Israel's Next War?". Frontline. PBS. Retrieved 2009-05-06. 
  6. ^ "Home Office name hate promoters excluded from the UK". Press Release. UK Home Office. 5.5.9. Retrieved 2009-05-06.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  7. ^ "Who is on UK 'least wanted' list?". BBC News. 5 May 2009. Retrieved 2009-05-06.