Mil Mi-38

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Mi-38
Mil Mi-38-2 (38013) at Moscow Zhukovsky.jpg
Mi-38 at HeliRussia 2011
Role Medium transport helicopter
Manufacturer Kazan Helicopter Plant
Design group Mil Moscow Helicopter Plant
First flight 22 December 2003
Introduction 30 December 2015

The Mil Mi-38 is a transport helicopter designed by Mil Moscow Helicopter Plant. Originally intended as a replacement for the Mil Mi-8 and the Mi-17, it is being marketed in both military and civil versions.[1] It flew for the first time on 22 December 2003 and was certified on 30 December 2015.[2]

Design and development[edit]

The manufacturer plans to provide the Mi-38 with a new Tranzas "glass cockpit" avionics system and new composite main rotor blades. The helicopter is offered with a pair of Klimov TV7-117V turboshaft engines. The second prototype, powered by Pratt & Whitney Canada PW127/TS engines, made its first flight in December 2010.[3] In 2013, the third prototype has been assembled at the Kazan Helicopter Plant.[4] Due to sanctions imposed on Russia however, Pratt & Whitney engines will not be offered in the definitive version.[5]

The Mil Mi-38 prototypes have already set five records in the E1h class. The second prototype aircraft set an altitude record by reaching 8,620 meters (28,280 feet) without a payload. The second and third records were for climbing speed; the Mi-38 reached a height of 3,000 meters (9,843 feet) in six minutes, then followed this to reach 6,000 meters (19,685 feet) in 10 minutes and 52 seconds. Two further records were altitude records: the first was set at 7,895 meters (25,902 feet) with a 1,000-kg (2,205-lb) payload, the second at 7,020 meters (23,031 feet) with a 2,000-kg (4,409-lb) payload.[6][7]

On 30 December 2015, Rosaviatsiya certified the Mi-38, completing the testing and certification program and allowing for the delivery of the first production model. Certification was based on the third and fourth flight-test prototypes with 2,500 shp Klimov TV7-117V engines.[8]

On 10 January 2018, the Kazan Helicopter Plant announced that serial production of the Mi-38 helicopter had started. Russian Armed Forces plans to purchase about 15 Mi-38 helicopters until 2020.[9]

On 23 November 2018, military variant, Mi-38T, performed its maiden flight.[10][11] Kazan Helicopters Deputy Managing Director Vadim Ligai stated that the Mi-38 can now carry up to 40 passengers.[12] Deliveries of the Mi-38T to the Russian Armed Forces are expected to begin in 2019.[13]

Specifications (Mi-38)[edit]

Data from Jane's all the World's Aircraft 2000–01[14]

General characteristics

  • Crew: 2
  • Capacity: 30 pax / 5,000 kg (11,023 lb) internal payload / 6,000 kg (13,228 lb) external payload
  • Length: 19.95 m (65 ft 5 in) excluding rotors
  • Height: 5.2 m (17 ft 1 in) to top of rotor head
  • Gross weight: 14,200 kg (31,306 lb)
  • Max takeoff weight: 15,600 kg (34,392 lb)
  • Powerplant: 2 × Klimov TVA-3000 turboshaft engines, 1,838 kW (2,465 hp) each
  • Main rotor diameter: 21.1 m (69 ft 3 in)
  • Main rotor area: 349.67 m2 (3,763.8 sq ft)

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 275 km/h (171 mph, 148 kn)
  • Cruise speed: 250 km/h (160 mph, 130 kn)
  • Range: 325 km (202 mi, 175 nmi) - 5,000 kg (11,023 lb) payload with 30 minutes reserve
530 km (330 mi; 290 nmi) - 4,500 kg (9,921 lb) payload (30 pax weith baggage) with 30 minutes reserve
1,300 km (810 mi; 700 nmi) - 1,800 kg (3,968 lb) payload with 30 minutes reserve and auxiliary fuel
  • Service ceiling: 6,500 m (21,300 ft)
  • Hover ceiling OGE: 2,500 m (8,202 ft)
  • Disk loading: 44.6 kg/m2 (9.1 lb/sq ft) max
  • Power/mass: 0.1675 kW/kg (0.1019 hp/lb)

See also[edit]

Aircraft of comparable role, configuration and era

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Second Mi-38 Prototype Begins Testing". Archived from the original on 25 December 2014. Retrieved 24 December 2014. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)[verification needed]
  2. ^ "Ростех :: Новости :: В преддверии HeliRussia 2013". Archived from the original on 25 December 2014. Retrieved 24 December 2014. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)[verification needed]
  3. ^ "Second Mi-38 Prototype Begins Testing". Archived from the original on 25 December 2014. Retrieved 24 December 2014. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  4. ^ "Ростех :: Новости :: В преддверии HeliRussia 2013". Archived from the original on 25 December 2014. Retrieved 24 December 2014. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  5. ^ http://www.military-today.com/helicopters/mi_38.htm
  6. ^ "Rotor & Wing". Archived from the original on 23 October 2014. Retrieved 24 December 2014. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  7. ^ "FAI Record ID #16621 - Helicopters 10-20 tonnes, Altitude with 2,000 kg payload Archived 2013-12-03 at the Wayback Machine" Fédération Aéronautique Internationale Record date 10 September 2012. Accessed: 29 November 2013.
  8. ^ Perry, Dominic (4 January 2016). "Russia certificates new Mi-38 helicopter". London: Flightglobal. Archived from the original on 26 January 2016. Retrieved 4 January 2016. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  9. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2018-02-22. Retrieved 2018-02-21. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  10. ^ "Первый полет опытного вертолета Ми-38Т для Министерства обороны России". bmpd.livejournal.com. 24 November 2018. Retrieved 14 December 2018.
  11. ^ "Archived copy". 27 November 2018. Archived from the original on 28 November 2018.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  12. ^ "Russia's first militarised Mi-38T transport helicopter makes maiden flight". Defence Blog. 2018-11-24. Retrieved 2019-08-06.
  13. ^ Jennings, Gareth (21 December 2018). "Russia to begin receiving Mi-38T upgraded helos in 2019". IHS Jane's 360. London. Archived from the original on 21 December 2018. Retrieved 23 December 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  14. ^ Jackson, Paul, ed. (2000). Jane's all the World's Aircraft 2000–01 (91st ed.). Coulsdon, Surrey, United Kingdom: Jane's Information Group. pp. 431–432. ISBN 978-0710620118.

The initial version of this article was based on material from aviation.ru. It has been released under the GFDL by the copyright holder.

External links[edit]