Milak, Sistan and Baluchestan

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Milak

ميلك
village
Milak is located in Iran
Milak
Milak
Coordinates: 30°58′12″N 61°48′33″E / 30.97000°N 61.80917°E / 30.97000; 61.80917Coordinates: 30°58′12″N 61°48′33″E / 30.97000°N 61.80917°E / 30.97000; 61.80917
Country Iran
ProvinceSistan and Baluchestan
CountyHirmand
BakhshCentral
Rural DistrictJahanabad
Elevation478 m (1,571 ft)
Population
 (2006)
 • Total2,385
Time zoneUTC+3:30 (IRST)
 • Summer (DST)UTC+4:30 (IRDT)

Milak (Persian: ميلك‎, also Romanized as Mīlak)[2] is a village in Jahanabad Rural District, in the Central District of Hirmand County, Sistan and Baluchestan Province, Iran. At the 2006 census, its population was 2,385, in 444 families.[3]

Milak is situated on the Afghanistan-Iran border. It is one of the major junctions that connects land-locked Afghanistan to international waters through Iran. After the collapse of the Taliban government in Afghanistan, Milak lost importance in the transit of goods to Afghanistan. In recent years, Afghanistan, Iran and India have agreed to reactivate the Milak route by building a new international logistics hub in Chabahar, connected to Milak.

In 2004, the governments of Iran and Afghanistan officially reopened the Milak-Zaranj border crossing,[4] which is heavily used today.[5]

There is also a project for a railway connection to Chabahar via Zahedan.

The Milak-Zaranj Bridge crosses the Helmand River.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2007-11-13. Retrieved 2009-06-24.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link) Location of Milak - Falling Rain Genomics
  2. ^ Milak can be found at GEOnet Names Server, at this link, by opening the Advanced Search box, entering "-3074997" in the "Unique Feature Id" form, and clicking on "Search Database".
  3. ^ "Census of the Islamic Republic of Iran, 1385 (2006)". Islamic Republic of Iran. Archived from the original (Excel) on 2011-11-11.
  4. ^ Iran Daily, February 24, 2005 Archived May 21, 2009, at the Wayback Machine
  5. ^ https://www.iom.int/sites/default/files/situation_reports/file/afghanistan_sr_20180826-0901.pdf
  6. ^ https://www.tribuneindia.com/news/nation/a-first-indian-wheat-in-afghan-city-via-chabahar/496293.html

External links[edit]