Milburn, Oklahoma

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Milburn, Oklahoma
Town
Location of Milburn, Oklahoma
Location of Milburn, Oklahoma
Coordinates: 34°14′28″N 96°33′2″W / 34.24111°N 96.55056°W / 34.24111; -96.55056Coordinates: 34°14′28″N 96°33′2″W / 34.24111°N 96.55056°W / 34.24111; -96.55056
Country United States
State Oklahoma
County Johnston
Area
 • Total 0.5 sq mi (1.2 km2)
 • Land 0.5 sq mi (1.2 km2)
 • Water 0.0 sq mi (0.0 km2)
Elevation 705 ft (215 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total 317
 • Density 654.2/sq mi (252.6/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code 73450
Area code(s) 580
FIPS code 40-48400[1]
GNIS feature ID 1095388[2]

Milburn is a town in Johnston County, Oklahoma, United States, along the Blue River. The population was 317 at the 2010 census, an increase of 1.6 percent from 312 at the 2000 census.[3] The town is notable as the location of the Chickasaw White House, the former home of Chickasaw Governor Douglas H. Johnston. This home is now a museum and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.[a]

History[edit]

A town named Ellen was formed in the Chickasaw Nation (Indian Territory) in 1856, about 3 miles (4.8 km) from the present town of Milburn. When the Western Oklahoma Railroad (later known as the Choctaw Oklahoma and Gulf Railroad) was built, W. J. Milburn, a druggist from Emet, Emet, persuaded the Chickasaw landowner,M. C. Condon, to give Milburn the power of attorney to negotiate a new townsite near the railroad. Milburn tried to persuade the postmaster at Ellen to move his location to the new site and rename it. He submitted the name Condon, which the Post Office rejected. Many names were proposed for the new town. Initially, the railroad wanted to name it Morris, then changed to McLish.[b]. Finally, the name Milburn was agreed upon in August, 1901..[4]

By 1904, Milburn had sufficient population to incorporate as a Chickasaw town. After Oklahoma became a state in 1907, an election was held to choose the new Johnston County seat. Milburn lost to Tishomingo.[4]

Geography[edit]

Milburn is located at 34°14′28″N 96°33′2″W / 34.24111°N 96.55056°W / 34.24111; -96.55056 (34.241030, -96.550601).[5]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 0.5 square miles (1.3 km2), all of it land.

Milburn is at the junction of SH 48A and SH 78, 8 miles (13 km) east of Tishomingo, Oklahoma, the seat of Johnston County.[6]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1910 438
1920 496 13.2%
1930 429 −13.5%
1940 442 3.0%
1950 350 −20.8%
1960 228 −34.9%
1970 275 20.6%
1980 376 36.7%
1990 264 −29.8%
2000 312 18.2%
2010 317 1.6%
Est. 2015 317 [7] 0.0%
U.S. Decennial Census[8]

As of the census[1] of 2000, there were 312 people, 114 households, and 84 families residing in the town. The population density was 654.2 people per square mile (251.0/km²). There were 124 housing units at an average density of 260.0 per square mile (99.7/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 88.78% White, 6.73% Native American, 0.32% from other races, and 4.17% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.96% of the population.

There were 114 households out of which 33.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.9% were married couples living together, 11.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.3% were non-families. 23.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.74 and the average family size was 3.30.

In the town, the population was spread out with 30.8% under the age of 18, 7.1% from 18 to 24, 28.5% from 25 to 44, 21.2% from 45 to 64, and 12.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 81.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 83.1 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $21,528, and the median income for a family was $29,375. Males had a median income of $24,375 versus $18,125 for females. The per capita income for the town was $10,322. About 24.7% of families and 29.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 29.3% of those under age 18 and 36.0% of those age 65 or over.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Emet was the original site of the Chickasaw White House, but now the house has a Milburn address.
  2. ^ Richard McLish was the railroad's townsite agent[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  2. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  3. ^ CensusViewer:Milburn, Oklahoma Population. Retrieved August 17, 2014.
  4. ^ a b c O'Dell, Larry. Milburn." Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture. Accessed November 22, 2015.
  5. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  6. ^ "Cities and Towns of Johnston County, Oklahoma." Genealogical History Trails. Accessed November 19, 2015.
  7. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2015". Retrieved July 2, 2016. 
  8. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015.