Military Order of the Cootie

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Military Order of the Cootie
Military Order of the Cootie logo.jpg
Abbreviation MOC
Established September 17, 1920; 97 years ago (1920-09-17)
Founders
  • Fred Madden
  • F. L. Gransbury
Founded at Washington, D.C.
Headquarters 604 Braddock Avenue,
Turtle Creek, Pennsylvania
Coordinates 40°24′18″N 79°49′46″W / 40.4049174°N 79.8294522°W / 40.4049174; -79.8294522
Region served
Worldwide
Emil Soltesz
Steve Ruger
Darin Combs
Parent organization
Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States
Website lotcs.org

The Military Order of the Cootie (officially known as the Military Order of the Cootie of the United States) is a national honor degree membership association separately constituted as a subordinate and as an auxiliary order chartered by the Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States (VFW).[1] The organization's services include supporting the VFW National Home for Children and veterans hospitals.[2] Founded in 1920, it became a subsidiary of the VFW in 1923.[3][4][5]

History[edit]

Pup Tent No. 1, Military Order of the Cootie, in Portland, Oregon, c. 2018

The Military Order of the Cootie (originally known as the Military Order of the Cootie, U.S.A.) was established on September 17, 1920, in Washington, D.C., by Fred Madden and F. L. Gransbury. The organization was modeled after the Imperial Order of the Dragon, an auxiliary to the United Spanish American War Veterans. The name "cootie" is a reference to the lice that plagued soldiers in World War I. Cooties were credited with keeping soldiers' heads down in the trenches.[6] A meeting of cooties is called a "scratch", the local chapter a "Pup Tent", the state affiliate a "Grand", and national headquarters at Turtle Creek, Pennsylvania, "The Supreme."[7]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States Congressional Charter, National By-Laws, Manual of Procedure and Ritual (2018 Podium ed.). Kansas City, Missouri: Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States. 2017. pp. 56–61. 
  2. ^ Simeone, Lisa (11 November 2000). "Profile: Military Order of the Cootie, a group of veterans that visits other veterans in hospitals". NPR Weekend Edition - Sunday. National Public Radio. Retrieved 19 September 2015 – via HighBeam Research. (Subscription required (help)). 
  3. ^ "Fun-loving veterans' group has 'cooties' - and is proud of it". The Virginian-Pilot. Norfolk, Virginia: McClatchy-Tribune Information Services. 7 April 2010. Retrieved 19 September 2015 – via HighBeam Research. (Subscription required (help)). 
  4. ^ Basinger, Rachel R. (13 November 2007). "'Cooties' Put Grins on Veterans' Faces". Pittsburgh Tribune-Review. Trib Total Media. Retrieved 19 September 2015 – via HighBeam Research. (Subscription required (help)). 
  5. ^ Whaley, Ramona (13 December 1987). "Cooties Serious About Smiles". Orlando Sentinel. Retrieved 19 September 2015. 
  6. ^ "'Cooties' elect new leaders, collect for hospitalized vets". The Avenue News. 16 May 2013. Retrieved 19 September 2015. 
  7. ^ McGinnis, Judith. "Order Of The Cootie: Social veteran group traces history to WWI". Longview News-Journal. Retrieved 19 September 2015. 

External links[edit]