Milko Djurovski

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Milko Djurovski
Personal information
Full name Milko Djurovski
Date of birth (1963-02-26) 26 February 1963 (age 54)
Place of birth Tetovo, SFR Yugoslavia
Height 1.78 m (5 ft 10 in)
Playing position Striker
Youth career
Teteks
1977–1979 Red Star Belgrade
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1979–1986 Red Star Belgrade 115 (54)
1979–1980 Čukarički (loan)
1986–1990 Partizan 70 (38)
1990–1993 Groningen 71 (28)
1993 Cambuur (loan) 7 (0)
1994 Maribor 19 (8)
1994 Nîmes 4 (0)
1995–1996 Železničar Maribor
1998 Kansas City Attack (indoor) 1 (0)
2001 Rogoza
2002 Bistrica 11 (16)
2002 Malečnik 1 (1)
2003 Rudar Prijedor
2003 Bistrica 3 (2)
2004 Ljubljana 2 (0)
2005 Malečnik
2005 Bežigrad
Total 304 (147)
National team
1984 Yugoslavia Olympic 2 (0)
1984–1985 Yugoslavia 6 (2)
1994 Macedonia 3 (0)
Teams managed
1998 Železničar Maribor
2003 Rudar Prijedor (player-manager)
2005 Malečnik (player-manager)
2005–2006 Drava Ptuj
2006–2007 Nafta Lendava
2007 Maribor
2008–2009 Vardar
2009 Belasica
2010 Drava Ptuj
2012 Pöllau
2015 Zlaté Moravce
2015 Zavrč
2016 Slavija Sarajevo
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.

Milko Djurovski (Macedonian: Милко Ѓуровски, also romanized as Milko Gjurovski, Serbo-Croatian: Milko Đurovski / Милко Ђуровски; born 26 February 1963) is a Yugoslav and Macedonian former footballer and current manager. He was regarded as one of the most talented Yugoslav players of his generation. Likewise, Djurovski is remembered for his eccentric behavior during his playing career that spanned for more than 25 years.

Djurovski started out at Red Star Belgrade, making his senior debut in 1979, aged 16. He spent a total of seven seasons in their first team, winning two national championships (1981 and 1984) and two national cups (1982 and 1985). In the summer of 1986, Djurovski made a surprising and controversial move to Red Star's bitter rivals Partizan.[1] He stayed for four years at Stadion JNA, including an inactive season because of his compulsory military service. Some of his most memorable performances with the Crno-beli include a 1989–90 European Cup Winners' Cup tie against Groningen, which eventually secured him a transfer to the Dutch club in 1990.[2] In his later years, Djurovski went on to play for several Slovenian clubs.

Internationally, Djurovski represented both Yugoslavia and Macedonia.[3] He earned six caps for Yugoslavia between 1984 and 1985, scoring two goals. After the dissolution of the former country, Djurovski briefly played for his native Macedonia, making three appearances in 1994. He had previously won the bronze medal for Yugoslavia at the 1984 Summer Olympics.

His older brother is Boško Djurovski, while his younger son is Mario Djurovski.[4]

Club career[edit]

Born in Tetovo, Djurovski joined the youth categories of his hometown club Teteks. He subsequently moved to Red Star Belgrade in 1977.[5] Still a junior, Djurovski made his senior debut for the club on 11 April 1979, coming on as a substitute for Duško Lukić in the first leg of the UEFA Cup semi-final, a 1–0 win over Hertha BSC. He spent the following 1979–80 season on loan at Čukarički, becoming the Serbian League (Group North) top scorer with 15 goals.[6] After returning from a loan spell, Djurovski helped Red Star win the Yugoslav First League in the 1980–81 campaign, scoring five goals in the process. He was an integral part of the team and a fan favorite in the following years, leading them to another league title in 1984.

In the summer of 1986, Djurovski switched to Partizan in a move that caused much controversy among fans and the general public.[7] He immediately established himself as the club's key player, being their top scorer in the 1986–87 season, as Partizan won the league title. Afterwards, Djurovski spent the following three seasons with the Crno-beli, including one year of his military service.

In the summer of 1990, Djurovski moved abroad and signed with Dutch club Groningen. He was the club's top league scorer in his debut season at Oosterpark with 14 goals, leading them to a third place, behind PSV and Ajax. In the following 1991–92 season, Djurovski again helped the club to secure a spot in the UEFA Cup. He was then loaned to fellow Eredivisie club Cambuur in 1993. After returning to Groningen, Djurovski spent another few months at the club, before eventually leaving the country in the winter of 1994.

After leaving Groningen, Djurovski moved to the newly independent Slovenia and signed with Maribor in early 1994. He later moved to French side Nîmes, but left the club after only a few games in December 1994. Later on, Djurovski made a return to Slovenia and joined Second League club Železničar Maribor in the summer of 1995. He then moved to the United States and briefly played indoor soccer for the Kansas City Attack in 1998, alongside his former Partizan teammate Nebojša Vučićević.[8]

In the early 2000s, Djurovski came out of retirement and went on to play for Slovenian Third League clubs Rogoza, Bistrica (twice) and Malečnik. He then served as player-manager of Bosnian club Rudar Prijedor in 2003.[9] Afterwards, Djurovski made two appearances for Ljubljana in the First League, before the club dissolved at the end of the 2004–05 season. He later served as player-manager of Malečnik,[10][11] before joining newly formed Slovenian club Bežigrad in July 2005.[12] Djurovski appeared in a couple of matches for the club, before definitely retiring from the game, aged 42.[13]

International career[edit]

Djurovski made his full international debut for Yugoslavia on 31 March 1984, coming on as a substitute for Miloš Šestić and scoring the game's opener in a 2–1 friendly win over Hungary. He subsequently represented the country at the 1984 Summer Olympics, as the team won the bronze medal, defeating Italy in the third place match.[14] In 1985, Djurovski made five more appearances for the senior team and scored once.

In 1994, Djurovski accepted a call up to represent the country of his birth. He made three appearances for Macedonia, but failed to make an impact.

Managerial career[edit]

After his stint at Železničar Maribor as a player, Djurovski was appointed manager of the club ahead of the 1998–99 season. He was eventually unable to perform his function due to the problems with his license.[15]

In October 2005, Djurovski was appointed manager of Drava Ptuj.[16] He left the club in July 2006.[17] Shortly after, Djurovski was appointed manager of Nafta Lendava.[18] He left them in August 2007.[19] Two weeks later, Djurovski became manager of his former club Maribor, penning a two-year deal.[20] He was released on 5 November 2007.[21][22] In October 2008, Djurovski returned to his native country, being named manager of Vardar.[23] He left the club in January 2009.[24] Later that year, Djurovski served as manager of fellow Macedonian club Belasica.[25]

Subsequently, Djurovski returned to Slovenia and took charge at Drava Ptuj for the second time, before leaving the position in April 2010.[26] He also served as manager of Austrian club Pöllau in 2012.[27] In June 2015, Djurovski was appointed manager of Slovakian club Zlaté Moravce.[28] He once again returned to Slovenia and took charge at Zavrč in October 2015.[29] In March 2016, Djurovski became manager of Bosnian club Slavija Sarajevo. He left the club only two months later after failing to avoid relegation from the top flight.[30]

Personal life[edit]

Djurovski has two sons, Marko Djurovski (b. 1983), an RnB singer, and Mario Djurovski (b. 1985), a professional footballer.[31] He is also the younger brother of Boško Djurovski. They played together at both club and international level.

Statistics[edit]

Club[edit]

Club Season League Continental Total
Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals
Red Star Belgrade 1978–79 1 0 1 0 2 0
Čukarički (loan) 1979–80
Red Star Belgrade 1980–81 9 5 1 0 10 5
1981–82 19 8 4 0 23 8
1982–83 15 6 2 2 17 8
1983–84 27 13 2 1 29 14
1984–85 23 9 0 0 23 9
1985–86 21 13 2 1 23 14
Partizan 1986–87 31 19 0 0 31 19
1987–88 16 9 1 0 17 9
1988–89 0 0 0 0 0 0
1989–90 23 10 6 4 29 14
Groningen 1990–91 28 14 28 14
1991–92 25 7 2 0 27 7
1992–93 4 2 1 0 5 2
Cambuur (loan) 1992–93 7 0 7 0
Groningen 1993–94 14 5 14 5
Maribor 1993–94 9 4 0 0 9 4
1994–95 10 4 2 3 12 7
Nîmes 1994–95 4 0 4 0
Železničar Maribor 1995–96
Kansas City Attack (indoor) 1997–98 1 0 1 0
Rogoza 2000–01
Bistrica 2001–02 11 16 11 16
Malečnik 2002–03 1 1 1 1
Rudar Prijedor 2002–03
Bistrica 2003–04 3 2 3 2
Ljubljana 2004–05 2 0 2 0
Malečnik 2004–05
Bežigrad 2005–06
Career total 304 147 24 11 328 158

International[edit]

National team Year Apps Goals
Yugoslavia 1984 1 1
1985 5 1
Total 6 2
Macedonia 1994 3 0
Total 3 0

Honours[edit]

Club[edit]

Red Star Belgrade
Partizan

International[edit]

Yugoslavia

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Milko Đurovski: I Zvezda i Partizan" (in Serbian). mondo.rs. 23 October 2010. Retrieved 22 May 2016. 
  2. ^ "DOGODILO SE NA DANAŠNJI DAN: Milko je uništio Ponos severa, a onda su oni odlučili da ga kupe... (VIDEO)" (in Serbian). mozzartsport.com. 1 November 2014. Retrieved 22 May 2016. 
  3. ^ "Players Appearing for Two or More Countries". rsssf.com. Retrieved 22 May 2016. 
  4. ^ "Milko Đurovski danas u loži „Marakane"" (in Serbian). blic.rs. 18 April 2007. Retrieved 22 May 2016. 
  5. ^ "EP 1984: Milena, Marko i Milko Đurovski, porodično - Bilo bi mu lakše da u Francuskoj igra i Boško" (in Serbian). yugopapir.com. June 2016. Retrieved 24 October 2016. 
  6. ^ "85 godina SD Čukarički" (in Serbian). pageflip-flap.com. Retrieved 22 May 2016. 
  7. ^ "Milko Đurovski, nesuđena šesta Zvezdina zvezda" (in Serbian). novimagazin.rs. 28 June 2012. Retrieved 22 May 2016. 
  8. ^ "NATIONAL PROFESSIONAL SOCCER LEAGUE FINAL OFFICIAL STATISTICS -- 1997-1998". kenn.com. Retrieved 6 February 2017. 
  9. ^ "Niko da obuče Piksijev dres" (in Serbian). blic.rs. 13 March 2003. Retrieved 6 February 2017. 
  10. ^ "Hajdukovac Filip i Milko Đurovski" (in Croatian). slobodnadalmacija.hr. 26 June 2005. Retrieved 6 February 2017. 
  11. ^ "Nikici Jelaviću iskočilo koljeno" (in Croatian). slobodnadalmacija.hr. 7 July 2005. Retrieved 6 February 2017. 
  12. ^ "Obetaven začetek nove Olimpije" (in Slovenian). rtvslo.si. 30 July 2005. Retrieved 22 May 2016. 
  13. ^ "INTERVJU NEDELJOM - Milko Đurovski: Ne želim da me stavljaju u isti koš sa igračima Zvezde posle 1991! (VIDEO)" (in Serbian). mozzartsport.com. 23 November 2014. Retrieved 22 May 2016. 
  14. ^ "OI Los Anđeles '84, utisci osvajača medalja: Zlato za rukometaše i vaterpoliste, bronza za fudbalere!" (in Serbian). yugopapir.com. September 2014. Retrieved 24 October 2016. 
  15. ^ "Železničarsko športno društvo Maribor 1927 – 2007" (PDF) (in Slovenian). navdih.net. Retrieved 22 May 2016. 
  16. ^ "Djurovski bo zamenjal Lušića" (in Slovenian). rtvslo.si. 4 October 2005. Retrieved 22 May 2016. 
  17. ^ "Djurovski ni več trener Drave" (in Slovenian). dnevnik.si. 19 July 2006. Retrieved 22 May 2016. 
  18. ^ "Djurovski novi trener Nafte" (in Slovenian). dnevnik.si. 22 August 2006. Retrieved 22 May 2016. 
  19. ^ "Šestici usodni za oba trenerja" (in Slovenian). rtvslo.si. 13 August 2007. Retrieved 22 May 2016. 
  20. ^ "Vijoličaste bo dve leti vodil Djurovski" (in Slovenian). rtvslo.si. 23 August 2007. Retrieved 22 May 2016. 
  21. ^ "Djurovski zapušča Ljudski vrt" (in Slovenian). rtvslo.si. 5 November 2007. Retrieved 22 May 2016. 
  22. ^ "Milko Djurovski" (in Slovenian). rtvslo.si. 2 March 2016. Retrieved 22 May 2016. 
  23. ^ "Milko Gjurovski to take over Vardar". macedonianfootball.com. 31 October 2008. Retrieved 22 May 2016. 
  24. ^ "Miko Popovic takes over Vardar". macedonianfootball.com. 27 January 2009. Retrieved 22 May 2016. 
  25. ^ "Milko Gjurovski takes over Belasica". macedonianfootball.com. 16 July 2009. Retrieved 22 May 2016. 
  26. ^ "Djurovski ni več trener Ptujčanov" (in Slovenian). rtvslo.si. 12 April 2010. Retrieved 22 May 2016. 
  27. ^ "Pöllau trennt sich von Djurovski" (in German). fanreport.com. 7 November 2012. Retrieved 22 May 2016. 
  28. ^ "Z. Moravce povedie Djurovski, v tíme aj legionári na čele s Tawambom" (in Slovak). profutbal.sk. 15 June 2015. Retrieved 22 May 2016. 
  29. ^ "Djurovski je zamenjal Paculta" (in Slovenian). nogomania.com. 24 October 2015. Retrieved 22 May 2016. 
  30. ^ "Milko Đurovski napustio Slaviju" (in Bosnian). sportsport.ba. 16 May 2016. Retrieved 22 May 2016. 
  31. ^ "Milko Đurovski - izdajnik, heroj i pevač" (in Serbian). mondo.rs. 2 July 2012. Retrieved 22 May 2016. 

External links[edit]