Millbillillie (meteorite)

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Millbillillie
MillbillillieMeteorite.jpg
A 175 grams (6.2 oz) individual of the Millbillillie meteorite shower, a eucrite achondrite that fell in Australia in 1960. This specimen is approx. 6 centimetres (2.4 in) wide. Note the shiny black fusion crust with flow lines. The chip at lower right allows one to see the light-gray interior. The orange staining at top is a result of weathering, as these stones were not recovered until many years after they fell.
Type Achondrite
Clan HED meteorites[1]
Group Eucrite[1]
Parent body Possibly 4 Vesta[1]
Country Australia[1]
Region Millbillillie & Jundee Stations, Wiluna district, Western Australia[1]
Coordinates 26°27′S 120°22′E / 26.450°S 120.367°E / -26.450; 120.367Coordinates: 26°27′S 120°22′E / 26.450°S 120.367°E / -26.450; 120.367[1]
Observed fall Yes[1]
Fall date 1960-10[1]
Found date 1970[1]
TKW 330 kilograms (730 lb)[1]
Strewn field Yes[1]
Meteorite oriented Millbillillie.jpg
77 grams (2.7 oz) oriented specimen of the Millbillillie eucrite meteorite.
Commons page Related media on Wikimedia Commons

Millbillillie meteorite is a meteorite named after the cattle station in Australia on which it fell in October 1960.[1] It is classified as a eucrite achondrite, a kind of stony meteorite.

History[edit]

21.78 grams (0.768 oz) complete specimen.

A fireball was observed "with sparks coming off it" by two stationworkers while they were opening a gate in the boundary fence on a track between Millbillillie and Jundee cattle stations.[1] The object fell on a plain to the north.[1] No search was made at the time but in 1970 and 1971 locals found two stones; Aboriginals have found others since.[1] The largest stone weighed 20 kilograms (44 lb).[1] It and a smaller one of 565 grams (19.9 oz) are held by the Western Australian Museum.[1]

As of January 2013 pieces of Millbillillie were on sale for around US$22/g.[2]

Mineralogy[edit]

Classification[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q "Millbillillie". Meteoritical Bulletin Database. Meteoritical Society. Retrieved 7 January 2013. 
  2. ^ "MILLBILLILLIE – A WITNESSED FALL". STONE METEORITES FOR SALE. AEROLITE METEORITES, LLC. Retrieved 7 January 2013.