Millennium Technology Prize

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
The Millennium Technology Prize
Millenium Technology Prize logo.gif
Awarded for Life-enhancing technological innovation
Country Finland
Presented by Technology Academy Finland
Reward €1 million
First awarded 2004
Official website taf.fi/en/millennium-technology-prize/

The Millennium Technology Prize (Finnish: Millennium-teknologiapalkinto; formerly known as the Walter Ahlström Prize) is one of the world's largest technology prizes.[1][2][3] It is awarded once every two years by Technology Academy Finland, an independent fund established by Finnish industry and the Finnish state in partnership. The prize is presented by the President of Finland. It is awarded in recognition of technological innovations that contribute to the improved quality of human life and encourage sustainable development. The prize was inaugurated in 2004.[2]

The Prize[edit]

The idea of the prize came originally from the Finnish academician Pekka Jauho, with American real estate investor and philanthropist Arthur J Collingsworth encouraging its establishment.[4] The Prize celebrates innovations that have a favorable and sustainable impact on quality of life and well-being of people.[5] The innovations also must have been applied in practice and stimulate further research and development.[5] Compared to the Nobel Prize the Millennium Prize is a technology award, whereas the Nobel Prize is a science award.[2] Furthermore, the Nobel Prize is awarded for basic research, but the Millennium Prize may be given to a recently conceived innovation which is still being developed. The Millennium Prize is not intended as a reward for lifetime achievement.[5]

The Millennium Prize is awarded by Technology Academy Finland (formerly Millennium Prize Foundation and Finnish Technology Award Foundation), established in 2002 by eight Finnish organisations supporting technological development and innovation. The prize sum is 1 million euros (~US$ 1.3 million).[5] The Millennium Technology Prize is awarded every second year[5] and is presented by the president of Finland.[6] The Millennium Technology Prize is the world's largest technology award.[1][2][3] The predecessor to the Millennium Prize was the Walter Ahlström prize.

Universities, research institutes, national scientific and engineering academies and high-tech companies around the world are eligible to nominate individuals or groups for the award, excluding military technology.[5] In accordance with the rules of the Technology Academy Finland, a proposal concerning the winner of the Millennium Technology Prize is made to the board of the foundation by the eight-member international selection committee, and the final decision on the prize winner is made by the board.

International Selection Committee[edit]

Current members of the selection committee:[7]

Winners[edit]

Year Inventor Nationality Invention Notes
1994 Bodo Linnhoff  Germany Helping the Environment Inventor of Pinch Analysis, a technique for minimizing energy usage in the process industries. In its early days, the technique helped companies such as ICI and BASF to design plants that used roughly 30% less energy. As of the 1990s, Pinch Analysis became industrial standard in the oil refining and petrochemical industries.
Name changes to the Millennium Technology Prize
2004 Tim Berners-Lee  United Kingdom World Wide Web Inventor of the World Wide Web from United Kingdom, was announced on April 15, 2004 as the first laureate of the award. The Prize was presented to Berners-Lee at a ceremony in the Finlandia Hall in Helsinki by the President of Finland, Tarja Halonen on June 15, 2004. Selection committee studied 78 nominations from 22 countries for the 2004 prize.
2006 Shuji Nakamura  Japan (born)
 United States (citizen)
Blue and white LEDs Inventor of high brightness blue and white LEDs used in lighting, computer displays and new-generation DVDs, from California, United States, was announced on June 15, 2006 as the second laureate of the award.[8] The Prize was presented to Nakamura at a ceremony in the Helsinki Fair Centre in Helsinki by the President of Finland Tarja Halonen on September 8, 2006. Selection committee studied 109 nominations from 32 countries for the 2006 prize.
2008 Robert Langer  United States Innovative biomaterials Inventor of controlled drug release from the United States, was announced on June 11, 2008 as the third laureate of the award. The prize 800,000 euros was presented to Langer at a ceremony in Helsinki by the President of Finland Tarja Halonen "for his invention and development of innovative biomaterials for controlled drug release and tissue regeneration that have saved human lives and improved the lives of millions of patients."[9] The other 2008 Millennium Laureates, Alec Jeffreys and Andrew Viterbi and the group of Emmanuel Desurvire, Randy Giles and David N. Payne, were each awarded prizes of 115,000 euros.[9]
2010 Michael Grätzel   Switzerland Dye-sensitized solar cells Inventor of third generation dye-sensitized solar cells. The president of Finland Tarja Halonen handed the 800,000 euros Grand Prize and the prize trophy "Peak" to Grätzel at the Grand Award Ceremony at the Finnish National Opera in Helsinki on 9 June 2010. The two other 2010 Millennium Laureates, Richard Friend and Stephen Furber, were each awarded prizes of 150,000 euros.[10]
2012 Linus Torvalds  Finland (born)
 United States (citizen)
Linux kernel Committee's reasoning: "for creating the Linux kernel, a new open source operating system for computers. 73,000 man years have been spent fine-tuning the code. Today millions use computers, smartphones and digital video recorders that run on Linux. Linus Torvalds’s achievements have had a great impact on shared software development, networking and the openness of the web."[11]
Shinya Yamanaka  Japan Induced pluripotent stem cell Committee's reasoning: "in recognition of his discovery of a new method to develop induced pluripotent stem cells for medical research. Using his method to create stem cells, scientists all over the world are making great strides in research in medical drug testing and biotechnology. This should one day lead to the successful growth of implant tissues for clinical surgery and combating intractable diseases such as cancer, diabetes and Alzheimer’s."[11]
2014 Stuart Parkin  United Kingdom Advances in magnetic storage capacity Committee's reasoning: "in recognition of his discoveries, which have enabled a thousand-fold increase in the storage capacity of magnetic disk drives. Parkin’s innovations have led to a huge expansion of data acquisition and storage capacities, which in turn have underpinned the evolution of large data centres and cloud services, social networks, music and film distribution online."[12]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Shannon, Victoria (June 14, 2004). "Pioneer Who Kept the Web Free Honored With a Technology Prize". The New York Times. Retrieved April 10, 2014. "Mr. Berners-Lee will finally be recognized, with the award of the world's largest technology prize, the Millennium Technology Prize from the Finnish Technology Award Foundation" 
  2. ^ a b c d "Top prize for 'light' inventor". BBC News. September 8, 2006. Retrieved April 10, 2014. "The Millennium Technology Prize is the world's largest technology award, equivalent to the Nobel Prizes for science" 
  3. ^ a b "Shuji Nakamura, inventor of bright LED lights, gets Millennium Prize". Helsingin Sanomat. June 16, 2006. Retrieved April 10, 2014. "It is the world’s largest prize for technology" 
  4. ^ Millennium, Finnfacts.com (Archive.org)
  5. ^ a b c d e f "Millennium Technology Prize". Technology Academy Finland. Retrieved April 10, 2014. 
  6. ^ "‘Big data’ pioneer wins Millennium Technology Prize". Yle Uutiset. April 9, 2014. Retrieved April 10, 2014. 
  7. ^ "International Selection Committee". Technology Academy Finland. Retrieved April 10, 2014. 
  8. ^ "2006 MILLENNIUM TECHNOLOGY PRIZE AWARDED TO UCSB'S SHUJI NAKAMURA" (Press release). University of California, Santa Barbara. June 15, 2006. Retrieved April 10, 2014. 
  9. ^ a b "2008 Millennium Technology Prize awarded to Professor Robert Langer for intelligent drug delivery" (Press release). University of Leicester. June 11, 2008. Retrieved April 10, 2014. 
  10. ^ "The Millennium Technology Prize: PROFESSOR GRÄTZEL WINS THE 2010 MILLENNIUM TECHNOLOGY GRAND PRIZE FOR DYE-SENSITIZED SOLAR CELLS". Technology Academy Finland. June 6, 2010. Archived from the original on October 12, 2011. Retrieved April 10, 2014. 
  11. ^ a b "Stem cell scientist and open source software engineer are named joint winners of the 2012 Millennium Technology Prize" (Press release). Technology Academy Finland. June 13, 2012. Retrieved April 10, 2014. 
  12. ^ "Physicist Stuart Parkin wins 2014 Millennium Technology Prize for opening big data era" (Press release). Technology Academy Finland. April 9, 2014. Retrieved April 10, 2014. 

External links[edit]