Miller oilfield

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Miller field
Miller oilfield is located in North Sea
Miller oilfield
Location of Miller field
Country Scotland, United Kingdom
Location Central North Sea
Block 16/7b, 16/8b
Offshore/onshore Offshore
Coordinates 58°45′N 1°20′E / 58.75°N 1.33°E / 58.75; 1.33Coordinates: 58°45′N 1°20′E / 58.75°N 1.33°E / 58.75; 1.33
Operator BP (1982–...)
Partners BP
ConocoPhillips
Shell
Field history
Discovery 1983
Start of production 1992
Peak year 1995-6
Abandonment 2007
Production
Peak of production (oil) 150,000 barrels per day (~7.5×10^6 t/a)

The Miller oilfield is a deep reservoir under the North Sea, 240 kilometres north-east of Peterhead in UKCS Blocks 16/7b and 16/8b. It was discovered in 1983 by BP[1] in a water depth of 100 metres. Production from Miller field started in June 1992, and plateau production was from late 1992 to 1997 at rates of up to 150,000 barrels (24,000 m3) of oil and 255 mmscf of gas per day. Miller produced some 345 million barrels (54,900,000 m3) of oil during its lifetime.

The Miller field reached the end of its economic oil and gas producing life in 2007 when Cessation of Production (CoP) approval was received from the UK government. Preparations are currently under way to decommission the Miller platform, but the oil and gas pipelines will be preserved for future opportunities. [2]

On 1 April 2009, sixteen people were killed in the crash of a helicopter carrying workers from the Miller field back to Aberdeen.

Geology[edit]

The reservoir consists of Upper Jurassic Brae Formation turbidites, 2 km deep, in the South Viking graben.[3] The Kimmeridge Clay Formation is the source rock.[4]

Reservoir[edit]

The Miller reservoir is located at a depth of 4,090 metres (13,420 ft) below sea level, it has an estimated area of 45 square kilometres (17 sq mi) and a maximum thickness of 110 metres (360 ft). Reservoir pressure is 45,000 kilopascals (6,500 psi) and reservoir temperature is 121°C.[5]

As of 1999, BP estimated the total recoverable reserves from the field to be 335 million barrels (53,300,000 m3) of oil and 505 billion cubic feet (14.3×10^9 m3) of natural gas. Total oil in place for the reservoir is 620 million barrels (99,000,000 m3).[5]

Development[edit]

Export pipelines[edit]

Gas export from Miller was via a sour gas pipeline system (Miller Gas System) comprising a 241 km, 30-inch-diameter (760 mm) sealine to St Fergus and then on via a 17.5 km 26-inch-diameter (660 mm) landline to Peterhead Power Station.

Miller oil was pumped via a 7.5 km-long, 18-inch-diameter (460 mm) export pipeline to the Brae A platform and then onwards via the Forties pipeline system to the mainland.

In 2003, BP constructed a new 8.5 km, 16-inch-diameter (410 mm) gas pipeline between the Brae B and Miller platforms to allow gas to be exported from Brae to Miller for use in the Miller Field EOR (Enhanced Oil Recovery) scheme.

Decommissioning[edit]

Formal cessation of production for the Miller field was approved by the DECC in September 2007. In 2009, BP estimated the gross cost of decommissioning the field to be of the order of £300 million.[6]

The initial phase of decommissioning activities involving well abandonment and topsides cleanup were completed by the end of 2009.[6] The oil and gas export pipelines have been flushed clear of hydrocarbons and are being left in place for potential future use. The Miller platform topside and jacket will remain in place for several years while detailed plans for their removal are developed. The Jigsaw search and rescue helicopter will remain on the Miller platform during this period with minimum staffing to continue to support search and rescue operations.[7]

Carbon sequestration[edit]

BP developed plans to reuse the structure for deep carbon sequestration.[8][9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ McClure, N.M., and Brown, A.A., Miller Field, 1992, in Giant Oil and Gas Fields of the Decade, 1978-1988, AAPG Memoir 54, Halbouty, M.T., editor, Tulsa: American Association of Petroleum Geologists, ISBN 0891813330, pp. 307-322
  2. ^ BP North Sea Website : http://www.bpnsi.com/index.asp?id=7369643D312669643D313130
  3. ^ McClure, N.M., and Brown, A.A., Miller Field, 1992, in Giant Oil and Gas Fields of the Decade, 1978-1988, AAPG Memoir 54, Halbouty, M.T., editor, Tulsa: American Association of Petroleum Geologists, ISBN 0891813330, pp. 307-322
  4. ^ McClure, N.M., and Brown, A.A., Miller Field, 1992, in Giant Oil and Gas Fields of the Decade, 1978-1988, AAPG Memoir 54, Halbouty, M.T., editor, Tulsa: American Association of Petroleum Geologists, ISBN 0891813330, pp. 307-322
  5. ^ a b BP Asset Portfolio - The Miller Field (PDF), BP, 2003 
  6. ^ a b Miller Decommissioning Programme (PDF), BP, September 2011 
  7. ^ "Miller Decommissioning". BP.com. BP. Retrieved 22 December 2012. 
  8. ^ Nicole Branan "More answers — and questions — about carbon storage" Geotimes February 2008
  9. ^ "BP And Partners Plan Clean Energy Plant in Scotland, Increasing Oil Recovery And Reducing Emissions" 20 June 2005 (press release)