Millersburg Glass Company

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The Millersburg Glass Company was started in 1908 by John W Fenton in Millersburg, OH.[1]

History[edit]

In early 1908 John W. Fenton left the Fenton Art Glass Company after a falling out with his brother Frank Fenton.[2] Though he remained on the Fenton board of directors.[3] He had helped found Fenton Art Glass with his brother in 1905 .[2]
The Millersburg factory was located in Millersburg, OH and was constructed quickly.[3] The factory was state of the art for its day and opened in 1909.[3] John was not the best businessman, he was more of a promoter.[3] The factory was in an obscure location and the company folded in 1911.[1] The company was sold to Samuel Fair and was reopened as the Radium Glass Company.[1] This company only lasted one year and closed in 1912.[1]

Colors[edit]

The company is well known for its Carnival glass.[1] Its first carnival color was Radium.[3] It is known for its bright and shiny finish.[3] The main colors made by Millerburg are green, amethyst, and marigold. They also made vaseline, blue,[1] lavender, and aqua.[4]

Patterns[edit]

Millersburg often would develop patterns from those that they had made before.[1] They also used different patterns on the inside and outside of a piece.[1]

Name Description Reference
Acorn A pattern used for compotes. Known colors include green, vaseline, amethyst, and marigold. [5]
Big Fish A pattern that is close to the Trout and Fly pattern made by Millersburg. Made in bowl shapes in green, vaseline, amethyst, and marigold. [6]
Big Thistle Only two known items have this patter. Both are punch bowls in the amethyst color [7]
Blackberry Wreath Used on plates and bowls. Similar to Grape Wreath and Strawberry Wreath also made by Millersburg. [8]
Boutonniere A six petal flower surrounded by striped rays. Used on compotes in green, vaseline, amethyst, and marigold colors. [9]
Bullseye and Loop Used on vases. The vases are swung and the pattern is deformed. [10]
Butterfly and Corn Outside pattern used on a vase. Colors include green, vaseline, amethyst, and marigold. [11]
Campbell and Beesley Letters in the middle spelling out Campbell and Beesley. Found mostly on hand grip plates. [12]
Cherries Also called Hanging Cherries because the cherries hang into the center of the plate or bowl. [4]
Cosmos Only used on bowls in the color green. [13]
Country Kitchen A geometric pattern with a ring of stars on the outer edge. The pattern was used on bowls and table items like butter dishes and creamers. [14]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h Ellen Schroy (22 December 2007). Warman's Carnival Glass: Identification and Price Guide. Krause Publications. p. 11. ISBN 0896895696. Retrieved 1 September 2015.
  2. ^ a b William Heacock (1978). Fenton Glass the first twenty five years. O-Val Advertising. ISBN 0317038591.
  3. ^ a b c d e f "A Brief History of Carnival Glass". The Field Guide To Carnival Glass. Retrieved 1 September 2015.
  4. ^ a b David Doty. "Hanging Cherries, Millersburg". The Field Guide To Carnival Glass. Retrieved 3 September 2015.
  5. ^ David Doty. "Acorn, Millersburg". The Field Guide To Carnival Glass. Retrieved 3 September 2015.
  6. ^ David Doty. "Big Fish, Millersburg". The Field Guide To Carnival Glass. Retrieved 3 September 2015.
  7. ^ David Doty. "Big Thistle, Millersburg". The Field Guide To Carnival Glass. Retrieved 3 September 2015.
  8. ^ David Doty. "Blackberry Wreath, Millersburg". The Field Guide To Carnival Glass. Retrieved 3 September 2015.
  9. ^ David Doty. "Boutonniere, Millersburg". The Field Guide To Carnival Glass. Retrieved 3 September 2015.
  10. ^ David Doty. "Bullseye and Loop, Millersburg". The Field Guide To Carnival Glass. Retrieved 3 September 2015.
  11. ^ David Doty. "Butterfly and Corn, Millersburg". The Field Guide To Carnival Glass. Retrieved 3 September 2015.
  12. ^ David Doty. "Campbell and Beesley, Millersburg". The Field Guide To Carnival Glass. Retrieved 3 September 2015.
  13. ^ David Doty. "Cosmos, Millersburg". The Field Guide To Carnival Glass. Retrieved 3 September 2015.
  14. ^ David Doty. "Country Kitchen, Millersburg". The Field Guide To Carnival Glass. Retrieved 3 September 2015.