Mills v. Board of Education of District of Columbia

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Mills vs. Board of Education of District of Columbia, 348 F.Supp. 866 (D.D.C. 1972), was a lawsuit filed against the District of Columbia in the United States District Court for the District of Columbia. The court ruled that students with disabilities must be given a public education even if the students are unable to pay for the cost of the education.[1] The case established that "all children are entitled to free public education and training appropriate to their learning capacities".[2] Peter D. Roos, a former staff attorney at Harvard University's Center for Law and Education, described Mills as a "leading case" in a series of lawsuits that attempted to provide access to education for children with disabilities.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Mills vs. Board of Education of District of Columbia, 348 F.Supp. 866, 877-78 (D.D.C. 1972).
  2. ^ Henry A. Beyer, A Free Appropriate Public Education, 5 W. New Eng. L. Rev. 363, 365 (1983).
  3. ^ Peter D. Roos, The Potential Impact of Rodriguez on Other School Reform Litigation, 38 Law & Contemp. Probs. 566, 572 (1974).