Mimi Walters

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Mimi Walters
Mimi Walters 2015.jpg
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from California's 45th district
Assumed office
January 3, 2015
Preceded by John B. T. Campbell III
Member of the California Senate
from the 37th district
33rd district (2008–2012)
In office
December 1, 2008 – January 3, 2015
Preceded by Dick Ackerman
Succeeded by John Moorlach
Member of the California State Assembly
from the 73rd district
In office
December 6, 2004 – November 30, 2008
Preceded by Patricia Bates
Succeeded by Diane Harkey
Personal details
Born Marian E. Krogius
(1962-05-14) May 14, 1962 (age 54)
Pasadena, California, U.S.
Political party Republican
Spouse(s) David Walters
Education University of California, Los Angeles (BA)
Website House website

Marian Krogius "Mimi" Walters (née Marian Elaine Krogius; born May 14, 1962) is an American politician who is the U.S. Representative for California's 45th congressional district. A Republican, she was a member of the California State Senate for the 37th District (2012–15) and the 33rd Senate District (2008-2012), and served in the California State Assembly (2004-2008). On November 4, 2014, Walters was elected to the United States House of Representatives from California’s 45th congressional district, formerly held by John Campbell.

Walters is in favor of repealing the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare). She opposes abortion. She opposes same-sex marriage and has voted in favor of provisions which would allow federal contractors to discriminate against people based on their sexual orientation. She opposes federal regulation of greenhouse gas emissions. She supports President Trump's executive order to suspend the U.S. Refugee Admissions Program (USRAP) and suspend the entry of foreign nationals from seven Muslim-majority countries. In July 2016, FiveThirtyEight placed Walters among the congressional members most supportive of then-candidate Trump, having endorsed him "wholeheartedly". When a recording surfaced of Trump having "an extremely lewd conversation about women" and describing actions that could be considered sexual assault, and with numerous Republicans rescinding their endorsements, Walters did not rescind her endorsement and declined media requests for comment. She has voted with his party in 98% of votes so far in the current session of Congress and voted in line with President Trump's position in 100% of the votes.[1][2] In the wake of protests following President Trump's inauguration, Walters has refused to schedule or attend any town hall meetings with her constituents.[3]

Early years and education[edit]

Marian Elaine Krogius was born on May 14, 1962, in Pasadena, California. Krogius earned a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science from the University of California, Los Angeles in 1984. Before her election to the California State Assembly, Walters was a stockbroker.[citation needed]

Political career[edit]

Walters was Councilwoman and Mayor of Laguna Niguel during 1996–2004, and helped defeat efforts to convert Marine Corps Air Station El Toro to a commercial airport. She was elected in 2004 to represent the 73rd Assembly District, which includes coastal Orange and San Diego county communities of Laguna Niguel, Laguna Hills, Oceanside, Dana Point, San Clemente, San Juan Capistrano, and Aliso Viejo.

Walters is the co-founder of the California Women’s Leadership Association (CWLA.) She currently serves on the Board of the Orange County Gang Reduction Intervention Program (G.R.I.P.). She has also served on the Boards of the National Association of Women Business Owners (NAWBO) the Laguna Niguel Republican Women Federated, the American Cancer Society, and the South Coast Medical Center Foundation.[citation needed]

2010 California State Treasurer election[edit]

In January 2010, Walters announced that she would run for California State Treasurer against Democratic incumbent Bill Lockyer. She became the Republican nominee for State Treasurer the following June.[citation needed]

Investigation by the Fair Political Practices Commission[edit]

In early 2012, the Fair Political Practice Commission opened an inquiry as to whether Walters violated conflict-of-interest laws when her office assisted constituents who were having problems receiving feedback from California prison officials regarding the status of a financial claim that Senator Walters husband ultimately had an economic interest in.[4]

The inquiry was disclosed in a written notice to Walters' attorney by Gary Winuk, chief of enforcement for the state Fair Political Practices Commission. He wrote that his office "will be pursuing an investigation regarding whether or not Sen. Walters violated the Political Reform Act's conflict-of-interest prohibitions."[4] The FPPC inquiry ultimately found there was no wrongdoing on the part of Senator Walters or her staff.[5]

2012 California State Senate race[edit]

On September 20, 2012, Democratic candidate Steven R. Young filed a petition of extraordinary writ[6] seeking declaratory relief to the California Secretary of State to exclude opponent Mimi Walters from the 2012 election ballot for failing to establish a clear residency status in the district she was running in. Under state law, state legislators are required to live in the districts they represent.[7][8]

Walters and her family have long been associated with Laguna Niguel, where she served on the City Council and was elected to two terms in the Assembly and one in the Senate. But last year, the new California Citizens Redistricting Commission re-drew the state’s legislative districts. To run in the newly drawn 37th Senate District, Walters says she moved to Irvine. Young and two registered Republicans who have joined in the suit say Walters’ move was pure fiction. According to the suit, Walters and her husband, David, have lived in a 14,000-square-foot mansion in Laguna Niguel since 1999. Then, this year, the suit says that Walters changed her voter registration to reflect that she’s living in a 570-square-foot apartment in Irvine with no dishwasher or washer/dryer hook ups.[9][10] A Sacramento County Superior Court judge denied Young's petition to have Walters' name removed from the ballot. According to the judge, "the court doesn't have jurisdiction to hear questions about the qualifications of members of the state Legislature." [11]

U.S. House of Representatives[edit]

2014 election[edit]

On July 2, 2013, Walters formally announced her candidacy for Congress, replacing Congressman John Campbell, who announced he would not be seeking another term.[12] She was endorsed by a number of Republican Congressmen from California, including Campbell, Kevin McCarthy, Darrell Issa, and Ed Royce.[13] Walters was placed in the National Republican Congressional Committee's (NRCC) "Contender" category of their "Young Guns" program.[14] In September 2014, the NRCC named Walters along with 13 other candidates to their "Vanguard" program.[15] In the nonpartisan blanket primary, she came in first place in a field of three candidates with 45% of the vote. In the general election, she defeated Democratic candidate Drew Leavens with 65% of the vote.[16]

Committee assignments[edit]

Political positions[edit]

President Trump[edit]

In July 2016, FiveThirtyEight placed Walters among the congressional members most supportive of then-candidate Trump, having endorsed him "wholeheartedly".[17][18] When a recording surfaced of Trump having "an extremely lewd conversation about women" and describing actions that could be considered sexual assault, and with numerous Republicans rescinding their endorsements, Walters did not rescind her endorsement and declined media requests for comment.[19][20]

Abortion[edit]

Walters opposes abortion.[21]

Environment[edit]

Walters opposes federal regulation of greenhouse gas emissions.[21]

The League of Conservation Voters has given Walters a lifetime score of 3%.[22]

Healthcare[edit]

She is in favor of repealing the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare).[21][23]

LGBT rights[edit]

She opposes same-sex marriage.[21] She has voted in favor of provisions which would allow federal contractors to discriminate against people based on their sexual orientation.[24]

Immigration[edit]

In 2015, Walters opposed then-candidate Trump's proposed ban on Muslims.[25] When Trump signed an executive order to suspend the U.S. Refugee Admissions Program (USRAP) and suspend the entry of foreign nationals from seven Muslim-majority countries, Walters expressed support for the executive order.[26]

Pensions[edit]

In an op-ed written by Senator Walters in October 2012, Walters questioned the wisdom of creating a state-run retirement pension plan for private-sector workers.[27] The bill, SB 1234, established the California Secure Choice Retirement Savings Program for private-sector workers that requires employers that may not offer retirement plans to participate in the program.[28]

Private property legislation[edit]

Since the US Supreme Court decision Kelo v. New London in June 2005, Walters has been at the forefront of amending California government acquisition and the regulation of private property laws. She introduced two bills, AB 590 and AB 1990, in the 2005–06 session on these topics. After both bills failed in committee by party line votes, Walters became a leading figure in the campaign for Proposition 90. She was named honorary chair of the Save Our Homes initiative campaign. Supporters of Proposition 90 referred to their effort as protecting property rights. The initiative received over one million signatures to qualify for the November 2006 ballot. Proposition 90 failed with 48% of the vote. In the 2007–08 session, Walters introduced ACA 2, a state Constitutional Amendment to change government acquisition and the regulation of private property by California local governments. Walters introduced a package of bills in February 2011 to address the California pension crisis, SB 520 through SB 528.

Personal life[edit]

She and her husband, David, live in Bear Brand Ranch in Laguna Niguel with their four children.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bycoffe, Aaron (2017-01-30). "Tracking Mimi Walters In The Age Of Trump". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved 2017-02-18. 
  2. ^ Willis, Derek. "Represent". ProPublica. Retrieved 2017-02-18. 
  3. ^ Shimura, Tomoya (2017-02-24). "'Paid' activism claim by Rep. Mimi Walters staffer upsets Irvine town hall gatherers". The Orange County Register. Retrieved 2017-02-24. 
  4. ^ a b Patrick McGreevy (2012-06-15). "Ethics panel investigates state Sen. Mimi Walters". Articles.latimes.com. Retrieved 2016-11-11. 
  5. ^ "State Sen. Walters cleared in conflict investigation". Ocregister.com. Retrieved 2016-11-11. 
  6. ^ "Young on Trials - Trial tips from "the last minute trial lawyer"" (PDF). Steveyoungforcalifornia.com. Retrieved 2016-11-11. 
  7. ^ "California Elections Code". Codes.lp.findlaw.com. Retrieved 2016-11-11. 
  8. ^ "CA Codes (elec:8040-8041)". Leginfo.ca.gov. Retrieved 2016-11-11. 
  9. ^ McGreevy, Patrick. "State Sen. Mimi Walters challenged by opponent over her residency". LATimes. 
  10. ^ Brian Joseph (September 20, 2012). "Democrat sues to keep Mimi Walters off the ballot". OC Register. Retrieved October 1, 2012. 
  11. ^ "Mimi Walters' name to remain on ballot". Ocregister.com. Retrieved 2016-11-11. 
  12. ^ Posted on (2013-07-02). "Mimi Walters Formally Enters Congressional Race in 45th District - Mimi Walters for U.S. Representative". Mimiwalters.com. Retrieved 2016-11-11. 
  13. ^ "Endorsements - Mimi Walters for U.S. Representative". Mimiwalters.com. 2014-06-20. Retrieved 2016-11-11. 
  14. ^ "17 Republican Candidates Announced as 'Contender' as Part of NRCC's 'Young Guns' Program - National Republican Congressional Committee". Nrcc.org. 2014-03-26. Retrieved 2016-11-11. 
  15. ^ "Young Guns Vanguard - NRCC Young Guns". gopyoungguns.com. Retrieved 2016-11-11. 
  16. ^ "恋愛運を上げて素敵な出会いを|好きな人が出来たら恋占い". Dl45th.com. Retrieved 2016-11-11. 
  17. ^ "The 7 Levels Of Trump Support In Congress". FiveThirtyEight. 2016-07-20. Retrieved 2017-02-13. 
  18. ^ Wire, Sarah D. "Endorsement tracker: Some California Republicans still not ready for Trump". Los Angeles Times. ISSN 0458-3035. Retrieved 2017-02-13. 
  19. ^ "Where do all 28 GOP women in Congress stand on Donald Trump?". Retrieved 2017-02-13. 
  20. ^ WILLIAMS, LAUREN. "Some California Republicans call for Trump to resign". The Orange County Register. Retrieved 2017-02-13. 
  21. ^ a b c d "The Voter's Self Defense System". Project Vote Smart. Retrieved 2017-02-13. 
  22. ^ "Check out Representative Mimi Walters's Environmental Voting Record". League of Conservation Voters Scorecard. Retrieved 2017-02-13. 
  23. ^ "The fight's on in 4 California districts where Republicans represent people who voted for Hillary". Retrieved 2017-02-13. 
  24. ^ "7 Republicans Flipped Their Vote on LGBT Amendment, Setting Them Up for Attack". Roll Call. 2016-05-19. Retrieved 2017-02-13. 
  25. ^ WISCKOL, MARTIN. "All four Orange County GOP House members condemn Donald Trump's proposed ban on Muslims". The Orange County Register. Retrieved 2017-02-13. 
  26. ^ "Screaming at Mimi; Protests at Rep. Walters Office on Extreme Vetting and Healthcare | The Liberal OC". www.theliberaloc.com. Retrieved 2017-02-13. 
  27. ^ Walters, Mimi. "State-Run Private Sector Retirement Plans Subsidized by Taxpayers Coming in 2013". District37.cssrc.us. Retrieved 2016-11-11. 
  28. ^ "Bill Text - SB-1234 Retirement savings plans". Leginfo.legislature.ca.gov. Retrieved 2016-11-11. 

External links[edit]

United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
John B. T. Campbell III
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from California's 45th congressional district

2015–present
Incumbent
United States order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by
Mark Walker
United States Representatives by seniority
373rd
Succeeded by
Bonnie Watson Coleman