Mimoschinia

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Mimoschinia
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Class: Insecta
Order: Lepidoptera
Family: Crambidae
Genus: Mimoschinia
Warren, 1892[1]
Species: M. rufofascialis
Binomial name
Mimoschinia rufofascialis
(Stephens, 1834)
Synonyms
  • Ennychia rufofascialis Stephens, 1834
  • Eustrotia rufofascialis decorata Druce, 1898
  • Emprepes rufofascialis novalis Grote, 1876
  • Emprepes rufofascialis nuchalis Grote, 1878
  • Anthophila perviana Walker, 1865
  • Pyralis gelidalis Walker, 1866
  • Thelcteria costaemaculalis Snellen, 1887

Mimoschinia is a genus of moths of the Crambidae family. It contains only one species, Mimoschinia rufofascialis, the rufous-banded pyralid moth or barberpole caterpillar, which is found in the Caribbean, from Alberta to British Columbia, south to Texas and California and in Mexico.

The wingspan is 14–18 mm.[2] The forewings are greenish or greyish buff with reddish-brown antemedial and pstmedial bands, as well as a reddish-brown triangular patch on the middle of the costa and a small apical patch. The hindwings are greyish-buff, but somewhat lighter at the median area. Adults have been recorded on wing from January to October, with most records from June to September.

The larvae feed on various Malvaceae species, including Malvastrum, Abutilon, Wissadula, Sida, Alcea and Malvella species. They feed on the seeds of their host plant.[3] The larvae have a white and wine-red body and a light yellow head.

Subspecies[edit]

  • Mimoschinia rufofascialis rufofascialis (Caribbean)
  • Mimoschinia rufofascialis decorata (Druce, 1898) (Arizona, Mexico)
  • Mimoschinia rufofascialis novalis (Grote, 1876) (from Alberta to British Columbia, south to Texas and California)
  • Mimoschinia rufofascialis nuchalis (Grote, 1878) (California)

References[edit]

  1. ^ "GlobIZ search". Global Information System on Pyraloidea. Retrieved 2011-10-11. 
  2. ^ mothphotographersgroup
  3. ^ University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum