Minab

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Minab

ميناب
City
Minab is located in Iran
Minab
Minab
Coordinates: 27°08′48″N 57°04′48″E / 27.14667°N 57.08000°E / 27.14667; 57.08000Coordinates: 27°08′48″N 57°04′48″E / 27.14667°N 57.08000°E / 27.14667; 57.08000
Country Iran
ProvinceHormozgan
CountyMinab
BakhshCentral
Population
 (2016 Census)
 • Total73,170 [1]
Time zoneUTC+3:30 (IRST)
 • Summer (DST)UTC+4:30 (IRDT)

Minab (Persian: ميناب‎, also Romanized as Mīnāb)[2] is a city and capital of Minab County, Hormozgan Province, Iran.

Minab is not far from Bandar Abbas. It is famous for fishing (especially shrimps) and for agriculture (especially date palms and mangoes). It lies on the main official road connecting Bandar Abbas, the Makran and the Baluchistan Province. The population are mainly Shi'a Muslims but a Sunni minority does exist, and the language they speak is Minabi (locally Minow), a dialect which is something between Bandari, Balochi and Persian. Once a week, a well known bazaar called "Panjshambe bazar" or in Minabi language "Peyshambe Bazar" (English: Thursday's Bazaar) attracts people from all over Hormozgan, and beyond.

In ancient times Minab had the name of Harmosia (or Harmozeia).

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ https://www.amar.org.ir/english
  2. ^ Minab can be found at GEOnet Names Server, at this link, by opening the Advanced Search box, entering "-3075046" in the "Unique Feature Id" form, and clicking on "Search Database".
  • Barbera, Gerardo.2011. "Minâbi notes". In: "The Persian language in history", ed. by M. Maggi and P. Orsatti, Wiesbaden: Reichert, pp. 269–289.
  • Barbera, Gerardo. 2006. "The Palm in Minâb". In "Proceedings of the 5th Conference of the Societas Iranologica Europaea", vol. II, "Classical and Contemporary Iranian Studies", ed. by A. Panaino and R. Zipoli, Milan: Mimesis, pp. 321–338/LI-LIV.
  • Mohebbi Bahmani, Hassan. 2006. "Barrasi va towsif‑e zabânšenâxti‑e guyeš‑e Minâbi", Tehrân.
  • Skjærvø, Prods Oktor. 1975. “Notes on the dialects of Minab and Hormoz”. In "Norwegian Journal of Linguistics", vol. 29, pp. 113–28.