Mine Hill Township, New Jersey

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"Mine Hill" redirects here. For the hill in Auburn, New Hampshire, see Mine Hill (New Hampshire).
Mine Hill Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Mine Hill
Mine Hill Township highlighted in Morris County. Inset map: Morris County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Mine Hill Township highlighted in Morris County. Inset map: Morris County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Mine Hill Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Mine Hill Township, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°52′41″N 74°36′03″W / 40.878175°N 74.60078°W / 40.878175; -74.60078Coordinates: 40°52′41″N 74°36′03″W / 40.878175°N 74.60078°W / 40.878175; -74.60078[1][2]
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Morris
Incorporated May 8, 1923
Government[7]
 • Type Faulkner Act (Mayor-Council)
 • Body Township Council
 • Mayor Sam Morris (R, term ends December 31, 2019)[3][4][3]
 • Administrator Al Thompson[5]
 • Clerk Amanda G. Macchia[6]
Area[1]
 • Total 3.031 sq mi (7.850 km2)
 • Land 2.941 sq mi (7.616 km2)
 • Water 0.090 sq mi (0.234 km2)  2.98%
Area rank 332nd of 566 in state
25th of 39 in county[1]
Elevation[8] 866 ft (264 m)
Population (2010 Census)[9][10][11]
 • Total 3,651
 • Estimate (2015)[12] 3,578
 • Rank 425th of 566 in state
35th of 39 in county[13]
 • Density 1,241.6/sq mi (479.4/km2)
 • Density rank 355th of 566 in state
23rd of 39 in county[13]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07803[14][15]
Area code(s) 973[16]
FIPS code 3402746860[1][17][18]
GNIS feature ID 0882202[19]
Website www.minehill.com

Mine Hill Township is a township in Morris County, New Jersey, United States. At the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 3,651,[9][10][11] reflecting a decline of 28 (-0.8%) from the 3,679 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 346 (+10.4%) from the 3,333 counted in the 1990 Census.[20] Mine Hill Township is a residential community located in the northwest corner of Morris County.

Mine Hill was incorporated as a township by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 2, 1923, from portions of Randolph Township, based on the results of a referendum held on May 8, 1923.[21]

Mining in Mine Hill dates back to the early 18th century, and the township had some of the richest sources of iron ore in the country. Mahlon Dickerson, who was New Jersey's 12th Governor, and his family owned the Dickerson Mine, which was the largest ore mine in the area, supplying much of the iron ore used during the American Revolutionary War. The last mine in the township closed in the late 1960s.[22] The area's iron mines provided the derivation of the township's name.[23]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 3.031 square miles (7.850 km2), including 2.941 square miles (7.616 km2) of land and 0.090 square miles (0.234 km2) of water (2.98%).[1][2]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1930 1,422
1940 1,541 8.4%
1950 1,951 26.6%
1960 3,362 72.3%
1970 3,557 5.8%
1980 3,325 −6.5%
1990 3,333 0.2%
2000 3,679 10.4%
2010 3,651 −0.8%
Est. 2015 3,578 [12][24] −2.0%
Population sources:
1930[25] 1930-1990[26]
2000[27][28] 2010[9][10][11]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 3,651 people, 1,329 households, and 976.8 families residing in the township. The population density was 1,241.6 per square mile (479.4/km2). There were 1,380 housing units at an average density of 469.3 per square mile (181.2/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 80.69% (2,946) White, 4.60% (168) Black or African American, 0.41% (15) Native American, 4.96% (181) Asian, 0.03% (1) Pacific Islander, 5.78% (211) from other races, and 3.53% (129) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 23.01% (840) of the population.[9]

There were 1,329 households, of which 31.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.7% were married couples living together, 9.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.5% were non-families. 20.3% of all households were made up of individuals, and 7.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.75 and the average family size was 3.16.[9]

In the township, 22.6% of the population were under the age of 18, 7.0% from 18 to 24, 27.6% from 25 to 44, 30.6% from 45 to 64, and 12.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40.3 years. For every 100 females there were 97.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.3 males.[9]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $91,667 (with a margin of error of +/- $17,591) and the median family income was $103,532 (+/- $8,317). Males had a median income of $61,875 (+/- $13,249) versus $42,201 (+/- $13,280) for females. The per capita income for the township was $36,706 (+/- $3,887). About 2.4% of families and 3.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 0.0% of those under age 18 and 5.2% of those age 65 or over.[29]

Census 2000[edit]

At the 2000 United States Census,[17] there were 3,679 people, 1,365 households and 1,041 families residing in the township. The population density was 1,228.6 per square mile (475.1/km²). There were 1,388 housing units at an average density of 463.5 per square mile (179.2/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 90.41% White, 3.42% African American, 0.11% Native American, 2.50% Asian, 0.08% Pacific Islander, 1.79% from other races, and 1.69% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 8.67% of the population.[27][28]

There were 1,365 households of which 33.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 61.2% were married couples living together, 10.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 23.7% were non-families. 19.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.70 and the average family size was 3.08.[27][28]

24.5% of the population were under the age of 18, 4.9% from 18 to 24, 34.3% from 25 to 44, 23.1% from 45 to 64, and 13.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 94.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.3 males.[27][28]

The median household income was $64,643 and the median family income was $67,467. Males had a median income of $47,813 versus $37,250 for females. The per capita income for the township was $27,119. About 4.7% of families and 5.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 8.7% of those under age 18 and 7.1% of those age 65 or over.[27][28]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Mine Hill Township is governed within the Faulkner Act system of New Jersey municipal government, formally known as the Optional Municipal Charter Law, under Mayor-Council (Plan E), enacted as of January 1, 1980, based on the recommendations of a Charter Study Commission.[30] The Mine Hill Township Council consists of five elected members, each chosen at-large by the voters of Mine Hill in partisan elections for a four-year term on a staggered basis as part of the November general election, with two or three seats coming up for election every other year, and the mayoral seat up at the same time that two council seats are up for vote. At the Council's organizational meeting each January, one member is elected to serve as Mayor for a twelve-month term and another is chosen to serve as Deputy Mayor.[7]

As of 2016, the Mayor of Mine Hill Township is Republican Sam Morris, whose term of office ends December 31, 2019.[3] Members of the Mine Hill Township Council are Council President David R. Bloom (R, 2017), Bret Coranato (R, 2019), Kristine A. Kanzenbach (R, 2017), Conrad L. Pepperman (R, 2017) and Fred F. Willis, Jr. (R, 2019).[31][32][33][34][35][36]

Dover serves as the lead agency operating a joint municipal court that also serves the neighboring municipalities of Mine Hill Township, Mount Arlington, Victory Gardens and Wharton.[37] Established in 2009, the joint municipal court was forecast to offer annual savings in excess of $250,000 over the 10-year life of the agreement.[38]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Mine Hill Township is located in the 7th Congressional District[39] and is part of New Jersey's 25th state legislative district.[10][40][41] Prior to the 2010 Census, Mine Hill Township had been part of the 11th Congressional District, a change made by the New Jersey Redistricting Commission that took effect in January 2013, based on the results of the November 2012 general elections.[42]

New Jersey's Seventh Congressional District is represented by Leonard Lance (R, Clinton Township).[43] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark, term ends 2021)[44] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus, 2019).[45][46]

For the 2016–2017 session (Senate, General Assembly), the 25th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Anthony Bucco (R, Boonton Town) and in the General Assembly by Tony Bucco (R, Boonton Township) and Michael Patrick Carroll (R, Morris Township).[47] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[48] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[49]

Morris County is governed by a seven-member Board of Chosen Freeholders, who are elected at-large to three-year terms on a staggered basis, with either two or three seats up for election each year as part of the November general election. The Freeholder Board sets policies for the operation of six super-departments, more than 30 divisions plus authorities, commissions, boards and study committees.[50] Actual day-to-day operation of departments is supervised by County Administrator, John Bonanni.[51] As of 2016, Morris County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Kathryn A. DeFillippo (Roxbury Township, term ends December 31, 2016),[52] Deputy Freeholder William "Hank" Lyon (Montville, 2017),[53] Douglas Cabana (Boonton Township, 2016),[54] John Cesaro (Parsippany-Troy Hills Township, 2018),[55] Thomas J. Mastrangelo (Montville, 2016)[56] Christine Myers (Mendham Township, 2018),[57] and Deborah Smith (Denville, 2018).[58][51][59] Constitutional officers are County Clerk Ann F. Grossi (Parsippany-Troy Hills Township, 2018),[60] Sheriff Edward V. Rochford (Morris Plains, 2016)[61] and Surrogate John Pecoraro (Mendham Borough, 2019).[51][62]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 2,197 registered voters in Mine Hill Township, of which 513 (23.4%) were registered as Democrats, 669 (30.5%) were registered as Republicans and 1,014 (46.2%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There was one voter registered to another party.[63]

In the 2012 presidential election, Republican Mitt Romney received 49.2% of the vote (802 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 49.0% (799 votes), and other candidates with 1.8% (29 votes), among the 1,638 ballots cast by the township's 2,337 registered voters (8 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 70.1%.[64][65] In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 50.8% of the vote (894 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 47.5% (835 votes) and other candidates with 1.1% (20 votes), among the 1,759 ballots cast by the township's 2,283 registered voters, for a turnout of 77.0%.[66] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 54.3% of the vote (910 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry with 44.8% (751 votes) and other candidates with 0.5% (11 votes), among the 1,675 ballots cast by the township's 2,270 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 73.8.[67]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 66.2% of the vote (702 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 31.8% (337 votes), and other candidates with 2.0% (21 votes), among the 1,080 ballots cast by the township's 2,331 registered voters (20 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 46.3%.[68][69] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 56.5% of the vote (660 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 30.9% (361 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 9.2% (108 votes) and other candidates with 1.4% (16 votes), among the 1,168 ballots cast by the township's 2,217 registered voters, yielding a 52.7% turnout.[70]

Education[edit]

The Mine Hill School District serves students in Kindergarten through sixth grade at Canfield Avenue School. As of the 2012-13 school year, the district's one school had an enrollment of 414 students and 30.5 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 13.57:1.[71]

During the 1991-92 school year, Canfield Avenue School was recognized with the National Blue Ribbon School Award from the United States Department of Education, the highest honor that an American school can achieve.[72]

For seventh through twelfth grades, public school students attend Dover Middle School (grades 7&8) and Dover High School (grades 9-12) in Dover as part of a sending/receiving relationship with the Dover School District.[73] The district also serves students from Victory Gardens, which has been fully consolidated into the Dover School District since 2010.[74][75] The high school was recognized with the National Blue Ribbon School Award in 2013.[76]

Library services[edit]

The Mine Hill Township Library is located at the Civic Center.[77] Residents may also use either the County College of Morris Library in Randolph or the Morris County Library in Morris Plains. Residents of Mine Hill cannot use any other local library in Morris County, because the township does not belong to the Morris County Library System.

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 20.65 miles (33.23 km) of roadways, of which 15.89 miles (25.57 km) were maintained by the municipality, 2.86 miles (4.60 km) by Morris County and 1.90 miles (3.06 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[78]

The township is accessible via Interstate 80, U.S. Route 46, and Route 10.[79]

Public transportation[edit]

New Jersey Transit provides Midtown Direct service at the Dover train station[80] on the Montclair-Boonton Line and the Morristown Line to Newark Broad Street Station, Secaucus Junction, New York Penn Station and Hoboken Terminal.[81][82]

NJ Transit offered local bus service on the MCM5 route,[83] which was eliminated in 2010 when subsidies to the local provider were eliminated as part of budget cuts.[84]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Mine Hill Township include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e 2010 Census Gazetteer Files: New Jersey County Subdivisions, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2015.
  2. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  3. ^ a b c Mayor & Administration, Mine Hill Township. Accessed July 24, 2016.
  4. ^ 2016 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed June 14, 2016.
  5. ^ Directory, Mine Hill Township. Accessed December 19, 2012.
  6. ^ Clerks Corner, Mine Hill Township. Accessed July 24, 2016.
  7. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 116.
  8. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Mine Hill, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 8, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Mine Hill township, Morris County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 19, 2012.
  10. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 12. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  11. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Mine Hill township, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed December 19, 2012.
  12. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2015 - 2015 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 22, 2016.
  13. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 19, 2012.
  14. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Mine Hill, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed December 19, 2012.
  15. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed October 21, 2013.
  16. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Mine Hill, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed October 21, 2013.
  17. ^ a b American FactFinder, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  18. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed October 29, 2012.
  19. ^ US Board on Geographic Names, United States Geological Survey. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  20. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed December 19, 2012.
  21. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 194. Accessed October 29, 2012.
  22. ^ Welcome to the Township of Mine Hill, Mine Hill Township. Accessed July 25, 2008.
  23. ^ Hutchinson, Viola L. The Origin of New Jersey Place Names, New Jersey Public Library Commission, May 1945. Accessed September 7, 2015.
  24. ^ Census Estimates for New Jersey April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2015, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 22, 2016.
  25. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States: 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 717. Accessed December 19, 2012.
  26. ^ Table 6. New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed June 28, 2015.
  27. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Mine Hill township, Morris County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 19, 2012.
  28. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Mine Hill township, Morris County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 19, 2012.
  29. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Mine Hill township, Morris County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 19, 2012.
  30. ^ "The Faulkner Act: New Jersey's Optional Municipal Charter Law", New Jersey State League of Municipalities, July 2007. Accessed October 21, 2013.
  31. ^ Township Council, Mine Hill Township. Accessed July 24, 2016.
  32. ^ 2016 Municipal Data Sheet, Mine Hill Township. Accessed July 24, 2016.
  33. ^ Morris County Manual 2016, Morris County, New Jersey Clerk. Accessed July 19, 2016.
  34. ^ Morris County Municipal Elected Officials For The Year 2016], Morris County, New Jersey Clerk, updated June 3, 2016. Accessed July 19, 2016.
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  36. ^ November 5, 2013 General Election Winners, Morris County, New Jersey Clerk. Accessed July 19, 2016.
  37. ^ Mayor and Board of Aldermen, Town of Dover Minutes of the Reorganization Meeting for January 1, 2015, Town of Dover. Accessed July 29, 2015.
  38. ^ Forrest, Cindy. "Victory Gardens Council judges proposal for joint municipal court", The Record (Bergen County), May 18, 2012. Accessed July 29, 2015. "With Dover as the lead agency, four other area towns - Rockaway Borough, Wharton, Mine Hill, and Mt. Arlington - entered into a landmark municipal court shared-services agreement in 2009 anticipating an estimated $2.65 million savings over the 10-year life of the contract."
  39. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  40. ^ 2016 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 61, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed July 20, 2016.
  41. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
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  43. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  44. ^ About Cory Booker, United States Senate. Accessed January 26, 2015. "He now owns a home and lives in Newark's Central Ward community."
  45. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate, January 26, 2015. "He currently lives in Paramus and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  46. ^ Senators of the 114th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed January 26, 2015. "Booker, Cory A. - (D - NJ) Class II; Menendez, Robert - (D - NJ) Class I"
  47. ^ Legislative Roster 2016-2017 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 17, 2016.
  48. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  49. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  50. ^ What is a Freeholder?, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed July 5, 2016.
  51. ^ a b c Morris County Manual 2016, Morris County Clerk. Accessed July 5, 2016.
  52. ^ Kathryn A. DeFillippo, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed July 5, 2016.
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  54. ^ Douglas R. Cabana, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed July 5, 2016.
  55. ^ John Cesaro, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed July 5, 2016.
  56. ^ Thomas J. Mastrangelo, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed July 5, 2016.
  57. ^ Christine Myers, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed July 5, 2016.
  58. ^ Deborah Smith, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed July 5, 2016.
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  61. ^ About Us: Sheriff Edward V. Rochford, Morris County Sheriff's Office. Accessed July 5, 2016.
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  63. ^ Voter Registration Summary - Morris, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed December 19, 2012.
  64. ^ "Presidential General Election Results - November 6, 2012 - Morris County" (PDF). New Jersey Department of Elections. March 15, 2013. Retrieved December 24, 2014. 
  65. ^ "Number of Registered Voters and Ballots Cast - November 6, 2012 - General Election Results - Morris County" (PDF). New Jersey Department of Elections. March 15, 2013. Retrieved December 24, 2014. 
  66. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Morris County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed December 19, 2012.
  67. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Morris County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed December 19, 2012.
  68. ^ "Governor - Morris County" (PDF). New Jersey Department of Elections. January 29, 2014. Retrieved December 24, 2014. 
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  71. ^ District information for Mine Hill Township School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed March 2, 2015.
  72. ^ Blue Ribbon Schools Program: Schools Recognized 1982-1983 through 1999-2002 (PDF), United States Department of Education. Accessed May 11, 2006.
  73. ^ Dover High School 2015 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed July 11, 2016. "Dover High School, located 40 miles from New York City, services approximately 900 high school students from the Town of Dover, the Borough of Victory Gardens, and the Township of Mine Hill."
  74. ^ Martin, Liz. "Voters have their say on the budgets", Neighbor News, April 28, 2010. Accessed July 11, 2016. "The school board goes from 11 members to 10 after this election as the temporary Board seat assigned to the Victory Gardens representative Danielle Press expired permanently on April 20. Now that Victory Gardens has merged with the Dover school district, there will no longer be a dedicated Victory Gardens seat on the Board. Any resident from either Dover or Victory Gardens will be eligible to run for any available Board seat."
  75. ^ 13 Non-Operating School Districts Eliminated, New Jersey Department of Education press release dated July 1, 2009. Accessed July 11, 2016.
  76. ^ 2013 National Blue Ribbon Schools; All Public and Private, United States Department of Education. Accessed March 2, 2015.
  77. ^ Library, Mine Hill Township. Accessed December 19, 2012.
  78. ^ Morris County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed July 18, 2014.
  79. ^ U.S. Route 46 Straight Line Diagram, New Jersey Department of Transportation. Accessed October 21, 2013.
  80. ^ Dover station, New Jersey Transit. Accessed October 21, 2013.
  81. ^ Montclair-Boonton Line, New Jersey Transit. Accessed October 21, 2013.
  82. ^ Morristown Line, New Jersey Transit. Accessed October 21, 2013.
  83. ^ MorrisCounty Bus / Rail Connections, New Jersey Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 22, 2009. Accessed December 19, 2012.
  84. ^ Private Carrier Bus Service Reductions, New Jersey Transit. Accessed July 30, 2015.
  85. ^ Assemblywoman BettyLou DeCroce (R), New Jersey Legislature. Accessed March 2, 2015.
  86. ^ Kaufman, Michael T. "Teacher, 28, Slain In Her Apartment On West 72d Street; Teacher, 28, Is Slain in Her Apartment Other Violence Recalled", The New York Times, January 5, 1973. Accessed March 2, 2015. "She had grown up in Mine Hill, N. J., where both her parents are employed by Bell Laboratories."

External links[edit]