Ministry of Advanced Education and Skills Development

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Ministry of Advanced Education and Skills Development
Ministère de l'Enseignement supérieur et de la Formation professionnelle  (French)
Ontario, Canada.svg
The province of Ontario in Canada
Purpose The Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities is responsible for the administration of laws relating to postsecondary education and skills training in Ontario.[1]
Headquarters Toronto[2]
Official language
English
Minister
The Honourable Deb Matthews[3]
Budget
Estimated C$ 6.2 Billion in 2008/09[4]
Website http://www.tcu.gov.on.ca

The Ministry of Advanced Education and Skills Development (formerly Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities) is the ministry of the government of Ontario responsible for administration of laws relating to postsecondary education and skills training. This ministry is one of two education ministries, the other being the Ministry of Education (responsible for primary and secondary schools across Ontario). The Ministry's offices are in downtown Toronto, Ontario. The current minister is Deb Matthews, succeeding Reza Moridi.

Governance[edit]

The Minister of Advanced Education and Skills Development is a member of the Executive Council of Ontario (or cabinet) reporting to the Premier and held accountable by the Legislative Assembly of Ontario. The deputy minister manages the operations of the ministry that includes five main divisions. As a whole, the ministry has responsibility for administration of laws relating to postsecondary education and skills training in Ontario. The divisions cover employment and training, postsecondary education, strategic policy and programs, corporate management and services, and French-language education and educational operations.[5] The divisions report to the deputy minister who then reports to the minister.[5] The Ministry of Advanced Education and Skills Development works with several external advisory bodies to assist the governance of the higher education system in Ontario.[6]

Reports[edit]

Rae Report, 2005[edit]

The Rae Report, officially titled Ontario: A Leader in Learning, called for deregulation of tuition fees, income-contingent loan repayments, and an increase in public funding.[7]

List of ministers[edit]

Minister of University Affairs[edit]

Minister of Colleges and Universities[edit]

Minister of Skills Development[edit]

A short lived ministry that was closely tied to Colleges and Universities.

Minister of Education and Training[edit]

From 1993 to 1999 the Ministry of Education took on the responsibility for Training, Colleges and Universities as the Ministry of Education and Training.

Minister of Training, Colleges and Universities[nb 1][edit]

Minister of Advanced Education and Skills Development[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ No ministers were named between 1993 and 1999.

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ Ministry of Training, Colleges, and Universities Ontario. Role of the ministry. Retrieved May 29, 2008, from
  2. ^ Government of Ontario. Contacts. Retrieved May 30, 2008, from
  3. ^ "Reza Moridi". Government of Ontario. 
  4. ^ Ministry of Finance Ontario (2008). Expenditure estimates. Retrieved May 29, 2008, from
  5. ^ a b Ministry of Training, Colleges, and Universities Ontario (2008, May 29). Organization chart. Retrieved May 30, 2008, from http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/general/tcu_chart.pdf
  6. ^ Ministry of Training, Colleges, and Universities Ontario (2007, March 16). Agencies, boards, and commissions. Retrieved May 30, 2008, from http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/general/abcs/
  7. ^ Rae Report