Ministry of Energy Infrastructures and Natural Resources (Armenia)

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Ministry of Energy Infrastructures and Natural Resources
Էներգետիկ ենթակառուցվածքների և բնական պաշարների նախարարություն
2015-energy 508345309.jpg
Agency overview
Formed1992 as Ministry of Energy and Fuel of the Republic of Armenia
JurisdictionGovernment of Armenia
HeadquartersYerevan
Minister responsible
  • Minister of Energy Infrastructures and Natural Resources
Websitewww.minenergy.am

The Ministry of Energy Infrastructures and Natural Resources of the Republic of Armenia (Armenian: ՀՀ Էներգետիկ ենթակառուցվածքների և բնական պաշարների նախարարություն) is the ministry responsible for the management of the energy systems, and control of the exploitation of natural resources in Armenia. It elaborates and implements the policies of the Republic of Armenia Government in the energy sector.[1][2]

Its history can be traced to the time that Armenia was still in the Soviet Union. Since that time, many ministers have changed, as well the official name of the ministry, while maintaining the word 'energy' in its name. As of 2016, it is one of the 18 ministries in Armenia, and plays an important role in regulating the laws and policies regarding the energy and natural resource spheres.

History[edit]

Building of Ministry of Energy Infrastructures and Natural Resources

The Armenian energy system has a 100-year history, during which time the ArmEnergo department played an important role. ArmEnergo was formed in November 1936 with the decision of the Soviet Union with the aim of managing and controlling the exploitation and development of electric stations and networks. The two hydropower plants of Yerevan, the Gyumri HPP, Dzora HPP and other technical services were part of ArmEnergo. Later on ArmEnergo became the official body eligible to control the whole energy system of Armenia.

After the collapse of the Soviet Union, Armenian economic reforms, and dawn of an energy crisis required new control mechanisms. In order to overcome this, in 1992 the Ministry of Energy and Fuel of the Republic of Armenia was created. The ministry was renamed as the Ministry of Energy of The Republic of Armenia on August 4, 1995 by a decision of the Armenian government. Once more, the ministry was renamed as Ministry of Energy and Natural Resources of The Republic of Armenia by a decree of the Armenian president on 18 April 2008, which was renamed as the Ministry of Energy Infrastructures and Natural Resources of The Republic of Armenia on September 30, 2016. Today, the main aim of the ministry is to develop and maintain the governance policy of the Republic of Armenia in the sphere of energy infrastructures and natural resources.[2]

Structure[edit]

Ashot Manukyan is the current Minister, and the Deputy Ministers are Areg Galstyan, Iosif Isayan, Hayk Harutyunyan, and Vardan Gevorgyan.[3][4]

The structure of the ministry is as follows:

  • The Minister
  • Deputy Ministers
  • Ministry staff
  • Staff of the Minister
  • State non-profit organizations
  • Companies governed by ministry
  • Public Agencies Operational in the System of Governance of the Ministry[4]
List of energy ministers[5]
Name Portrait Party Term of Office Prime Minister
(Cabinet)
Minister of Energy and Fuel
Sepuh Tashchean 1992 1993 Khosrov Harutyunyan
Mels Hakobyan Independent[6] 16 February 1993 30 April 1993 Hrant Bagratyan
Hrayr Hovhannisyan 3 May 1993 21 July 1993 Hrant Bagratyan
Miron Shishmanyan 21 July 1993 26 July 1995 Hrant Bagratyan
Minister of Energy
Gagik Martirosyan RPA[7] 26 July 1995 17 November 1998 Hrant Bagratyan,

Armen Sarkissian,

Robert Kocharyan,

Armen Darbinyan

Meruzhan Mikaelyan 17 November 1998 15 June 1999 Armen Darbinyan
Davit Zadoyan RPA[8](later PANM[9]) 15 June 1999 20 May 2000 Vazgen Sargsyan,

Aram Sargsyan

Karen Galustyan 20 May 2000 4 December 2001 Andranik Margaryan
Minister of Energy and Natural Resources
Armen Movsisyan RPA 4 December 2001 30 April 2014 Andranik Margaryan,

Serzh Sargsyan,

Tigran Sargsyan

Yervand Zakharyan Yervand Zakharyan.jpg RPA 30 April 2014 29 February 2016 Hovik Abrahamyan
Levon Yolyan Independent 29 February 2016 20 September 2016 Hovik Abrahamyan
Minister of Energy Infrastructures and Natural Resources
Ashot Manukyan Independent[10] 20 September 2016 12 May 2018 Karen Karapetyan,

Serzh Sargsyan

Artur Grigoryan Prosperous Armenia 12 May 2018 3 October 2018 Nikol Pashinyan
Garegin Baghramyan Independent 4 October 2018 23 January 2019 Nikol Pashinyan

Natural resources[edit]

The mining sector is a very important part or Armenia’s national economy. Ore concentrates and metals are the main goods exported from Armenia at about half of all exported goods. About 670 mines are officially registered, of which more than half (around 400 mines) are exploited.

The ministry reports that there is an abundance of iron, copper, molybdenum, lead, zinc, gold, silver, antimony, aluminum, and also other types of minerals and metals in the Republic of Armenia. Metal mineral mines include 7 copper-molybdenum mines, 4 copper mines, 14 gold and gold-polymetallic mines, 2 polymetallic mine, 2 iron ore mines, and 1 aluminum mine.

Also, as a result of volcanic processes, mountainous rocks were formed. Notable ones are light rocks (tufa, perlite, pumice-stone, zeolite, scoria). In addition, different types of basalts, granites, nephelite syenite, and marble make up a large percent of resources in Armenia.[11]

Energy sources[edit]

While being surrounded by countries that have significant hydrocarbon reserves, Armenia does not have enough fossil fuels and coal to be able to use them for producing energy. As such, Armenia is totally dependent on fuel that is imported from abroad as a fuel source for transportation, generating energy, and producing heat. Research shows that Armenia has some fossil fuel reserves which are mostly located near Gyumri and Spitak, but they are located so deep that it is not economically feasible to extract them.[12]

In the 1990s, during the energy crisis, Armenia succeeded in constructing a large energy system. However, compared with 1988, when the energy generated capacity was more than 3.5 gigawatts, in 2010 it was just 1.2 gigawatts, which can be explained by the Armenian Government's decision to close some of the thermal power plants and one of the 2 reactors of the Metsamor Nuclear Power Plant. As a result, Armenia started utilizing renewable energy sources.[13]

Energy security[edit]

The concept of Energy security of Armenia is aimed at ensuring the energy security of Armenia in conformity with the provisions of the National Security Strategy of Armenia. Energy security is a system of political, economic, legal, organizational, methodological, and other activities that provide affordable prices to meet the daily needs of high-quality and reliable power supply, as well as in emergency situations, and during war.

Armenia has adopted a sustainable development policy which implies the development of the energy sector as the most important area. This sector's aim is to ensure the kind of progress that will create preconditions for the harmonization and balance of environmental issues for sustainable development of the next generation, while reducing energy loss. Because of Armenia's limited hydrocarbon resources, energy security has become imperative for the presence of energy resources, including the balance of renewable energy sources (renewable energy), and the extensive use of full inclusion.

Since there are no fossil fuel resources in Armenia, the function of Ministry of Energy Infrastructures and Natural Resources of Armenia and natural in the framework of the energy security's concept is to increase energy efficiency in the economy, develop nuclear energy, and efficiently use renewable energy resources.

The adoption of the concept of energy security is due to:[14][15]

  1. The regional and the world's political and socio-economic rapid development, global economic crisis, as well as Armenia's energy independence, security of emergency, and war.
  2. Proper engagement of Armenia in regional programs that are implemented in the region by the European Union, Russia, the United States and other international organizations.
  3. The importance of creating a long-term strategic reserve of fuel and energy resources.

Strategic plans[edit]

Strategic plans of the ministry are based on a three-level diversification policy:

  1. Generation of energy (HPPs, NPPs, TPPs, and other power plants)
  2. Energy supply (fuel supply), such as natural gas, oil and other fuels
  3. Fuel and energy transportation: natural gas delivery by pipelines, oil product delivery and other related transportation

The three-level diversification policy's aim is to provide a sufficient level of energy security, to have electricity and gas consumption reserves in both emergency and force majeure situations. In the framework of this policy there are programs to neutralize internal and external threats, for life-time extension of the Armenian Nuclear Power Plant, and for construction of new cost-effective electricity generating facilities.[16][17]

Achievements of the ministry[edit]

Construction of new generating capacities[edit]

Regional integration[edit]

  • Armenia and Georgia signed the Parallel Operation Agreement, in which Armenia and Georgia agree to provide power to each other during emergency situations.
  • Armenia and Georgia accepted the investigation of interconnection transmission lines with establishment of a substation with a back-to-back converter at an overall power of 1,050 MW, and marked Amendment N2 to the New Transmission Line Construction Agreement on April 16, 2014.[16]

Investment Projects[edit]

The Ministry of Energy Infrastructures and Natural Resources of Armenia has continuous goals to contribute to the development of the energy sector in the Republic of Armenia. Thus, every year, it starts to accomplish new projects in the field of renewable energy in conjunction with various international companies and investors.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Government - Structure - The Government of the Republic of Armenia". Retrieved 27 December 2015.
  2. ^ a b "Historical overview - Ministry - www.minenergy.am". Retrieved 27 December 2015.
  3. ^ "Minister - Ministry - www.minenergy.am". www.minenergy.am. Ministry of Energy Infrastructures and Natural Resources of The Republic of Armenia. Retrieved 11 December 2016.
  4. ^ a b "Structure - Ministry - www.minenergy.am". www.minenergy.am. Ministry of Energy Infrastructures and Natural Resources of The Republic of Armenia. Retrieved 11 December 2016.
  5. ^ "Government - Structure - The Government of the Republic of Armenia". www.gov.am. The Government of the Republic of Armenia. Retrieved 11 December 2016.
  6. ^ "National Assembly of RA: Mels Hakopian". Retrieved 2017-03-03.
  7. ^ "ՀՀԱ Կառավարություն. Աշխատակազմի կառուցվածք". Retrieved 2017-03-03.
  8. ^ "168 ժամի հարցազրույց. Դավիթ Զադոյան՝ "Բագրատյանն իրոք արդեն պատրաստ է նախագահ դառնալու". մամուլ". 2013-01-29. Retrieved 2017-03-03.
  9. ^ "National Assembly of RA: David Zadoyan". Retrieved 2017-03-03.
  10. ^ "Team members: Ashot Manukyan". Retrieved 2017-03-03.
  11. ^ "General Information - Mining Resources - www.minenergy.am". www.minenergy.am. Ministry of Energy Infrastructures and Natural Resources of The Republic of Armenia. Retrieved 11 December 2016.
  12. ^ "Energy Overview of Armenia". www.geni.org.
  13. ^ Gharabegian, Areg (3 July 2013). "Armenia Prepares Renewable Roadmap Amid Energy Crisis". www.renewableenergyworld.com. RenewableEnergyWorld.com. Retrieved 11 December 2016.
  14. ^ "Հայեցակարգեր - Ծրագրեր - www.minenergy.am". www.minenergy.am (in Armenian). Ministry of Energy Infrastructures and Natural Resources of The Republic of Armenia. Retrieved 2016-12-11.
  15. ^ (August 2005). Energy Sector Development Strategies in the Context of Economic Development in Armenia [PDF]. www.nature-ic.am. Information Center of the Ministry of Nature Protection. Retrieved 11 December 2016.
  16. ^ a b Galstyan, Areg (2014). Energy Strategy of Armenia Accomplishments, Challenges, Next Steps [PDF]. www.minenergy.am. Ministry of Energy Infrastructures and Natural Resources of The Republic of Armenia. Retrieved 11 December 2016.
  17. ^ Hovhannisyan, Karen (2003). [1]Sustainable Development and Energy Security in Armenia: a Step Towards Dilemma [PDF]. www.lumes.lu.se. Lund University. Retrieved 11 December 2016.

External links[edit]