Minto Group

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The Minto Group
Private Company
Industry Real estate
Founded 1955
Headquarters Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Key people
Michael Waters (CEO)
Roger Greenberg (Executive Chairman)
Owner The Greenberg Family
Number of employees
1,200 (2017)
Website https://www.minto.com/
The Minto Metropole, built by Minto

The Minto Group is a Canadian real estate company, based in Ottawa, Ontario. It builds homes in Ottawa, Toronto, Calgary, and Florida. It also manages multi-residential and commercial properties in Ontario and Alberta. It has built 80,000 new homes[1], and manages $2.9 billion in assets, including 13,000 multi-residential units and 2.7 million square feet of commercial space.[2] The firm is one of Ottawa's largest residential landlords.[3]

History[edit]

Minto was founded in 1955 by Gilbert, Irving, Lorry and Louis Greenberg, as a home builder.[4] It was originally called Mercury Homes, but renamed itself Minto Construction Company in 1957. Its first large development was Parkwood Hills in Nepean in partnership with Westmore Investements.[5] As part of that development, Minto built Canada's first high rise condominium, Horizon House on Meadowlands Drive.[1] The firm developed a number of other subdivisions in the Ottawa area in the 1960s and 1970s; in 1971, three quarters of construction in Nepean was by Minto.[5]

In the early 1980s, the firm expanded to Florida.[6]

In 1991, Roger Greenberg, son of Gilbert, became CEO, after the death of his uncle Irving.[6]

In 2012, Michael Waters, who is not part of the Greenberg family, became CEO.[6]

In May 2018, Minto announced it would hold an IPO for its Canadian multi-residential properties.[7] The properties would become part of a new entity, Minto Apartment Real Estate Investment Trust, which Minto Group would continue to have a significant ownership stake in. The trust would initially own 4279 rental suites, 72% of which would be in Ottawa, with the intention of eventually holding all of Minto's 13,000 multi-residential units. Minto Group is holding the IPO in part to provide money to Minto's owners, the Greenberg family. Minto plans to raise $200 million in the IPO, which will take place on the Toronto Stock Exchange..[8]

Business[edit]

The Minto Group is divided into three divisions:

  • Minto Properties manages multi-residential and commercial properties, some of which have been built by Minto.
  • Minto Communities Canada is a home builder in Ottawa, Toronto, and Calgary. It has built 60,000 homes over its history. It builds both low-rise and high-rise housing, and in recent years has been building more luxury rental projects.[9] In 2015, Minto was the largest home builder in Ottawa, with 913 homes built, and 24 percent of the market.[10]
  • Minto Communities USA is a Florida home builder. It has built 25,000 homes over its history.[11] It was ranked as the 56th largest home builder in the United States in 2016.[11]

The Greenberg family, who founded and still control the Minto Group[6], were listed as the 74th richest people in Canada in 2017, according to Canadian Business.[4]

Minto has been involved in a number of controversial developments, including Minto Mahogany in Manotick,[12] the Minto Midtown in Davisville,[13] Potter’s Key in Stittsville,[14] and Minto West in Palm Beach.[15]

Minto has also been involved in a number of controversies in its role as a landlord. There have been complaints about the company's proposed rent increases.[16] Minto's 2017 decision to charge for visitor parking in its Ottawa buildings also angered some tenants.[17]

Notable Developments[edit]

Neighborhoods:[edit]

Buildings:[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Willing, Jon (2017-08-20). "The Capital Builders: How the Greenbergs mix business, philanthropy and sports". Ottawa Citizen. Retrieved 2018-01-05. 
  2. ^ "About The Minto Group - Our Organization and Capabilities | Minto". www.minto.com. Retrieved 2018-01-05. 
  3. ^ "Minto paid $94.55M for Craig Henry community: records | Ottawa Business Journal". www.obj.ca. Retrieved 2018-03-09. 
  4. ^ a b "Canada's Richest People: The Greenberg Family". Canadian Business - Your Source For Business News. 2015-12-24. Retrieved 2018-01-05. 
  5. ^ a b c d e Elliott, Bruce (1990). The City Beyond: A History of Nepean, Birthplace of Canada's Capital 1792-1990. the City of Nepean. pp. 277–279. ISBN 1-55036-258-5. 
  6. ^ a b c d Bagnall, James (2013-10-09). "Minto No Longer All in the Family". The Ottawa Citizen. 
  7. ^ "Ottawa real estate giant Minto files for initial public offering estimated at $200 million on TSX". Ottawa Citizen. 2018-05-24. Retrieved 2018-05-28. 
  8. ^ "Canada's Minto Is Said Seek $156 Million in Real Estate IPO". Bloomberg Quint. 2018-05-10. Retrieved 2018-05-18. 
  9. ^ Lorinc, John (2016-12-08). "Builders flock to high-end rental development". The Globe and Mail. Retrieved 2018-01-05. 
  10. ^ a b c d e Langston, Patrick (2015-06-05). "Minto Communities marks 60th anniversary". Ottawa Citizen. Retrieved 2018-01-05. 
  11. ^ a b Goodman, Jennifer (2016-05-25). "Minto announces three new large-scale communities". BuilderOnline.com. Retrieved 2018-01-05. 
  12. ^ "Controversial Manotick development gains provincial approval". CTV News Ottawa. 2009-04-10. Retrieved 2018-03-09. 
  13. ^ a b "Residential skyscraper rising in shadow of controversy". The Globe and Mail. 2003-10-03. Retrieved 2018-03-09. 
  14. ^ "Ottawa committee to vote on controversial Stittsville subdivision plan | Ottawa Business Journal". www.obj.ca. Retrieved 2018-03-09. 
  15. ^ "Palm Beach County board endorses Minto West plan in 5-2 vote". mypalmbeachpost. 2014-08-27. Retrieved 2018-03-09. 
  16. ^ "Minto tenants say rent hike 'not justified'". The Ottawa Citizen. 2002-01-30. 
  17. ^ "'Absolutely ludicrous': Minto tenants upset visitors will have to pay for parking". Ottawa Citizen. 2017-09-30. Retrieved 2018-03-09. 
  18. ^ "Ottawa - High-Rise Buildings (all)". Emporis.com. Retrieved 26 August 2009. 
  19. ^ Moore, Aaron A. (2013). Planning politics in Toronto : the Ontario Municipal Board and urban development. Toronto: University of Toronto Press. p. 1999–. ISBN 978-1-4426-4423-6. Retrieved 18 May 2017. 

External Links[edit]