Miracles of Muhammad

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Muhammad
Muhammad

Miracles of the Islamic Prophet Muhammad are a number of supernatural occurrences, which according to Islamic tradition were made by Muhammad during his lifetime. These miracles are shown either in the Qur'an or, in the vast majority of cases, in the hadith (traditions of Muhammad). Muhammad's miracles encompass a broad range, such as the multiplication of food, manifestation of water, hidden knowledge, prophesies, healing, punishment, and power over nature.[1]

According to historian Denis Gril, the Qur'an does not overtly describe Muhammad performing miracles, and the supreme miracle of Muhammad is finally identified with the Qur'an itself.[2] However, several miracles are reported in the Quran and miracles "appear early and often in the hadith"[3] and the hadiths are indispensable in elucidating Muhammad's miracles.[4]

List of miracles[edit]

Quran - The revelation of the Quran is considered by Muslims to be Muhammad's greatest miracle[5][6][7] and a miracle for all times, unlike the miracles of other prophets, which were confined to being witnessed in their own lifetimes.[8]

  • Splitting of the moon
  • Isra and Mi'raj (Night Journey)
  • According to Ali ibn Sahl Rabban al-Tabari, Muhammad's success and victory against his enemies was one of his miracles.[9] Similarly, many modern Muslim historians believe Muhammad's greatest miracles were his worldly accomplishments, in a short time span, in various fields (such as the religious, social, proselytising, political, military and literary spheres) and "the transformation of the Arabs from marauding bands of nomads into world conquerors."[10][11]
  • On several occasions he provided food and water supernaturally.[12]
  • He comforted a palm tree that was crying and upset after he stopped leaning on it during his sermons.[12]
  • He caused two trees to move at his command.[12]
  • Prophecies made by him.
  • His migration from Mecca to Medina.[13]
  • He quenched the thirst of thousands of his soldiers during the Battle of Tabouk and enabled them to use water for ablution after causing water to pour forth.[14]
  • He caused a well to swell with water during the event of the Treaty of Hudaybiyyah, enabling his followers with him to drink and use the water for ablution.[14]
  • He threw a handful of dust at some of the enemy during the Battle of Badr, causing them to be blinded. This miracle is mentioned in the Quran, Sura Al-Anfal, Verse 17 (8:17).[14]
  • When the Jews of Medina claimed that the hereafter belonged to them alone, a Quranic verse was revealed (2:94) saying "Then wish for death. if you are speaking the truth." Muhammad predicted they would not be able to wish for death and his statement was proven correct, despite the Jews eagerness to disprove the reality of his Prophethood. This challenge was repeated in another Quranic verse (62:6-7) and again was never met by the Jews.[14][15]
  • He told his companion, Uthman, that a calamity would befall him, which would be followed with his entering paradise; this eventuated during Uthman's Caliphate.[14]
  • He told his companion, Ammar ibn Yasir, that the unjust party would kill him; this eventuated during the First Fitna.[14]
  • He said that God would make peace between two large Muslim groups through his grandson Hasan ibn Ali; this eventuated with the Hasan–Muawiya treaty.[14]
  • He said that a man who was apparently fighting for the Muslim cause would actually be of the people of Hell; this was proven when the man committed suicide in order to remove his suffering following a wound in battle.[14]
  • He said that he would kill one of the enemies of the Muslims, Ubay ibn Khalaf, which he achieved at the Battle of Uhud.[16]
  • Before the Battle of Badr, he showed exactly where each of the enemy chiefs would be killed; they all died in the exact locations stated.[16]
  • He said that a part of his nation would raid by sea; this eventuated with the establishment of Muslim naval power under the Caliphate.[16]
  • He said that his daughter Fatimah would be the first of his family to die after him; which eventuated.[16]
  • He told his wives that the most charitable one among them would be the first to die after him; this eventuated with the death of Zaynab bint Jahsh.[16]
  • He caused Abdullah ibn Masud to convert to Islam after he made a barren ewe, which produced no milk, to produce milk.[16]
  • He spit into Ali's sick eye, during the Battle of Khaybar, and it became healthy.[1]
  • His companions would hear the food before him praising God.[1]
  • He caused it to rain during a drought in Medina.[17]
  • His prayers were instantly answered. Anas reported in Sahih Muslim in ''The Book of the Merits of the Companions'':

''My mother Umm Anas came to Allah's Messenger -Peace be upon him- and she prepared my lower garment out of the half of her headdress and (with the other half) she covered my upper body and said: Allah's Messenger, here is my son Unais; I have brought him to you for serving you. Invoke blessings of Allah upon him. Thereupon he (the Holy Prophet) said: O Allah, make an increase in his wealth, and progeny. Anas said: By Allah, my fortune is huge and my children, and grand-children are now more than one hundred.''[18]

  • Stones and trees used to greet him before and during his prophethood.[19][20]
  • A Camel wept tenderly while procuding yearning sound when he saw Muhammad, when Muhammad came to it and wiped the temple of its head. It kept silence. Then he asked for the master of this camel and a a young man from the Ansar (Islam) came and said “This is mine, Apostle of Allah -Peace be upon him-.” He said “Don’t you fear Allah about this beast which Allah has given in your possession. It has complained to me that you keep it hungry and load it heavily which fatigues it.”[21]
  • He had the The Seal of Prophethood (Khatam an-Nabiyyin) between his shoulders, specifically on the end of his left shoulder blade, It is depicted as a mole, in size compared to the egg of a Partidge or to a pigeon's egg and its color was the same as that of Muhammad's body.[22][23][24][25][25][26] It is believed that each Prophet sent by God had this Seal on a certain part of his body.[27]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Kenneth L. Woodward (10 Jul 2001). The Book of Miracles: The Meaning of the Miracle Stories in Christianity, Judaism, Buddhism, Hinduism and Islam (reprint ed.). Simon & Schuster. p. 189. ISBN 9780743200295. 
  2. ^ Denis Gril, Miracles, Encyclopedia of the Qur'an
  3. ^ F. E. Peters (13 Oct 2010). Jesus and Muhammad: Parallel Tracks, Parallel Lives. Oxford University Press. p. 205. ISBN 9780199780044. 
  4. ^ Kenneth L. Woodward (10 Jul 2001). The Book of Miracles: The Meaning of the Miracle Stories in Christianity, Judaism, Buddhism, Hinduism and Islam (reprint ed.). Simon & Schuster. p. 183. ISBN 9780743200295. 
  5. ^ Ibrāhīm, Zaynab; Aydelott, Sabiha T.; Kassabgy, Nagwa, eds. (1 Jan 2000). Diversity in Language: Contrastive Studies in Arabic and English Theoretical and Applied Linguistics (illustrated ed.). American Univ in Cairo Press. p. 31. ISBN 9789774245787. 
  6. ^ David Whitten Smith; Elizabeth Geraldine Burr (21 Aug 2014). Understanding World Religions: A Road Map for Justice and Peace (2 ed.). Rowman & Littlefield. p. 142. ISBN 9781442226449. 
  7. ^ Brown, Brian Arthur, ed. (1 Jan 2014). Three Testaments: Torah, Gospel, and Quran (illustrated, reprint ed.). Rowman & Littlefield. p. 403. ISBN 9781442214934. 
  8. ^ Edward Sell (5 Nov 2013). The Faith of Islam. Routledge. p. 218. ISBN 9781136391699. 
  9. ^ Laurence Edward Browne (1933). The Eclipse of Christianity in Asia: From the Time of Muhammad Till the Fourteenth Century. Cambridge University Press Archive. p. 90. 
  10. ^ Daniel W. Brown (4 Mar 1999). Rethinking Tradition in Modern Islamic Thought (reprint, revised ed.). Cambridge University Press. p. 65. ISBN 9780521653947. 
  11. ^ Patricia Blundell; Trevor Jordan (7 Mar 2012). Exploring Religion and Ethics: Religion and Ethics for Senior Secondary Students. Cambridge University Press. pp. 129–30. ISBN 9780521187169. 
  12. ^ a b c Leaman, Oliver, ed. (2006). The Qur'an: An Encyclopedia (illustrated, reprint, annotated ed.). Taylor & Francis. p. 423. ISBN 9780415326391. 
  13. ^ F. E. Peters (13 Oct 2010). Jesus and Muhammad: Parallel Tracks, Parallel Lives. Oxford University Press. p. 153. ISBN 9780199781379. 
  14. ^ a b c d e f g h Kenneth L. Woodward (10 Jul 2001). The Book of Miracles: The Meaning of the Miracle Stories in Christianity, Judaism, Buddhism, Hinduism and Islam (reprint ed.). Simon & Schuster. p. 186. ISBN 9780743200295. 
  15. ^ Sarah Stroumsa (1 Jan 1999). Freethinkers of Medieval Islam: Ibn Al-Rawāndī, Abū Bakr Al-Rāzī and Their Impact on Islamic Thought. BRILL. pp. 51–2, 57. ISBN 9789004113749. 
  16. ^ a b c d e f Kenneth L. Woodward (10 Jul 2001). The Book of Miracles: The Meaning of the Miracle Stories in Christianity, Judaism, Buddhism, Hinduism and Islam (reprint ed.). Simon & Schuster. p. 188. ISBN 9780743200295. 
  17. ^ Kenneth L. Woodward (10 Jul 2001). The Book of Miracles: The Meaning of the Miracle Stories in Christianity, Judaism, Buddhism, Hinduism and Islam (reprint ed.). Simon & Schuster. pp. 197–8. ISBN 9780743200295. 
  18. ^ ibn al-Hajjaj, Muslim (17/03/2017). "44 The Book of the Merits of the Companions (32) Chapter: The Virtues Of Anas bin Malik (RA)". www.sunnah.com.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  19. ^ Ibn al-Hajjaj, Muslim (17/03/2017). "43 The Book of Virtues (1) Chapter: The Superiority Of The Prophet's Lineage, And The Stone That Greeted Him Before His Prophethood.". www.sunnah.com.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  20. ^ Al-Tirmidhi, Abu Isa (17/03/2017). "49 Chapters on Virtues, hadith n°3626". www.sunnah.com.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  21. ^ Abu Dawood, Sulaymān (17/03/2017). "15 Jihad (Kitab Al-Jihad) (894) Chapter: What Has Been Commanded Regarding Proper Care For Riding Beasts And Cattle.". www.sunnah.com.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  22. ^ Al-Bukhari, Muhammad (17/03/2017). "4 Ablutions (Wudu'), (40)Chapter: The using of the remaining water after ablution.". www.sunnah.com.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  23. ^ Al-Bukhari, Muhammad (17/03/2017). "75 Patients (18) Chapter: Whoever took the sick boy (to someone) to invoke Allah for him.". www.sunnah.com.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  24. ^ Al-Bukhari, Muhammad (17/03/2017). "43 The Book of Virtues (30) Chapter: The Seal Of Prophethood, Its Attributes And Its Location On The Body Of The Prophet.". www.sunnah.com.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  25. ^ a b Al-Tirmidhi, Abu-Isa (17/03/2017). "Seal Of Nubuwwah (Prophethood)". www.sunnah.com.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  26. ^ Ibn al-Hajjaj, Muslim (17/03/2017). "43 The Book of Virtues (29) Chapter: His Grey Hairs". www.sunnah.com.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  27. ^ al-Suyūṭī, Abū al-Faḍl. Al-Khasais-ul-Kubra. pp. 1/103. 

Further reading[edit]