This is a good article. Click here for more information.

Miri, Malaysia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Miri)
Jump to: navigation, search
This article is about a city in Sarawak, Malaysia. For the administrative district, see Miri District. For the administrative division, see Miri Division. For the Star Trek episode, see Miri (Star Trek: The Original Series).
Miri
Other transcription(s)
 • Jawi ميري
 • Chinese 美里
From left to right: Marina Bay boats and sunset, Miri city centre from Canada Hill
From left to right: Marina Bay boats and sunset, Miri city centre from Canada Hill
Official seal of Miri
Miri City Council
Nickname(s): "Resort City", "Oil Town"
Motto: Progress with the society
(Malay: Maju bersama masyarakat)
Miri is located in East Malaysia
Miri
Miri
Location in Borneo
Miri is located in Malaysia
Miri
Miri
Location in Malaysia
Coordinates: 4°24′10″N 113°59′36″E / 4.40278°N 113.99333°E / 4.40278; 113.99333Coordinates: 4°24′10″N 113°59′36″E / 4.40278°N 113.99333°E / 4.40278; 113.99333
Country  Malaysia
State  Sarawak
Division Miri Division
District Miri District
Founded by Royal Dutch Shell 10 August 1910
Municipality 6 November 1981
Granted city status 20 May 2005
Government[1]
 • Type Miri City Council
 • Mayor Lawrence Lai Yew Son
Area[2]
 • Miri City 997.43 km2 (385.11 sq mi)
Elevation[3] 17 m (56 ft)
Lowest elevation 0 m (0 ft)
Population (2010)[4]
 • Miri City 234,541
 • Density 235.15/km2 (609.0/sq mi)
 • Demonym Mirian
Time zone MST (UTC+8)
 • Summer (DST) Not observed (UTC+8)
Postal code 98xxx
International dialling code prefix +6085 (landline only)
Vehicle registration plate prefix QM (for all vehicles except taxis)
HQ (for taxis only)
Website www.miricouncil.gov.my

Miri /ˈmɪr/ (Jawi: ميري‎; Chinese: 美里; pinyin: Méi lǐ) is a coastal city in northeastern Sarawak, Malaysia, located near the border of Brunei, on the island of Borneo. The city covers an area of 997.43 square kilometres (385.11 sq mi),[2] located 798 kilometres (496 mi) northeast of Kuching[5] and 329 kilometres (204 mi) southwest of Kota Kinabalu.[6] Miri is the second largest city in Sarawak,[7] with a population of 234,541.[4] The city is also the capital of Miri District of the Miri Division.

Before Miri was founded, Marudi was the administrative centre of the northern region of Sarawak. Miri was founded in 1910 when the first oil well was drilled by Royal Dutch Shell. The discovery of an oil field in Miri has led to rapid development of Miri town. Miri became the administrative centre of the northern region of Sarawak by 1929. During World War II, the Miri oil fields were destroyed by the Brooke government to sabotage Japanese operations in Southeast Asia but to no avail; Miri town was the first landing point of Japanese troops in Borneo. The subsequent Japanese occupation led Miri to become a target of Allied air raids which caused the destruction of oil refinery facilities in Miri. The petroleum industry continued to be a major player in the city's economy after the war. Oil exploration has moved offshore since the 1950s, but subsequently new inland oil fields were found in 1989 and 2011. In 1974, the formation of Malaysian oil and gas company Petronas led to co-operation between Petronas and Shell on oil exploration in the Miri region. In 2005, Miri became the 10th city to be granted official city status in Malaysia.

Miri is the main tourist gateway to Gunung Mulu National Park, Loagan Bunut National Park, Lambir Hills National Park, Niah National Park and Miri-Sibuti Coral Reef National Park.[8][9] The Gunung Mulu National Park with its Sarawak Chamber is one of the favourite ecotourism destinations.[7] Miri is also the birthplace of the Malaysian petroleum industry. Other major industries in the city include timber, oil palm and tourism.

Etymology[edit]

Miri town is named after a minority ethnic group called "Jatti Meirek"[10] or simply "Mirek",[11] or "Miriek". This ethnic group is the earliest settlers in the region of Miri Division.[10] Europeans who later came here for oil exploration mistakenly pronounced "Miriek" as "Miri" and hence the name continue to be used today.[12]

Prehistory[edit]

Main article: Prehistoric Malaysia

The first foragers visited the West Mouth of Niah Cave (located 110 km southwest of Miri city)[13] 50,000 years ago when Borneo was connected to the mainland of Southeast Asia. The landscape of Niah Cave was drier and more open than it is now. Prehistoric Niah Cave was surrounded by a mosaic of closed forests with bush, parkland, swamps, and rivers. The foragers were able to survive in the rainforests through hunting, fishing, mollusc collection, and plant gathering.[14] The earliest evidence of human population in the area dates back to 40,000 BC in Niah Cave at Paleolithic period. This is evidenced by the discovery of a Homo sapiens skull nicknamed "Deep Skull" in a deep trench uncovered by Tom Harrisson in 1958,[13][15] which is the oldest modern human skull in Southeast Asia.[16] The skull probably belongs to a 16- to 17-year-old adolescent girl.[14] Unfossilised Manis paleojavanica (Asian giant pangolin) bone dated back to 30,000 BC was also found in the proximity of the "Deep Skull",[17] as well as with the Mesolithic and Neolithic burial sites inside the Niah Caves.[18]

History[edit]

Brooke administration[edit]

Charles Hose advocated Miri oil exploration to Royal Dutch Shell.
Miri Well No. 1 in 1910
Miri street view in 1925

Charles Brooke succeeded James Brooke as the new Rajah of Sarawak in 1868. By 1883, Sultan of Brunei (Sultan Abdul Momin) ceded the Baram region (including Miri) to Charles Brooke.[19][20] The fourth division of Sarawak was immediately created with the installation of Claude Champion de Crespigny as the first Resident of the Division.[20] The Miri area was still a fishing village at that time.[21] It was a small settlement surrounded by mangrove and Nipah palm jungles consisted of 20 scattered houses, a few wooden shops operated by Chinese traders and a lone Arab trader.[22] A fort was built in Claudetown (present day Marudi, 43 km to the east of Miri)[23] in 1883. Claudetown became the administrative centre of the division. Mr Claude's administration was helped by two junior officers, 30 rangers, and a few native police.[24] Charles Hose succeeded Mr Claude as the new Resident in 1891 and the fort in Marudi was renamed as "Fort Hose". To restore peace among various ethnic tribes fighting in the Baram region, Charles Hose decided to organise a peace conference at his fort in April 1899. This peace conference also led to the birth of first Baram Regatta, a long boat race competition among the natives which continued to be held until today.[25]

The local population in Miri has indeed started to extract oil from hand-dug wells for centuries. Song Huiyao Jigao, a documentation of the Song dynasty of China, mentions the imports of Borneo camphor and petroleum in the 11th century. In 1882, Mr Claude reported to the Brooke government on 18 hand-dug oil wells in the Miri area. He also recommended that area near Miri River should be thoroughly explored. However, his recommendations were ignored. But when Charles Hose took over the Resident office in 1891, he was interested in Mr Claude's idea and began to collaborate with him. Mr Claude began to map oil seeps around the Miri area, however a consultant geologist from England discouraged the oil exploration in Miri due to poor logistical conditions. After his retirement from administrative positions in Sarawak, Charles Hose went back to England. He later went to London to discuss the idea of oil exploration in Miri with the Anglo-Saxon Petroleum Company (later became a part of Royal Dutch Shell Company in 1907). Mr. H.N. Benjamin, a branch manager from the petroleum company, was interested in this idea. Finally in 1909, Rajah Charles Brooke came to London to sign the first Sarawak Oil Mining Lease. Royal Dutch Shell dispatched a senior geologist named Josef Theodor Erb together with Charles Hose back to Miri. Mr Erb started to map Miri oil fields from August 1909 to July 1910. He also identified a location known as "Miri Hill" (now known as "Canada Hill", 150 m above sea level) is suitable to act as an anticline for oil drilling.[21][26]

The Residency Building in Miri was originally used as an administration building for the British before been turned into Japanese headquarters during their occupation in Miri.

Finally, on 10 August 1910, the first oil drilling operation was started. A 30-metre-high rig (nicknamed the "Grand Old Lady") made up of wooden derricks and cable tool drilling was used in the operation by Royal Dutch Shell. On 22 December 1910, oil was struck after 130 metres of drilling at the well. Royal Dutch Shell also founded a subsidiary company named Sarawak Oil Field Ltd, which now operated as Sarawak Shell Berhad. Since then, another 624 land wells have been drilled around Miri until 1972 which are collectively known as the "Miri field". The Miri field is the only onshore field in Sarawak. It is because oil production has been shifted to offshore since the late 1950s. The first oil well on Canada Hill (Miri Well No. 1) produced a total of 0.65 million oil barrels for the next 60 years until its closure on 31 October 1972.[21] The first oil refinery and submarine pipeline was built in Miri in 1914. The oil refinery has since been relocated to Lutong (11 km to the north of Miri) in 1916.[27]

Resident Office moved from Marudi to Miri in 1912. Miri grew as fast as the rate of oil production by the Shell company. In 1920, roads were built in Miri. Bicycles and motorcycles were also bought into the town.[22] By 1921, there were 40 shop houses in Miri, with one English school and one Chinese school. Motor cars were later introduced to the town. In 1924, Pujut Road was built to link Miri with Lutong. By 1925, rotary drilling was introduced. Oil production continued to increase until it reached a peak of 15,211 barrels per day in 1929. Water supply were improved, jungles were cleared, and more roads were built.[28] Miri became the administrative centre of the entire Baram region in 1929.[29]

Japanese occupation[edit]

The Brooke government destroyed Lutong oil refinery and storage facilities before the arrival of the Japanese.
Damaged oil refinery installations at Lutong in 1945 due to Allied bombings
Impact from Allied bombardment on the town

The Brooke government had been actively lobbying for the British government to accept Sarawak as one of its protectorates in an event of a war. By 1888, the British finally agreed to grant the protection to Sarawak. The British dispatched several troops to Sarawak to strengthen its defences in the 1930s. By 1938, under the leadership of Rajah Charles Vyner Brooke, airstrips were constructed in Miri, Kuching, Oya, and Mukah in preparation for an imminent war. However, by 1941, British Royal Navy and Royal Air Force had withdrawn from Sarawak and returned to Singapore. Therefore, the British government advocated a "scorched earth policy" for the Brooke government in the event of a Japanese attack. A Denial Scheme was formulated to destroy oil installations in Miri and Lutong. This was because the coastline measuring 30 miles from Lutong to Miri was impossible to defend from Japanese landings due to shortage of manpower. By May 1941, 1 Infantry Company from 2/15 Punjab Regiment,[30] 6-inch Hong Kong-Singapore Royal Artillery Battery, and 1 Platoon of Royal Engineers were stationed at Miri to oversee the destruction of the Miri oil fields. In August 1941, an operation was carried out to reduce Miri oil output by 70%.[31]

Soon after the news of Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, Japanese planes were seen making reconnaissance flights over Miri.[32] The Brooke government decided on a complete destruction of oilfields and airfields in Miri. Shell company officials received orders to carry out the Denial Scheme on 8 December 1941. In the evening on the same day, the task was completed.[31] All producing oil wells were sealed up with vital equipment and machinery dismantled and shipped off to Singapore. Skilled workers and important company papers also went along with the equipment and sent to Singapore.[32] The Punjab Regiment and several officials were sent to guard Kuching.[31] On 16 December 1941, 9 days after the Pearl Harbor bombing, Japanese troops consisting of 10,000 men landed on Tanjung Lobang Beach, Miri without much resistance.[31] However, on 19 December 1941, a Dutch flying boat from Tarakan Island attacked the Japanese destroyer Shinonome (under the command of Hiroshi Sasagawa) off Miri. The ship was sunk along with the entire crew of 228.[33] Another flying boat X-33 also damaged a Japanese transport ship.[31] After the fall of Singapore on 15 January 1942, skilled workers that went into hiding with their equipment were sent back to Miri by the Japanese. They were immediately put to work for Japanese oil supply service company named Nen Ryo Hai Kyu. Much of the Japanese oil drilling and refinery equipment was portable. A total of 0.75 million barrels were produced during the Japanese occupation from 1941 to 1945.[32]

During the occupation, Miri and Lutong became a periodic subject of Allied air raids and bombings. Food, clothes, and medicine were scarce. Workers of the Japanese oil supply service were used to reconstruct and maintain Lutong Bridge and Lutong airstrip from Allied bombing damage.[32]

Recent developments[edit]

Miri town in 1983

Petronas, a Malaysian national oil and gas company, was formed in 1974. As a result, a concession system was changed into production sharing contract system (PSC) between Shell and Petronas. The first two PSCs were signed on 30 November 1976. Petronas formed a company named Petronas Carigali Sdn Bhd which was directly involved in the exploration, development, and production of oil and gas in the country. Petronas also initiated the Baram Delta Gas Gathering (Bardegg) project which involves the collection[34] and compression of gas from five fields, namely Betty, Bekor, Baram, Baronia, and West Lutong, located 10 km to 45 km offshore from Miri. This is to ensure the minimisation of gas loss during oil production. Petronas and Shell are also involved in educational outreach activities such as awarding scholarships to deserving students. Both companies are also involved in Malaysian first rig-to-reef project, in an effort to preserve bio-marine life in the sea offshore Miri. In this project, an abandoned offshore platform was made to become part of the Siwa reef.[27] Both companies also started to establish Piasau Nature Reserve in 2014.[35]

Miri Municipal Council has adopted the seahorse as the town's official symbol. It was proposed by the former Sarawak chief minister Abdul Taib Mahmud and introduced as part of the "I love Miri campaign" in 1994. The seahorse is chosen because of its beautiful and distinctive figure with gentle and graceful motion. These characteristics describe multiple ethnic and cultural identities of Miri which live in peace and harmony with good values of life. It also denotes the location of Miri town near to the sea and coral reefs and the city status as a resort paradise.[36][37]

Miri was elevated to city status on 20 May 2005 and became Malaysia's tenth city.[38] Miri is also the first town in Malaysia which is not a state capital to be granted city status.[39] Miri City Day is celebrated each year on 20 May since it was declared by the past Chief Minister, Abdul Taib Mahmud.[40] A time capsule containing news article of the day and a souvenir book was buried at Petroleum Science Museum at Canada Hill, Miri. The time capsule will be opened 100 years later on 20 May 2105.[41] An effort has also been made to develop Miri as liveable resort city.[42]

Governance[edit]

Miri City currently elects one member of parliament from the Miri parliamentary seat (P.219) into the Parliament of Malaysia. The city also elects 3 state assemblymen into the Sarawak State Legislative Assembly, namely Piasau, Pujut, and Senadin.[43]

Local authority and city definition[edit]

Miri was formerly administered by the Miri Municipal Council for 24 years. It was upgraded to Miri City Council (MCC) on 20 May 2005,[44] with Lawrence Lai Yew Son as its current mayor,[1] headquartered at Raja Road, Miri. Area under the jurisdiction of MCC is 977.43 km2.[2] Miri lies within the boundary of the Miri District, which consists of Miri City, Sibuti sub-district, and Niah sub-district,[45] with a total population of 290,274[46] and total area of 4,707 km2.[47] Miri Resident Office and Miri District Office are located at Kingsway Road, Miri City.[48]

Geography[edit]

Miri City as seen from satellite image
Weather radar station on Canada Hill in Miri

Miri is situated on the alluvial plain of the Baram River on the western shore of northern Sarawak on the island of Borneo. Locally the Baram River is called the Miri River. Because of the prevailing southerly off-shore current, beach drift has built up the Peninsula Road as a barrier beach between the Miri River and the shore causing a "Yazoo effect"[49] where the river runs parallel to the coast before breaking through into the South China Sea. The city is predominately located on the inland (east) side of the Miri River with only a few scattered residential neighbourhoods, a Golf Club and a small airstrip on the Peninsula Road.[50]

Climate[edit]

Miri has a tropical rainforest climate. There are two monsoon seasons: the southwest monsoon, which is the dry season from April to September, and the northeast monsoon, which is the wet season from October to March. The annual rainfall is around 250 to 380 cm (100 to 150 inches). The air temperature is between 23 °C (73 °F) to 32 °C (90 °F) the whole year round. But in rare occasions, temperature can reach down to 18 °C (64 °F) to 16 °C (61 °F) especially in the months of November, December and January. Lowest ever recorded is in December 2010 when the temperature dropped down to 11 °C (52 °F).[51]

Climate data for Miri (1971–2000)
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °C (°F) 29.9
(85.8)
30.2
(86.4)
30.9
(87.6)
31.3
(88.3)
31.6
(88.9)
31.5
(88.7)
31.2
(88.2)
31.3
(88.3)
31.0
(87.8)
30.7
(87.3)
30.5
(86.9)
30.3
(86.5)
30.9
(87.6)
Average low °C (°F) 23.1
(73.6)
23.2
(73.8)
23.5
(74.3)
23.8
(74.8)
23.9
(75)
23.6
(74.5)
23.3
(73.9)
23.4
(74.1)
23.4
(74.1)
23.4
(74.1)
23.3
(73.9)
23.3
(73.9)
23.4
(74.1)
Average rainfall mm (inches) 240.5
(9.469)
160.5
(6.319)
134.4
(5.291)
177.9
(7.004)
193.7
(7.626)
204.9
(8.067)
179.4
(7.063)
210.9
(8.303)
249.5
(9.823)
317.2
(12.488)
295.5
(11.634)
349.2
(13.748)
2,713.6
(106.835)
Average rainy days (≥ 1.0 mm) 14 10 9 12 13 12 11 12 14 17 17 18 159
Mean monthly sunshine hours 170.3 172.1 201.8 216.5 220.0 205.6 213.3 202.3 184.6 184.4 189.0 185.4 2,345.3
Source #1: World Meteorological Organisation[52]
Source #2: NOAA (sun, 1961–1990)[53]

Demography[edit]

People from Miri are called "Mirians".[54]

The growth of Miri population is shown below:

Year 1940 1960 1970 1980 1991 2000 2010
Total
population
11,000[26] 24,049[44] 34,613[55] 52,125[56][57] 102,878[57] 167,535[56][57] 234,541[4]

Ethnicity[edit]

According to the 2010 Malaysian census, Miri City has a total population of 234,541. Indigenous people form the largest ethnic group in the city (143,736, 61.3%) which consists of Iban (61,273), Malay (46,723), Melanau (8,313), Bidayuh (3,308), and other indigenous tribes (24,119). This is followed by Chinese (75,329, 32.1%), Indians (980, 0.43%), and non-Malaysians (13,362, 5.7%).[58] The Malay people here consists mainly of Mirek, Dalik, Berawan, and Bakong people.[11] Miri has 19 out of 27 Sarawak ethnic groups,[59] including Kedayan, Lun Bawang, Kayan, Kenyah, and Kelabit people. Chinese in Miri mainly consist of Hakka, Cantonese, and a small number of Teochews and Hainanese.[60] A majority of non-Malaysians in Miri are Suluk and Bajau people from the southern Philippines, working at Baram Delta as fishermen.[61][62] There are also illegal Suluk and Bajau people entering Miri using Pulau Tikus (near Baram Delta) as a transit point.[63]

Languages[edit]

Mandarin, English, and Malay languages are widely spoken here. Respective ethnic groups also speak their own dialects. Indigenous groups speak dialects such as Iban, Bidayuh, Kayan, Kenyah, and Kelabit languages. Meanwhile, the Chinese would speak Mandarin, Hakka Chinese, Cantonese, Teochew dialect, Hainanese,[64] and Fuzhou dialect.[65] However, younger generations in Miri tend to use mainstream languages (English and Malay) rather than dialects (Iban and Kelabit), and an effort has been made to promote the usage of the dialects among the younger generation.[66][67]

Religion[edit]

There are several religions in Miri including Taoism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism,[68] Sikhism[69] and Bahá'í Faith. Among the Christian churches, there are the Borneo Evangelical Church, Anglicanism, Methodism, Roman Catholics, and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.[70][71] Respective religious groups are free to hold processions in Miri city.[72][73] Among notable religious places in Miri are: Tua Pek Kong Temple,[74] Lian Hua San Ching Tien Temple (莲花山三清殿, Taoist temple),[75] St Joseph Cathedral (Roman Catholic),[76] Hwai En Methodist Church, St Columba church (Anglican),[77] Al-Taqwa Mosque, Al-Jamek Mosque,[78] Sikh Temple, and Kamini Durga Eswari Amman Temple (Hinduism).[79]

Economy[edit]

Sarawak Shell Berhad

There are 3 industrial areas in Miri namely: Kuala Baram Industrial Estate (Mixed, Light, and Medium Industries), Piasau Industrial Estate (Mixed Light Industries), and Bekenu Light Industrial Area (food processing).[80]

Miri mainly relies on its oil and gas industry, which contributes significantly to the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) of Sarawak.[81] Sarawak Shell Berhad (upstream business) and Petronas Carigali Sdn Bhd have their offices based in Miri.[82][83] Other multinational oil and gas companies also set up their offices here, including Nippon Oil,[84] Schlumberger,[85] Baker Hughes,[86] Halliburton,[87] Technip,[88] Ranhill WorleyParsons,[89] and Petra Resources Sdn Bhd.[90] In 1989, Asam Paya Oilfield was discovered in Sarawak inland areas. In 2010, Petronas discovered two oil fields offshore between Bintulu and Miri. In 2011, new underground reserves of oil and gas deposits were discovered by Nippon Oil in an inland region near Miri, Sarawak.[91]

In the 1970 to 1980s, timber exporting industry became one of the major income generators for Miri.[92][93] Multinational conglomerates based in Miri such as Shin Yang[94] and Samling had their early beginnings in timber industry.[95] Besides, shipbuilding companies such as Sealink Shipyard,[96] Shin Yang Shipping & Shipyard,[97] Berjaya Dockyard,[98] and Sarawak Slipways[99] have their major shipyards set up in Miri - Kuala Baram industrial area along the Baram river.

First large-scale oil palm plantation in Sarawak began in 1968, in which the newly formed Sarawak Oil Palm Berhad (SOPB) planted a total of 5,000-hectare (50 km2) oil palm plantations near Miri by employing Indonesian workers at these plantations. Since the 1980s, SOPB has a total of 30,000-hectare (300 km2) of oil palm in Miri and Bintulu Divisions, generating a total revenue of RM 85 million in 2005. SOPB is now majority-owned by Shin Yang Group and Sarawak Land Custody and Development Authority (LCDA)[100] with its headquarters based in Miri.[101] By 2014, oil palm plantations between Miri-Bintulu zone constituted 60% of total oil palm estates in Sarawak.[102]

A Chinese shop in Miri selling a variety of needs

Miri Port Authority (MPA) was established on 1 February 1981 and commenced operation on 1 March 1983. It is located near the mouth of Baram River.[103] The port is able to take in ships measuring up to 1,500 GRT (Gross Register Tonnage), with general cargo area of 50,895 m2 and total developed area of 34 hectares (0.34 km2).[104] It is mainly used in handling petroleum, timber products, coal, and building materials. A total of 23.94 million metric tonnes of goods was handled by MPA from 2011 to 2013, which earned a total revenue of RM 48.58 million in port dues.[105]

Miri is a popular shopping destination for visitors coming from the neighbouring country of Brunei[106] because of a discrepancy in currency exchange rate (100 Brunei dollar to 250 Malaysian ringgit), cheaper items, and a variety of resorts here in Miri for recreational activities. Bintang Plaza and Boulevard Shopping Mall are the two major shopping destinations for Brunei people.[107] As of 2014, Miri visitor movement along Kuala Baram-Kuala Belait checkpoint (Sungai Tujoh, along the Sarawak-Brunei border) reached a total of 2.9 million people in one year.[108] Miri is also an eco-tourism gateway to four national parks and a marine national park.

The education sector is another income generator for Miri. Curtin University Sarawak brought in RM 480 million foreign exchange annually from 3,000 foreign students studying at the university.[109]

Transportation[edit]

Land[edit]

All the roads in Miri are maintained by Miri City Council (MCC). Miri is accessible by road from Bandar Seri Begawan (Brunei) through the Sungai Tujuh checkpoint which is located 35 km north of Miri.[110] Miri is connected to all major cities and towns in Sarawak including Kota Kinabalu in Sabah through the Pan Borneo Highway. Miri is also connected to Bintulu town through a coastal road[111] and Marudi through a 42 km road.[23] ASEAN Bridge is located along the Miri-Baram Highway and crosses the Baram River, providing direct access to neighbouring country of Brunei, and the towns of Limbang and Lawas in Sarawak.[112]

Public transportation[edit]

Miri city has 2 bus stations, namely the local (located at Melayu Road next to Tamu Muhibbah and Visitor's Information Centre) and long-distance bus stations (located near Pujut Corner).[7] The local bus station serves the Miri city area, Bakam area, Miri Airport, and Brunei.[113] Buses to Niah National Park, Lambir Hills National Park, Bintulu, Sibu, Kuching, and Pontianak, Indonesia depart from the long-distance bus station.[7] Local taxi services are also provided in the city with the main taxi stand at China Road in the city centre. Taxis here do not use meters.[7]

Air[edit]

MASwings aircraft beside another bigger aircraft in Miri Airport

Miri Airport (IATA: MYY, ICAO: WBGR) is an important gateway to the northern region of Sarawak. It is located 11 km south of Miri city. It serves as a hub for domestic, international, and rural air services.[114] Miri Airport is the third busiest airport in Malaysia, in terms of aircraft movements and the fifth busiest in terms of passengers handled. It provides services to 2.2 million passengers in 2013.[115] The airport has direct international flights to Singapore and Manila via AirAsia.[116] It also receives flights from domestic destinations such as Kuala Lumpur, Johor Bahru, Penang, Kuala Terengganu, Kota Kinabalu, Labuan, Kuching and other major towns in Sarawak.[7] Miri Airport also caters flights to the Sarawak interior such as Bario, Ba'kelalan, Marudi, Lawas, Limbang, and Mukah[114] through MASwings using DHC-6 Twin Otter aircraft. Currently, there are three airlines serving Miri airport, namely Malaysia Airlines, Air Asia, and MASwings.[7]

Water[edit]

Kuala Baram Express Boat Jetty is located 45 minutes away from Miri city centre. There are daily departures to Marudi, Long Lama area, and Gunung Mulu National Park by using express boats.[117][118]

Other utilities[edit]

Courts of law and legal enforcement[edit]

The current court complex is located at Merdu Road, Miri.[119] It contains the High Court,[120] Sessions Court, and the Magistrate Court.[121] Miri city also has Syariah Subordinate Court which is located at Wisma Pelita Tunku, Miri with area of jurisdiction of Miri District and Marudi District.[122] There is one district police headquarters at Pujut Road, Miri. Miri central police station is located at Raja Road while other police stations are located at Bakam Road, Miri Airport, Kampung Tulang Road, Bekenu, and Niah.[123] There is also a central prison in Miri.[124]

Healthcare[edit]

Miri General Hospital started operation in 6 May 1995, located 2.5 km away from Miri city centre and with an area of 87.11 hectares. The hospital has 339 beds, and it provides specialist services such as surgery, ophthalmology, obstetrics and gynaecology (ONG), and radiology.[125] It is also the secondary referral hospital in the northern region of Sarawak.[126][127] There are also 2 polyclinics in Miri namely Miri polyclinic[128] and Tudan polyclinic.[129] Miri City Medical Centre is a private hospital that started its operation in 2002 and has 30 beds. It is located at Hokkien Road, Miri.[130] Columbia Asia Medical Centre was formerly known as Selesa Medical Centre. It was acquired in 1998, located 4 km downtown Miri. It serves the communities from Miri, Limbang, Marudi, and Brunei. Shell employees make up the largest customer base for this private hospital.[131]

Education[edit]

SMK Chung Hua Miri

All the primary and secondary schools in Miri (under National Education System) are managed by the Miri District Education Office located at Kipas Road, Miri.[132] Among the Chinese primary schools are SJK (C) Chung Hua Miri, SJK (C) Chung Hua Pujut, and SJK (C) Chung Hua Lutong.[133][134] SK Agama Miri is an Islamic primary school.[135] There are several national primary schools such as: SK Anchi,[136] SK Senandin,[137] and SK St Columba,[138] along with several other national secondary schools in Miri namely SMK Chung Hua Miri, SMK Agama Miri, SMK St. Columba, Kolej Tun Datu Tuanku Haji Bujang, and Sekolah Menengah Vokasional Miri.[139][140] Miri has 2 out of 14 Chinese independent schools in Sarawak. These are Pei Min Middle School (培民中学) and Riam Road Middle School (廉律中学).[141] Tenby International School is the first international school in Miri.[142] Other private schools in Miri such as Sekolah Rendah Sri Mawar and Sekolah Rendah Sri Mulia are providers of primary education.

Curtin University Sarawak is the first foreign university to establish its campus in Sarawak since 1999.[143] It offers business, accounting, and engineering courses.[144] Institut Pendidikan Guru Malaysia Kampus Miri Sarawak (Teachers training Institute Malaysia Miri Campus) offers training for teachers placements in primary and secondary schools.[145] I-Systems College offers a nursing programme.[146] Fajar International College (FIC) offers a Diploma in Occupational Safety & Health (DIPOSH), accounting, and business studies courses.[147] IBS College was established in 1998, currently offering finance, business, accounting, and security courses.[148] Maxcel Institute of Management offers Diploma programme for Hotel and Tourism Management.[149]

Cahaya Education and Training Academy (Ceta) offers training courses on oil and gas industries.[150] Institut Latihan Perindustrian Miri (Miri Industry Training Institute) was formed in 2004, currently offering courses such as electrician, product design, and telecommunication.[151] RIAM Institute of Technology Sarawak (RIAMTEC) was established in 1996, offering technical training in the fields of agriculture and mechanics.[152] Institut Kemahiran Belia Negara (National Youth skills Institute)[153] and Pusat Pembangunan Kemahiran Sarawak (Sarawak Skills Development Centre) also offer technical training for students.[154] Kolej Komuniti Miri (Miri Community College) offers short module courses upon request from the public.[155] Open University Malaysia (OUM) also opens a learning centre here.[156]

Libraries[edit]

Miri City Council Library was established in 1958. Currently, it has branches in Piasau, Lutong, and Taman Tunku.[157] Pustaka Miri is a regional library established by Kuching-based Sarawak State Library. It is located at Miri City Fan.[158]

Culture and leisure[edit]

Attractions and recreational spots[edit]

Cultural[edit]

Miri May Fest has been held in Miri since 1989.[159] It is a month-long celebration of entertainment programmes, trade fairs, cultural, arts, sports, and social activities organised by various governmental agencies. Miri City Day will also be held during the Miri May Fest.[160][161] Gong Xi Fa Cai Bazaar is held annually a few weeks before the Chinese New Year eve. There will be stalls opening daily selling food and drinks, clothes, decorative items, potted plants, paintings, and handicrafts. Various entertainment programmes such as lion and dragon dances will be held every evening.[162][163] Miri International Dance for Humanity is held annually since 2004 by Miri Chapter of Malaysian Red Crescent Society to promote racial and cultural harmony. This event will showcase up to 40 to 50 multicultural dance troupes which attract an audience of around 3,500.[164] No dancing competition will be held during this event. Donation cards will be distributed to raise funds for the Red Crescent Society.[165][166] 916 Malaysia Day Countdown cum Street Party has been held annually since 2010. It consists of a variety of outdoor sports events, street parties, and entertainment programmes which runs beyond midnight to commemorate the formation of Malaysia on 16 September 1963.[167] Miri International Deep Sea Fishing Tournament is held annually at Luconia Shoals at South China Sea. Participants will depart from the Marina May, Miri and head up to the ocean for 3 days. The participant who catches the biggest fish in that category wins.[168][169] Miri city Christmas Parade is held annually since 2007. Churches in Miri would start the parade at Miri City Fan and cover the main streets in the city centre.[170][171]

Historical[edit]

Grand Old Lady at the Petroleum Museum

In 2005, a petroleum museum was opened in Miri to preserve the city's roots as an oil and gas city.[172] The petroleum museum is built at the site of "Grand Old Lady", the first oil well in Malaysia which was opened in 1910.[173] Visitors are able to interact with advanced devices displayed in the museum.[174] Niah Archeology Museum is located near the archaeological site of Niah cave. It exhibits the prehistorical artefacts found in the area.[175] Baram Regional Museum was opened in 1997, housed inside Fort Hose at Marudi. The fort was burnt down in 1994, but it was rebuilt later according to its original design and was converted into a museum. It displays historical and cultural artefacts belonging to various ethnic groups living in the area.[176] The Miri Tua Pek Kong Temple was built in 1913[177] to give thanks to a monk who was believed to chase away evil spirits. The evil spirits were believed to have caused an unknown epidemic in Miri. It is the only building which survives World War II.[74]

Leisure and conservation areas[edit]

Hawaii Beach, Miri
Taman Awam Miri (Miri Public Park)

Miri is surrounded by five national parks namely: Gunung Mulu National Park, Niah National Park, Lambir Hills National Park, Loagan Bunut National Park and Miri-Sibuti Coral Reef National Park. Tanjung Lobang Beach is the oldest recreational park in Miri. It is a popular spot for watching sunsets. There are two wooden piers extending out into the ocean which offer a view of the coastline and the seahorse lighthouse at Marina Bay. Taman Selera (which serves seafood meals), Miri Marriott Hotel and Parkcity Everly Hotel are located at Tanjung Lobang Beach.[178] Marina Bay also has berthing facilities for yachts.[179] Hawaii Beach is located 15 minutes away from Miri city. Picnic and barbecue facilities are provided here.[180] Lutong Beach is suitable for paragliding and paramotor sports.[181] Luak Esplanade Beach is located 11 km south of the city. It is a popular spot for barbecues and picnics.[182][183] Further down the Luak Esplanade Beach is Bungai Beach, which is located at Bekenu, about 1 hour drive from Miri city.[184]

Miri Bulatan Park was opened to the public in 1993. It has a man-made lake, a jogging track, and a traffic garden. Traffic games will held every year at Miri Bulatan Park.[185] Taman Awam Miri (Miri Public Park) is located 3 km away from Miri city centre. It has a children's playground, botanical garden, and a jogging trail.[186] Miri City Fan is an urban park complex that has a variety of theme gardens, botanical garden, a swimming pool, a library, and an amphitheatre where concerts are frequently held.[187][188] Taman Bunga (Flower Garden) is located at Asrama Road. Every plant here has a label which list the name and characteristics of the plant.[189][190]

Other attractions[edit]

Miri Crocodile Farm is located near the Baram Delta. It houses 1,000 estuarine crocodiles including Malayan gharial crocodiles. Man-made sanctuary pools are also constructed for the crocodiles. Other animals can also be found here such as cassowary, sun bears, python, monkeys and porcupines. Visitors are allowed to feed the animals with bananas available from the canteen.[191][192]

Shopping[edit]

The shopping malls in Miri are Bintang Megamall,[193] Boulevard Shopping Complex,[194] The Imperial Mall,[195] E-Mart,[196] Merdeka Mall,[197] Miri Plaza (Servay Hypermarket),[198] MYY Mall,[199] Permy Mall,[200] Soon Hup Shopping Complex,[201] Wisma Pelita Tunku,[202] and Permaisuri Imperial City Mall.[203]

Saberkas Weekend Market is located at Sarbekas Commercial Centre. It opens in late evening every Friday, Saturday and Sunday. There are over 170 stalls in the market which sell vegetables, fruits, sea products, drinks, satay, grilled fish, BBQ chicken wings and other products such as local handicrafts, clothes as well as used magazines at reasonable prices.[204][205] Miri Handicraft Centre is located at Brooke Road, Miri.[206] It features handicrafts and souvenirs of Sarawak such as colourful bags, beadwork, woodcarvings, and textiles made by local indigenous groups, Chinese, and Malay artisans.[207][208]

Entertainment[edit]

There are around three cinemas operating in Miri: Golden Screen Cinemas,[209] TGV Cinemas,[210] and Star Cineplex.[211] Several entertainment outlets such as Season 1 Karaoke & KTV lounge, Lot 9 Karaoke, Wheels Bistro Café,[212] Pelita Commercial Centre,[213] BARcelona Spanish Tapas Y Vinos,[214][215] Broadway Lounge at Grand Palace Hotel, KTV Lounge and Pub at Mega Hotel, and Ruai Lobby Lounge at Parkcity Everly Hotel also had a presence in the city.[211]

Music[edit]

There are 3 music festivals in Miri, namely Borneo Jazz Festival, Asia Music Festival (AMF), and Miri Country Music Fest (MCMF). Borneo Jazz Festival was started in 2006.[216] It is a 2-night festival of 4 performances in each night by local and international jazz musicians at Parkcity Everly hotel, Miri.[217][218] Asia Music Festival is also a 2-day event featuring artists and musicians from Asian countries such as India, Taiwan, Philippines, and Indonesia.[219] It was first held in 2013 at Eastwood Valley Golf and Country Club, about 5 km from the city centre. It attracts about 4,000 music lovers attending the event.[220] Miri Country Music Fest (MCMF) is a one-day event introduced in 2014, held at Parkcity Everly Hotel, Miri. Among the activities that can be found here are music and dance workshop, and night concert featuring country music bands from all over the world. Stalls selling food items, games, and souvenir items are also available.[221][222]

Cuisine[edit]

A bowl of bird nest soup in Miri

Miri Central Market (also known as Miri Open Air Market) is located at the Miri Old Town centre. It offers a wide choices of local food whose recipes which have been passed on for generations.[223][224] Popular local delicacies such as Miri curry rice,[225] chicken porridge,[224] open air kolo mee,[226] and Char kway teow can be found here.[227] Exotic dishes of pig's stomach cooked with pineapple and pig's blood with chives can also be found at the central market.[228] There are also a variety of restaurants in Miri that offer seafood, Western food, Chinese, Japanese, and Muslim food.[229] Authentic cuisine from Kelabit Highlands especially from Bario can also be found here.[230] Chinese dim sum cuisine can be found at 2020 cafe in Miri.[231]

Notable people[edit]

International relations[edit]

Several countries have set up their consulates in Miri, including Netherlands[240] and the United Kingdom.[240]

Sister cities[edit]

Miri currently has two sister cities:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Official Website of Miri City Council - Mayor message". Miri City Council. Retrieved 19 March 2015. 
  2. ^ a b c "Miri Council ... in Brief". Official Website of Miri City Council. Official Website of Miri City Council. 4 September 2014. Retrieved 7 September 2014. 
  3. ^ "Miri, Malaysia Weather History and Climate Data". World Climate. Archived from the original on 7 January 2004. Retrieved 21 March 2015. 
  4. ^ a b c "Population Distribution by Local Authority Areas and Mukims, 2010 (page 1)" (PDF). Department of Statistics, Malaysia. Archived from the original (PDF) on 5 February 2015. Retrieved 19 March 2015. 
  5. ^ "Miri, Sarawak to Kuching, Sarawak". Google Maps. Archived from the original on 21 March 2015. Retrieved 21 March 2015. 
  6. ^ "Miri, Sarawak to Kota Kinabalu, Sabah". Google Maps. Archived from the original on 21 March 2015. Retrieved 21 March 2015. 
  7. ^ a b c d e f g Sarawak Visitors' Guide 2014 - Miri (PDF). Sarawak: Sarawak Tourism Board. 2014. pp. 73, 78. Archived from the original (PDF) on 21 March 2015. 
  8. ^ "Diving in Miri-Sibuti Coral Reefs National Park". Sarawak Tourism Board. Archived from the original on 21 March 2015. Retrieved 21 March 2015. 
  9. ^ "Miri Nature Society: Coral reefs in Miri under threat". The Borneo Post. 21 June 2010. Archived from the original on 22 February 2014. Retrieved 21 March 2015. 
  10. ^ a b "Jatti Meirek want candidate from their community". The Borneo Post. 17 October 2014. Archived from the original on 17 May 2015. Retrieved 17 May 2015. 
  11. ^ a b Sather, Clifford (September 1979). "Recent studies of Orang Miri" (PDF). Borneo Research Bulletin 11 (2): 42–44. Retrieved 1 April 2015. 
  12. ^ The Nippon Foundation Fellowships for Asian Public Intellectuals (2014). Engage! Public Intellectuals Transforming Society (PDF). Sunta Press Co Ltd. p. 134. Archived from the original (PDF) on 18 May 2015. Retrieved 17 May 2015. 
  13. ^ a b "Niah National Park - Early Human settlements". Sarawak Forestry. Archived from the original on 18 February 2015. Retrieved 23 March 2015. 
  14. ^ a b Faulkner, Neil (7 November 2003). Niah Cave, Sarawak, Borneo. Current World Archaeology Issue 2. Archived from the original on 23 March 2015. Retrieved 23 March 2015. 
  15. ^ "History of the Great Cave of Niah". Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Archived from the original on 22 November 2014. Retrieved 23 March 2015. 
  16. ^ "Niah Cave". humanorigins.si.edu. Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History. Archived from the original on 22 November 2013. Retrieved 23 March 2015. 
  17. ^ Smith, Fumiko-Ikawa (1978). Early Paleolithic in South and East Asia. Walter de Gruyter. p. 50. ISBN 90-279-7899-9. Retrieved 23 March 2015. 
  18. ^ Hirst, K. Kris. "Niah Cave (Borneo, Malaysia) - Anatomically modern humans in Borneo". about.com. Archived from the original on 23 December 2013. Retrieved 23 March 2015. 
  19. ^ "Chronology of Sarawak throughout the Brooke Era to Malaysia Day". The Borneo Post. 16 September 2011. Archived from the original on 6 February 2015. Retrieved 24 March 2015. 
  20. ^ a b "Laman Web Rasmi Pejabat Residen dan Daerah di Miri - Sejarah Miri (Official Website of Miri Resident and District Office - History of Miri)" (in Malay). Miri Resident and District Office. Retrieved 24 March 2015. 
  21. ^ a b c Sorkhabi, Rasoul. "Historical Highlight: Miri Field Seeps Helped, But Success Was a Higher Calling". American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG). Archived from the original on 24 March 2015. Retrieved 24 March 2015. 
  22. ^ a b Murang, Datu Ose; Ngenang, Anak Jangu (2010). Miri - People - Progress - Prosperity (in English and Malay). Malaysia: Miri Resident Office. p. 37. Retrieved 28 March 2015. 
  23. ^ a b Joseph, Anthony (28 May 2012). "Road upgrade will reduce Miri—Marudi travelling time". The Borneo Post. Archived from the original on 26 March 2015. Retrieved 26 March 2015. 
  24. ^ Hose, Charles; McDougall, William (1912). The pagan tribes of Borneo; a description of their physical, moral and intellectual condition, with some discussion of their ethnic relations, vol.2. Macmillan and Co. Ltd. p. 279. Archived from the original on 1 July 2002. Retrieved 24 March 2015. 
  25. ^ Madian, Amrizan (2011). "Baram Regatta A Testament Of Racial Harmony". Bernama. Archived from the original on 24 March 2015. Retrieved 24 March 2015. 
  26. ^ a b Sorkhabi, Rasoul (2010). History of oil: Sarawak - Miri 1910. GEO ExPro Magazine Vol 7, No 2. p. 44. Archived from the original on 24 March 2015. Retrieved 24 March 2015. 
  27. ^ a b "Miri – from where it all began". The Star (Malaysia). 20 May 2005. Archived from the original on 28 March 2015. Retrieved 28 March 2015. 
  28. ^ "A Little Excitement". Miri Resort City. Archived from the original on 18 March 2015. Retrieved 1 April 2015. 
  29. ^ "History of Miri". Curtin Sarawak Malaysia. Archived from the original on 5 November 2012. Retrieved 1 April 2015. 
  30. ^ "Labuan War Cemetery". Commonwealth War Graves Commission. Archived from the original on 17 May 2015. Retrieved 17 May 2015. 
  31. ^ a b c d e L, Klemen (1999–2000). "The Invasion of British Borneo in 1942". Forgotten Campaign: The Dutch East Indies Campaign 1941-1942. 
  32. ^ a b c d "Decline and War". MiriResortCity.com. Archived from the original on 19 March 2015. Retrieved 28 March 2015. 
  33. ^ Visser, Jan (1999–2000). "Who sank IJN destroyer Shinonome, December 1941?". Forgotten Campaign: The Dutch East Indies Campaign 1941-1942. 
  34. ^ "Shell, Petronas expand Baram Delta terms to include gas rights". The Star (Malaysia). 3 July 2014. Archived from the original on 18 March 2015. Retrieved 17 May 2015. 
  35. ^ "Sarawak Government Collaborates With Shell And Petronas To Conserve Environmental Biodiversity". Malaysian Shell Berhad. 10 May 2014. Archived from the original on 21 March 2015. Retrieved 17 May 2015. 
  36. ^ "Miri Macot--Sea Horse". Tan Chin Kian. Archived from the original on 16 April 2015. Retrieved 16 April 2015. 
  37. ^ Pan, Ivy; Goh, SC (2010). "Borneo Talk Highlight - Miri ecotourism" (PDF) 17. Bumi Serasi. p. 4. Retrieved 16 April 2015. The seahorse is the city’s mascot, gentle and graceful in motion, which aptly describes the multi ethnic and culture people living here, all with a smile for visitors who come here. 
  38. ^ Then, Stephen (20 May 2005). "Revelry as Miri turns city". The Star (Malaysia). Archived from the original on 29 March 2015. Retrieved 29 March 2015. 
  39. ^ "Miri to replace Kuching as Sarawak capital?". New Straits Times. 19 May 2014. Retrieved 19 May 2014. 
  40. ^ Joseph, Anthony (19 May 2013). "14,000 walk to celebrate Miri City Day". The Borneo Post. Archived from the original on 29 March 2015. Retrieved 29 March 2015. 
  41. ^ "Some of the outstanding achievements of the leadership of Pehin Sri Abdul Taib". New Sarawak Tribune. 29 March 2015. Retrieved 29 March 2015. 
  42. ^ "Miri aims to be ‘the most liveable resort city’". The Borneo Post. 24 July 2014. Archived from the original on 29 March 2015. Retrieved 29 March 2015. 
  43. ^ "Miri should have another parliamentary seat". The Borneo Post. 6 March 2015. Archived from the original on 29 March 2015. Retrieved 29 March 2015. 
  44. ^ a b "Background". Official Website of Miri City Council. Official Website of Miri City Council. 4 September 2014. Retrieved 1 April 2015. 
  45. ^ "Portai Rasmi Pentadbiran Bahagian Miri (Official Portal of Miri administrative Division)". Miri Resident Office. Retrieved 21 March 2015. 
  46. ^ "Total population by ethnic group, sub-district, and state, Malaysia, 2010 (Table 28.1, page 376)" (PDF). Statistics Department, Malaysia. Archived from the original (PDF) on 5 February 2015. Retrieved 18 March 2015. 
  47. ^ "Malaysia - Basic population characteristics by administrative districts" (PDF) (in English and Malay). Statistics Department, Malaysia. Archived from the original (PDF) on 21 May 2012. Retrieved 21 March 2015. 
  48. ^ "Hubungi Kami (Contact Us)" (in Malay). Miri Resident Office. Retrieved 21 March 2015. 
  49. ^ West, Terry R. (2010). Geology Applied to Engineering. Long Grove, Illinois: Waveland Press. pp. 234–235. ISBN 978-1-57766-655-4. 
  50. ^ Google Earth at 4°25′47″N 114°01′16″E / 4.42972°N 114.02111°E / 4.42972; 114.02111 expand out.
  51. ^ "December Climate History for Miri | Local | Malaysia". Myweather2.com. Retrieved 10 December 2013. 
  52. ^ "World Weather Information Service — Miri". World Meteorological Organisation. Retrieved 8 May 2014. 
  53. ^ "Miri Climate Normals 1961–1990". National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved 8 May 2014. 
  54. ^ "Mirian to represent Sarawak at public speaking contest". The Borneo Post. 9 October 2014. Archived from the original on 2 December 2014. Retrieved 5 April 2015. 
  55. ^ "Sarawak's Industrial City - Bintulu" (PDF). Sarawak, Malaysia: CH Williams Talhar Yong & Yeo Sdn. Bhd. 26 June 2004. Archived from the original (PDF) on 9 June 2015. Retrieved 9 June 2015. 
  56. ^ a b "Miri Healthy City". healthycity.sarawak.gov.my. Archived from the original on 15 July 2014. Retrieved 17 May 2015. 
  57. ^ a b c "Sibu, the centre of the Rajang basin". Sarawak Property Bulletin vol 2 issue 4. Sarawak, Malaysia: CH Williams Talhar Yong & Yeo Sdn. Bhd. 26 January 2005. Archived from the original on 14 February 2015. Retrieved 14 February 2015. 
  58. ^ "Population Distribution by Local Authority Areas and Mukims, 2010" (PDF). Statistics Department, Malaysia. December 2011. Archived from the original (PDF) on 1 April 2015. Retrieved 1 April 2015. 
  59. ^ "Curtin Sarawak - All about Miri". Curtin Sarawak. Archived from the original on 1 April 2015. Retrieved 1 April 2015. 
  60. ^ "Our people - Chinese". Sarawak Tourism Board. 28 August 2012. Archived from the original on 19 February 2015. Retrieved 1 April 2015. 
  61. ^ Then, Stephen (17 March 2015). "Stay away, foreign fishermen told". The Star (Malaysia). Archived from the original on 5 April 2015. Retrieved 5 April 2015. 
  62. ^ Abdullah, Mohammad (15 July 2013). "Foreigners using bombs to fish in Miri, claim locals". The Borneo Post. Archived from the original on 5 April 2015. Retrieved 5 April 2015. 
  63. ^ "Pulau Tikus may be transit point for illegal immigrants". The Borneo Post. 25 March 2015. Archived from the original on 5 April 2015. Retrieved 5 April 2015. 
  64. ^ "Information from the visitors' Guide to Miri". MiriResortCity.com. Archived from the original on 18 March 2015. Retrieved 4 April 2015. 
  65. ^ Sman, Cecilia B (18 November 2010). "Foochow gathering a shot in the arm for Miri". The Borneo Post. Archived from the original on 17 May 2015. Retrieved 17 May 2015. 
  66. ^ Subhasish, Dasgupta (30 November 2009). Social Computing: Concepts, Methodologies, Tools, and Applications: Concepts, Methodologies, Tools, and Applications. Idea Group Inc. pp. 714–715. Retrieved 17 May 2015. A recent example of this is an Internet forum to revive the use of the Kelabit language among the younger generation...As a network conducted on the Internet, the discussion list includes Kelabit who are living in Miri, Kuala Lumpur,... 
  67. ^ Francis, Mary (1 March 2014). "Nanta: Iban a language for learning". The Borneo Post. Archived from the original on 17 May 2015. Retrieved 17 May 2015. 
  68. ^ Raphael, Jacqueline (17 September 2011). "Miri Hindus to celebrate Navarathri with prayers". The Borneo Post. Archived from the original on 16 October 2014. Retrieved 2 April 2015. 
  69. ^ "Sikh Temple". Sarawak Tourism Board. Archived from the original on 4 April 2015. Retrieved 4 April 2015. 
  70. ^ "Sarawak Worship Places - Miri". Bombastic Borneo. Archived from the original on 6 February 2015. Retrieved 2 April 2015. 
  71. ^ "LDS Growth Case Studies". International Resources for Latter Day Saints. Archived from the original on 18 April 2014. Retrieved 2 April 2015. 
  72. ^ "Sea of Mirians in annual Christmas Parade of 15 churches". The Borneo Post. 7 December 2014. Archived from the original on 3 April 2015. Retrieved 3 April 2015. 
  73. ^ "Sarawak unique for religious unity — Abg Jo". The Borneo Post. 15 January 2014. Archived from the original on 3 April 2015. Retrieved 3 April 2015. 
  74. ^ a b Lai, Cindy (5 May 2010). "Tua Pek Kong always remembered and revered by Miri folk". The Star (Malaysia). Archived from the original on 5 April 2015. Retrieved 5 April 2015. 
  75. ^ "Taoism in Sarawak". etawau.com. Archived from the original on 7 July 2014. Retrieved 5 April 2015. 
  76. ^ "Miri Catholic diocese gets new bishop in 47-year-old". The Star (Malaysia). 1 November 2013. Archived from the original on 5 April 2015. Retrieved 5 April 2015. 
  77. ^ "The Consecration of St. Columba’s Church Miri". The Diocese of Kuching. Archived from the original on 5 April 2015. Retrieved 5 April 2015. 
  78. ^ "Miri Visitors' Guide". gomiri.com. Archived from the original on 10 February 2015. Retrieved 5 April 2015. 
  79. ^ "Society launches logo and website". The Borneo Post. 22 October 2012. Archived from the original on 5 April 2015. Retrieved 5 April 2015. 
  80. ^ "Industrial Estate by Division". sarawak.gov.my. Official website of the Sarawak Government. Archived from the original on 15 March 2015. Retrieved 3 July 2015. 
  81. ^ "2nd Borneo International Oil & Gas Expo in Miri" (PDF). 20 August 2013. p. 2. Retrieved 21 April 2014. 
  82. ^ "Offices and Installations". Shell Malaysia. Sarawak Shell Berhad (71978-W), 98100 Lutong, Locked Bag No.1, Jalan Shell, 98100 Lutong, Miri, Sarawak.Tel: 085-454 545. Fax: 085-452 030 
  83. ^ "Petronas Carigali Sdn Bhd". Yellow Pages Malaysia. Archived from the original on 4 April 2015. Retrieved 4 April 2015. 
  84. ^ "Contact Us". JX Nippon Oil and Gas Exploration. Archived from the original on 14 October 2014. Retrieved 4 April 2015. 
  85. ^ "Schlumberger WTA (M) Sdn Bhd". Yellow Pages Malaysia. Archived from the original on 4 April 2015. Retrieved 4 April 2015. 
  86. ^ "Baker Hughes (M) Sdn Bhd - Baker Atlas". MiriBiz.com. Archived from the original on 2 April 2015. Retrieved 4 April 2015. 
  87. ^ "Halliburton Energy Services (M) Sdn. Bhd.". MiriBiz.com. Archived from the original on 2 April 2015. Retrieved 4 April 2015. 
  88. ^ "TechNip South East Asia". TechNip. Archived from the original on 24 February 2015. Retrieved 4 April 2015. 
  89. ^ "Ranhill Worleyparsons Sdn Bhd ( Pujut )". MiriBiz. Archived from the original on 2 April 2015. Retrieved 4 April 2015. 
  90. ^ "Petra Energy - Contact Us - Regional Offices and Service Facilities". Petra Energy. Archived from the original on 18 August 2012. Retrieved 4 April 2015. 
  91. ^ "Rich deposits of crude oil and gas discovered in Sarawak’s inland areas". The Star (Malaysia). 22 April 2013. Archived from the original on 5 April 2015. Retrieved 4 April 2015. 
  92. ^ "'The Oil Town'". MiriResortCity.com. Archived from the original on 19 March 2015. Retrieved 5 April 2015. 
  93. ^ "Introduction to Miri". Curtin University of Technology, Sarawak. Archived from the original on 27 February 2011. Retrieved 5 April 2015. 
  94. ^ "Shin Yang Sdn. Bhd.". Miribiz.com. Archived from the original on 5 April 2015. Retrieved 5 April 2015. 
  95. ^ "Company Profiles". Forests Monitor. Archived from the original on 10 August 2014. Retrieved 5 April 2015. The Sarawak-based Samling Group of companies was founded by Datuk Yaw Teck Seng in the early 1960s. Operating from the town of Miri,... 
  96. ^ "About Us - The Sealink Group". The Sealink Group. Archived from the original on 5 April 2015. Retrieved 4 April 2015. Sealink Group is an Integrated Service Provider which builds, owns and operates a diverse fleet of offshore marine support vessels,... 
  97. ^ "SHIN YANG Shipping Corporation Berhad - About US". SHIN YANG Shipping Corporation Berhad. Archived from the original on 27 October 2014. Retrieved 4 April 2015. This Company's main operation is to build tugboats, barges, small vessels, and providing ship repairs services and up slipping. 
  98. ^ "Berjaya Dockyard Sdn Bhd - About Us". Berjaya Dockyard Sdn Bhd. Archived from the original on 5 April 2015. Retrieved 4 April 2015. Located in Miri, Sarawak, Berjaya Dockyard specialises in the construction of Offshore Support Vessels (OSVs) for the local and international offshore oil and gas industries,... 
  99. ^ "Sarawak Slipways Sdn Bhd - Company Profile". Sarawak Slipways Sdn Bhd. Retrieved 4 April 2015. Sarawak Slipways Sdn. Bhd. located at Miri is one of the longest established shipbuilding and ship repairing yards in Malaysia. The company was founded in 1967 and delivered probably the first steel ship constructed in Malaysia in the same year. 
  100. ^ Cramb, R.A. (19 October 2007). "Reinventing Dualism: Policy Narratives and Modes of Oil Palm Expansion in Sarawak" (PDF). Australia: Australian National University - Crawford School of Public Policy. p. 19. Retrieved 5 April 2015. 
  101. ^ "Sarawak Oil Palms Berhad - Contact Us". Sarawak Oil Palms Berhad. Retrieved 5 April 2015. Sarawak Oil Palms Berhad Headquarters, No. 124-126, Jalan Bendahara P.O.Box 547 98007 Miri Sarawak, Malaysia 
  102. ^ "Miri’s property outlook remains buoyant". The Borneo Post. 20 May 2014. Archived from the original on 23 May 2014. Retrieved 5 April 2015. 60 per cent of oil palm estates in Sarawak are located within the middle belt of Bintulu-Miri zone. 
  103. ^ "About MPA". Miri Port Authority. Retrieved 5 April 2015. 
  104. ^ "Facilities". Miri Port Authority. Retrieved 5 April 2015. 
  105. ^ "Form uniform mechanism to verify cargo amount — AG". The Borneo Post. 17 June 2014. Archived from the original on 5 April 2015. Retrieved 5 April 2015. 
  106. ^ Then, Stephen (14 January 2010). "Miri remains as top draw for Bruneians". The Star (Malaysia). Archived from the original on 5 April 2015. Retrieved 5 April 2015. 
  107. ^ "Miri still a shopping paradise for Bruneians". The Borneo Post. 19 March 2012. Archived from the original on 5 April 2015. Retrieved 5 April 2015. 
  108. ^ Then, Stephen (16 February 2014). "Visitor movement between Brunei, Sarawak to cross over three million mark". The Star (Malaysia). Archived from the original on 5 April 2015. Retrieved 5 April 2015. 
  109. ^ Sibon, Peter (5 March 2012). "Ting identifies key contributing factors to Miri’s boom". The Borneo Post. Archived from the original on 5 April 2015. Retrieved 5 April 2015. 
  110. ^ Then, Stephen (3 February 2014). "Massive congestion at Sarawak-Brunei checkpoints spoils festive mood". The Star (Malaysia). Archived from the original on 9 April 2015. Retrieved 9 April 2015. 
  111. ^ Pail, Salena (4 September 2012). "Pan Borneo Highway, coastal road to be upgraded in stages". The Borneo Post. Archived from the original on 9 September 2012. Retrieved 9 April 2015. 
  112. ^ "Abolish toll at Asean Bridge, gazette Piasau Camp as Hornbill Park, Ling urges". The Borneo Post. 24 May 2013. Archived from the original on 9 April 2015. Retrieved 9 April 2015. 
  113. ^ "Sarawak Bus Travelling …An Exciting Travelling Alternative to Get Around Sarawak, East Malaysia.". sarawak-vacation-destinations. Archived from the original on 23 June 2013. Retrieved 9 April 2015. 
  114. ^ a b "Work to upgrade Miri Airport to commence this year, says Lee". The Borneo Post. 19 February 2014. Archived from the original on 5 March 2014. Retrieved 10 April 2015. 
  115. ^ "Miri Airport needs an upgrade – Jofri Jaraiee". The Malaysian Insider. 23 April 2014. Archived from the original on 19 December 2014. Retrieved 10 April 2015. 
  116. ^ "Mirians can now fly direct to Manila, thanks to AirAsia Zest". The Borneo Post. 9 December 2013. Archived from the original on 13 December 2013. Retrieved 10 April 2015. 
  117. ^ "Miri - getting there". journeymalaysia.com. Archived from the original on 6 April 2015. Retrieved 5 April 2015. 
  118. ^ Richmond, Simon; Harper, Damian (2006). Malaysia, Singapore & Brunei. Ediz. Inglese. Lonely Planet. p. 412. Retrieved 5 April 2015. 
  119. ^ "List of Court addresses - High Court Sarawak (Kuching, Bintulu, Miri & Sibu)". CLJ Legal Network Sdn Bhd. Archived from the original on 28 February 2015. Retrieved 28 February 2015. 
  120. ^ Leong, Chin Kee (12 May 2012). "Chung elevated to High Court judge". The Borneo Post. Archived from the original on 17 April 2015. Retrieved 17 April 2015. 
  121. ^ "Structure of The Court (STRUCTURE OF THE HIGH COURT IN SABAH & SARAWAK)". The High Court in Sabah and Sarawak. Archived from the original on 30 March 2014. Retrieved 10 June 2014. 
  122. ^ "Direktori Mahkamah Syariah Sarawak (Sarawak Syariah Courts Directory)". Official website of e-Syariah (in Malay). Department of Syariah Judiciary Malaysia. Retrieved 28 February 2015. 
  123. ^ "Direktori PDRM Sarawak - Sibu [Sarawak Royal Malaysian Police (RMP) Directory - Sibu]" (in Malay). Royal Malaysian Police. Archived from the original on 29 March 2015. Retrieved 28 February 2015. 
  124. ^ Francis, Mary (11 January 2015). "Miri Central Prison donates clothes for victims of disasters". The Borneo Post. Archived from the original on 17 April 2015. Retrieved 17 April 2015. 
  125. ^ "Latar Belakang Hospital Miri (Miri Hospital Background)" (in Malay). Miri Hospital. Archived from the original on 17 April 2015. Retrieved 17 April 2015. 
  126. ^ Asokan, N; Prathap, P; Ajithkumar, K; Ambooken, B; Binesh, VG; George, S (October 2009). "Pattern of skin diseases among patients attending a tertiary care teaching hospital in Kerala". Indian Journal of Dermatology, Venereology, and Leprology 75 (5): 518. doi:10.4103/0378-6323.55406. PMID 19736440. Retrieved 17 July 2015. These biopsies were taken from the skin clinic, Sarawak General Hospital; visiting skin clinic, Sibu and Miri General Hospital (both secondary centers) and the leprosy health survey team;... 
  127. ^ "Hospital Miri - Obstetrics & Gynaecology Department". Miri General Hospital. Archived from the original on 17 July 2015. Retrieved 17 July 2015. Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology provide its expertise in the field of Obstetrics and Gynaecology . It is also a secondary referral centre for cases of Maternal Health Clinic and Children in the district of Miri, Hospital Lawas, Limbang, Marudi, and Bintulu. 
  128. ^ "Miri polyclinic upgrading its facilities, assures doctor in-charge". The Borneo Post. 1 August 2012. Archived from the original on 17 April 2015. Retrieved 17 April 2015. 
  129. ^ Raphael, Jacqueline (10 November 2011). "Facilities in Tudan Polyclinic not up to standard". The Borneo Post. Archived from the original on 4 January 2015. Retrieved 17 April 2015. 
  130. ^ "About Miri City Medical Centre". Miri City Medical Centre. Retrieved 17 April 2015. 
  131. ^ "Columbia Asia Hospital Miri – Private Hospital and Medical Facilities in Miri, Sarawak, Malaysia". malaysiacentral.com. Archived from the original on 17 April 2015. Retrieved 17 April 2015. 
  132. ^ "Pejabat Pendidikan Daerah Miri (Miri District Education Office)". Sarawak Education Department. Archived from the original on 29 August 2014. Retrieved 28 April 2015. 
  133. ^ "SJKC Chung Hua Miri retains good record in UPSR result". The Borneo Post. 20 November 2012. Archived from the original on 29 April 2015. Retrieved 28 April 2015. 
  134. ^ "Tales of tourism from Chinese writing skill camp for primary school". The Borneo Post. 11 May 2014. Archived from the original on 28 April 2015. Retrieved 28 April 2015. 
  135. ^ "Three cluster schools shine". The Borneo Post. 24 April 2014. Archived from the original on 8 May 2015. Retrieved 8 May 2015. 
  136. ^ Abdullah, Mohammad (11 March 2015). "Four classes at SK Anchi without power". The Borneo Post. Archived from the original on 8 May 2015. Retrieved 8 May 2015. 
  137. ^ Raphael, Jacqueline (28 September 2013). "SK Senadin on right track — Gramong‘". The Borneo Post. Archived from the original on 8 May 2015. Retrieved 8 May 2015. 
  138. ^ "SK St Columba best first aider". The Borneo Post. 30 November 2013. Archived from the original on 20 February 2015. Retrieved 8 May 2015. 
  139. ^ Heng, Eve Sonary (19 April 2015). "World Scout Environment event attracts 244 students". The Borneo Post. Archived from the original on 9 May 2015. Retrieved 9 May 2015. 
  140. ^ "Sekolah Menengah Vokasional Miri". malaysiacentral.com. Archived from the original on 9 May 2015. Retrieved 9 May 2015. 
  141. ^ "砂拉越华文独中通讯录 (Communication directory of Sarawak Chinese independent schools)" (in Chinese). Archived from the original on 31 December 2013. Retrieved 1 March 2015. 
  142. ^ Then, Stephen (11 March 2015). "Global Recognition for Tenby Miri". The Star (Malaysia). Archived from the original on 9 May 2015. Retrieved 9 May 2015. 
  143. ^ "Curtin Sarawak". Curtin University. Archived from the original on 16 March 2015. Retrieved 9 May 2015. 
  144. ^ "Undergraduate Degree Studies". Curtin University Sarawak. Archived from the original on 23 April 2015. Retrieved 9 May 2015. 
  145. ^ "Institut Pendidikan Guru (Teachers' Training Institute)". Archived from the original on 13 November 2014. Retrieved 16 May 2015. 
  146. ^ "I-Systems College students praised". The Borneo Post. 30 October 2011. Archived from the original on 8 January 2014. Retrieved 16 May 2015. 
  147. ^ "Fajar International College offers quality and affordable education". The Borneo Post. 13 April 2011. Archived from the original on 9 May 2015. Retrieved 9 May 2015. 
  148. ^ "IBS College to introduce new courses; next intake April 28". The Borneo Post. 30 January 2014. Archived from the original on 10 May 2015. Retrieved 10 May 2015. 
  149. ^ "Maxcel Institute of Management". blogspot.com. Archived from the original on 16 May 2015. Retrieved 16 May 2015. 
  150. ^ "Ceta welcomes SPM school leavers to sign up for drafting courses". The Borneo Post. 5 September 2012. Archived from the original on 9 May 2015. Retrieved 9 May 2015. 
  151. ^ "Institute Latihan Perindustrian Miri - Introduction". Institute Latihan Perindustrian Miri. Archived from the original on 16 May 2015. Retrieved 16 May 2015. 
  152. ^ "RIAM Institute of Technology Sarawak". etawau.com. Archived from the original on 8 July 2014. Retrieved 16 May 2015. 
  153. ^ "Institut Kemahiran Belia Negara (IKBN), Miri, Sarawak". Naim Holdings Berhad. Archived from the original on 16 May 2015. Retrieved 16 May 2015. 
  154. ^ "Pusat Pembangunan Kemahiran Sarawak (Sarawak Skills Development Centre)". Sarawak Skills Development Centre. Archived from the original on 5 November 2014. Retrieved 16 May 2015. 
  155. ^ "Kolej Komuniti Miri offers short module courses". The Borneo Post. 26 October 2010. Archived from the original on 9 May 2015. Retrieved 9 May 2015. 
  156. ^ "OUM Sarawak". etawau.com. Archived from the original on 26 June 2014. Retrieved 10 May 2015. 
  157. ^ "Introduction to Miri City Council Public Library". LibraryNet. Archived from the original on 3 May 2012. Retrieved 16 May 2015. 
  158. ^ "Introduction to Pustaka Miri". Library Net. Archived from the original on 3 May 2012. Retrieved 16 May 2015. 
  159. ^ "Miri May Fest 2014". sarawakadventures.com. Archived from the original on 16 April 2015. Retrieved 16 April 2015. 
  160. ^ "Miri City MayFest Events Calendar for the Year 2012". MiriResortCity.com. Archived from the original on 6 April 2013. Retrieved 16 April 2015. 
  161. ^ "MCC invites participants for Miri May Fest 2014". The Borneo Post. 11 March 2014. Archived from the original on 16 April 2015. Retrieved 16 April 2015. 
  162. ^ Lai, Cindy (19 January 2014). "Annual Gong Xi Fa Cai Bazaar lends Oriental touch to Miri". The Borneo Post. Archived from the original on 16 April 2015. Retrieved 16 April 2015. 
  163. ^ "Gong Xi Fa Cai Bazaar with 260 stalls comes alive". The Borneo Post. 8 January 2012. Archived from the original on 16 April 2015. Retrieved 16 April 2015. 
  164. ^ "11th International Dance for Humanity committee visits Lai". The Borneo Post. 24 April 2014. Archived from the original on 16 April 2015. Retrieved 16 April 2015. 
  165. ^ "MRCS International Dance For Humanity". Malaysiaan Red Crescent Society. Archived from the original on 16 April 2015. Retrieved 16 April 2015. 
  166. ^ Sman, Cecilia (1 May 2013). "Support MRC’s International Dance for Humanity". The Borneo Post. Archived from the original on 16 April 2015. Retrieved 16 April 2015. 
  167. ^ "916 Malaysia Day Countdown cum Street Party". borneoclours.com. Archived from the original on 16 April 2015. Retrieved 16 April 2015. 
  168. ^ "Miri Anglers Club". Miri Anglers Club. Archived from the original on 16 April 2015. Retrieved 16 April 2015. 
  169. ^ "Miri Deep Sea fishing contest wants ‘early birds’ for logistics". The Borneo Post. 23 February 2015. Archived from the original on 16 April 2015. Retrieved 16 April 2015. 
  170. ^ "Miri City Christmas Parade". Sarawak Tourism Board. Archived from the original on 7 April 2015. Retrieved 16 April 2015. 
  171. ^ "Sea of Mirians in annual Christmas Parade of 15 churches". The Borneo Post. 7 December 2014. Archived from the original on 7 April 2015. Retrieved 16 April 2015. 
  172. ^ "Petroleum Museum Miri". sarawak.attractionsinmalaysia.com. Archived from the original on 3 May 2014. Retrieved 13 April 2015. 
  173. ^ "The Grand Old Lady on Canadian Hill". Tawau. Archived from the original on 16 June 2014. 
  174. ^ "Petroleum Museum". Official Website of Sarawak Museum Department. Archived from the original on 19 August 2014. Retrieved 13 April 2015. 
  175. ^ "Niah Archeology Museum". Sarawak Tourism Board. Archived from the original on 19 August 2014. Retrieved 13 April 2015. 
  176. ^ "Baram Regional Museum". Official Website of Sarawak Museum Department. Archived from the original on 19 August 2014. Retrieved 13 April 2015. 
  177. ^ "Tua Pek Kong Temple". MiriResortCity.com. Archived from the original on 4 April 2015. Retrieved 16 April 2015. 
  178. ^ "Brighton Beach / Tanjung Lobang". Sarawak Tourism Board. Archived from the original on 13 April 2015. Retrieved 13 April 2015. 
  179. ^ "Miri Marina". Pantai Bayau Indah Sdn Bhd. Archived from the original on 1 April 2015. Retrieved 14 April 2015. 
  180. ^ "Hawaii Beach". Sarawak Tourism Board. Archived from the original on 13 April 2015. Retrieved 13 April 2015. 
  181. ^ "Taiwanese paramotor pilots rave about Lutong beach, Miri as a top venue". The Borneo Post. 3 June 2014. Archived from the original on 14 April 2015. Retrieved 14 April 2015. 
  182. ^ "Miri Luak Esplanade". MiriResortCity.com. Archived from the original on 3 November 2014. Retrieved 13 April 2015. 
  183. ^ "Luak Bay Esplanade". Sarawak Tourism Board. Archived from the original on 13 April 2015. Retrieved 13 April 2015. 
  184. ^ "Bungai Beach". Sarawak Tourism Board. Archived from the original on 13 April 2015. Retrieved 13 April 2015. 
  185. ^ Lai, Cindy (30 April 2014). "Residents bemoan sorry state of Bulatan Park". The Borneo Post. Archived from the original on 14 April 2015. Retrieved 14 April 2015. 
  186. ^ "Taman Awam Miri (Miri Public Park)". Sarawak Tourism Board. Archived from the original on 3 April 2015. Retrieved 14 April 2015. 
  187. ^ "Miri City Fan". Sarawak Tourism Board. Archived from the original on 4 February 2015. Retrieved 14 April 2015. 
  188. ^ "Miri City Fan". MiriResortCity.com. Archived from the original on 18 March 2015. Retrieved 14 April 2015. 
  189. ^ "Around and About Miri". gomiri.com. Archived from the original on 10 February 2015. Retrieved 14 April 2015. 
  190. ^ "Taman Bunga (Flower Garden)". kiddy123.com. Archived from the original on 31 March 2015. Retrieved 14 April 2015. 
  191. ^ "The Crocodile Farm". Miri Crocodile Farm. Archived from the original on 13 February 2015. Retrieved 14 April 2015. 
  192. ^ "Miri Crocodile Farm cum Mini Zoo". Sarawak Tourism Board. Archived from the original on 14 April 2015. Retrieved 14 April 2015. 
  193. ^ "Bintang Megamall". Bintang Megamall. Archived from the original on 16 December 2014. Retrieved 14 April 2015. 
  194. ^ "Boulevard Shopping Complex". Boulevard Shopping Complex. Archived from the original on 18 March 2015. Retrieved 14 April 2015. 
  195. ^ "Inside Imperial Mall". miribiz.com. Archived from the original on 15 March 2015. Retrieved 14 April 2015. 
  196. ^ "Welcome to Emart Supermarket". Emart Supermarket. Archived from the original on 19 December 2014. Retrieved 14 April 2015. 
  197. ^ "Inside Merdeka Mall". Merdeka Mall Miri. Archived from the original on 15 March 2015. Retrieved 14 April 2015. 
  198. ^ "Miri Plaza, Miri, Sarawak, Malaysia". exploring-malaysia.com. Archived from the original on 14 April 2015. Retrieved 14 April 2015. 
  199. ^ "Inside MYY Mall". miribiz.com. Archived from the original on 15 March 2015. Retrieved 14 April 2015. 
  200. ^ "Permy Mall". Naim Holdings Berhad. Archived from the original on 26 July 2014. Retrieved 14 April 2015. 
  201. ^ "Inside Soon Hup Tower". miribiz.com. Archived from the original on 15 March 2015. Retrieved 14 April 2015. 
  202. ^ "Wisma Pelita Tunku". MiriResortCity.com. Archived from the original on 18 March 2015. Retrieved 14 April 2015. 
  203. ^ "Permaisuri Imperial City Mall set for soft opening this Friday". The Borneo Post. 14 January 2014. Archived from the original on 11 April 2015. Retrieved 14 April 2015. 
  204. ^ "Sarbekas Weekend Market". MiriResortCity.com. Archived from the original on 18 March 2015. Retrieved 15 April 2015. 
  205. ^ "Saberkas Weekend Market". Lonely Planet. Archived from the original on 15 April 2015. Retrieved 15 April 2015. 
  206. ^ "Handicraft Heritage Centre". attractionsinmalaysia.com. Archived from the original on 7 September 2013. Retrieved 15 April 2015. 
  207. ^ "Miri Handicraft Centre". Sarawak Tourism Board. Archived from the original on 15 April 2015. Retrieved 15 April 2015. 
  208. ^ "Miri Handicraft Centre". Lonely Planet. Archived from the original on 15 April 2015. Retrieved 15 April 2015. 
  209. ^ "GSC Sdn Bhd opens first cinema in Sarawak". The Borneo Post. 8 February 2013. Archived from the original on 4 January 2015. Retrieved 17 April 2015. 
  210. ^ "‘TGV cinemas a catalyst for movie, film hub in Miri’". The Borneo Post. 13 March 2015. Archived from the original on 17 April 2015. Retrieved 17 April 2015. 
  211. ^ a b "Welcome to Online Guide to Miri Entertainment Outlets". sarawak-vacation-destinations. Archived from the original on 24 June 2013. Retrieved 17 April 2015. 
  212. ^ "Wheels Bistro Café". Lonely Planet. Archived from the original on 17 November 2013. Retrieved 17 April 2015. 
  213. ^ "Pelita Commercial Centre". Lonely Planet. Archived from the original on 1 February 2014. Retrieved 17 April 2015. 
  214. ^ "Barcelona". Lonely Planet. 18 April 2015. Archived from the original on 7 November 2013. Retrieved 17 April 2015. 
  215. ^ Sung, Pick (30 December 2009). "Join BARcelona for new year’s eve countdown". The Borneo Post. Archived from the original on 17 April 2015. Retrieved 17 April 2015. 
  216. ^ "Borneo Jazz Festival". tourism.gov.my. Malaysian Tourism Promotion Board. Archived from the original on 14 April 2015. Retrieved 15 April 2015. 
  217. ^ "Borneo Jazz Festival 2015". Sarawak Tourism Board. Archived from the original on 12 April 2015. Retrieved 15 April 2015. 
  218. ^ "Borneo Jazz Programme 2015". Sarawak Tourism Board. Archived from the original on 15 February 2015. Retrieved 15 April 2015. 
  219. ^ "About Asia Music Festival". Asia Music Festival. Archived from the original on 2 February 2015. Retrieved 15 April 2015. 
  220. ^ "Asia Music Festival 2014 to attract more than 4,000 music lovers". Malaysia Travel News. 17 September 2014. Archived from the original on 15 April 2015. Retrieved 15 April 2015. 
  221. ^ "Miri Country Music Festival 2016". Sarawak Tourism Board. Archived from the original on 15 April 2015. Retrieved 15 April 2015. 
  222. ^ "Miri Country Music Fest on Feb 7". The Borneo Post. 29 January 2015. Archived from the original on 15 April 2015. Retrieved 15 April 2015. 
  223. ^ "Eating Out" (PDF). Curtin University Sarawak. Archived from the original (PDF) on 15 April 2015. Retrieved 15 April 2015. 
  224. ^ a b "Miri Central Market". Lonely Planet. Archived from the original on 23 November 2013. Retrieved 14 April 2015. 
  225. ^ "Miri Curry Rice". mirifoodhunt.com. Archived from the original on 20 December 2014. Retrieved 15 April 2015. 
  226. ^ "Great Kolo Mee - Review of Central Market". tripadvisor. Archived from the original on 6 April 2015. Retrieved 15 April 2015. 
  227. ^ "Char Kueh Tiaw at Open Air Market Miri". miricitysharing.com. Archived from the original on 14 October 2012. Retrieved 15 April 2015. 
  228. ^ Yi, Chang (18 May 2014). "Miri boasts exotic native cuisine". The Borneo Post. Archived from the original on 19 May 2014. Retrieved 15 April 2015. 
  229. ^ "Where to Eat in Miri?". gomiri.com. Archived from the original on 30 July 2013. Retrieved 15 April 2015. 
  230. ^ Rose, Diana (26 September 2010). "Best of Bario in Miri city". The Star (Malaysia). Archived from the original on 14 April 2015. Retrieved 15 April 2015. 
  231. ^ "2020cafe". makanmaniacs.com. Archived from the original on 9 October 2008. Retrieved 15 April 2015. 
  232. ^ "The Book of Zee Avi". tumblr.com. Archived from the original on 14 October 2012. Retrieved 16 May 2015. 
  233. ^ "Maloney: I play for Scotland but Malaysia will always be a special part of me". FourFourTwo.com. Archived from the original on 30 October 2014. Retrieved 16 May 2015. 
  234. ^ Syam, M.F (2012). In Domination and Contestation: Muslim Bumiputera Politics in Sarawak. Institute of Southeast Asian Studies. p. 114-120. ISBN 978-981-4311-58-8. Google Book Search. Retrieved 23 June 2014.
  235. ^ "Joseph Kalang Tie returns to Sarawak". The Borneo Post. 22 September 2012. Archived from the original on 16 May 2015. Retrieved 16 May 2015. The Miri lad who has completed his loan period is however willing to pull on Terengganu colours again... 
  236. ^ Tan, Joceline (5 June 2013). "By George! It’s a tough battle". The Star (Malaysia). Archived from the original on 16 May 2015. Retrieved 16 May 2015. 
  237. ^ Sman, Cecilia (9 December 2012). "Von Jolly Riding High". The Borneo Post. Archived from the original on 16 May 2015. Retrieved 16 May 2015. 
  238. ^ Say, Clarissa; Lee, Samuel; Backus, RJ (26 March 2014). "Malaysia's hottest athletes: Vote for your favourite sexy sportswoman". The Star (Malaysia). Archived from the original on 30 March 2014. Retrieved 16 May 2015. Those who make fun of female drivers have never seen Miri-born Natasha put the pedal to the metal. 
  239. ^ "Vijay Singh". iseekgolf.com. Archived from the original on 6 April 2012. Retrieved 16 May 2015. Singh then took a job at the Keningau Club in Sabah, Malaysia, before his move to the Miri Golf Club in Sarawak. 
  240. ^ a b "Honorary Consulates in Malaysia" (PDF). European External Action Service. Retrieved 2 July 2015. 
  241. ^ "肇庆市广宁县与马来西亚美里市缔结友好城市 (Guangning County of Zhaoqing city built a sister-city relationship with Malaysian city of Miri)" (in Chinese). 广东省归国华侨联合会 (Guangdong province Returned Overseas Chinese Association). 2 December 2012. Archived from the original on 21 March 2015. Retrieved 21 March 2015. 
  242. ^ "Hualien county and City of Miri, Malaysia becoming sisters cities". Hualien County Government. Archived from the original on 24 July 2015. Retrieved 24 July 2015. 
  243. ^ 游, 清海 (23 June 2015). "花蓮縣與馬來西亞砂拉越州美里市締結友好城市 (Hualien County built a sister city relationship with Malaysian city of Miri, Sarawak)" (in Chinese). 指傳媒 (Fingermedia). Archived from the original on 19 July 2015. Retrieved 19 July 2015. 

External links[edit]