Miss Teenage America

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Miss Teenage America
Formation1961
TypeBeauty pageant (1961-79); Magazine contest (1981-end)
Location
Official language
English
AffiliationsDr Pepper (-1981);
Teen (magazine) (1981-end)

The Miss Teenage America Pageant was a United States beauty pageant started in 1961 as a pageant for high school girls. In the 1960s and 1970s, it was usually broadcast on the CBS network around November each year.[1] The pageant was sponsored by Dr. Pepper. The original pageant ended after 1979, and the name rights were sold to Teen Magazine.

History[edit]

From 1961–1967 Dallas, Texas hosted the national pageant, and it moved to Fort Worth, Texas from 1968–1973. Afterwards, different cities throughout the United States hosted the national pageant.

Unlike today's Miss Teen USA and Miss America's Outstanding Teen, the pageant featured girls representing cities and not states. The contestants aged between 13 and 17. There was also a talent segment. The organizers experimented with the finalist formats until 1967, when it was fixed at eight finalists and then the top four. Finalists were always announced the night before the finals. Winners received a four-year college scholarship, a car from Chrysler or Dodge, cash, a personal appearance contract, as well as Dr. Pepper and American Airline stock.

A 1976 book attributed to Bob Hope, Erma Bombeck and Judith Houghton was titled "Miss Teenage America Tells How to Make Good Things Happen." The proceeds went into a scholarship fund for contestants. The organization also printed and sold punch out paper doll sets featuring the reigning queen.

Hosts over the years included Sally Field, Johnny Carson, Betty White, Allen Ludden, Bob Barker, and Dick Clark. In 1975, NBC broadcast it. Bob Hope hosted in 1976. Other notable hosts include Bud Collyer and John Davidson, and Richard Thomas. On February 15, 1979 the event was held at the Grand Ole Opry House in Nashville, Tennessee with Anson Williams hosting.

The pageant organization began to disintegrate in 1979.[2] Instead of being televised nationally on a single network, the 1979 show was sold through syndication, playing on 64 different stations on 13 different nights, leaving little suspense as to who was going to win. Dr. Pepper suspended local contests in the hopes of getting a new national network deal, which did not occur.[3]

Dr. Pepper sold the pageant rights to Teen Magazine in 1981, who completely transformed the event into a mail-in contest which evaluated grades and volunteer work.[4] Meanwhile, the Miss Teen USA pageant was essentially a TV replacement for Miss Teenage America, and first held in 1983.

Original pageant[edit]

  • Miss Teenage America 1962 - Diane Lynne Cox (Richmond, VA)[5]
  • Miss Teenage America 1963 - Darla Banks (Fresno, CA)[6]
  • Miss Teenage America 1964 - Judy Doll (Akron, OH)*[7]
  • Miss Teenage America 1965 - Carolyn Mignini (Baltimore, MD)[8]
  • Miss Teenage America 1966 - Colette Daiute (New York City, NY)[9]
  • Miss Teenage America 1967 - Sandy Roberts (Milpitas, CA)[10]
  • Miss Teenage America 1968 - Stephanie Ann Crane (St. Louis, MO)[11]
  • Miss Teenage America 1969 - Melissa Babish (Pittsburgh, PA)[12][13]
  • Miss Teenage America 1970 - Debbie Patton (Odessa, TX)[14]
  • Miss Teenage America 1971 - Rewa Walsh (Magnolia High School, Anaheim, CA)[15]
  • Miss Teenage America 1972 - Mary Colleen Fitzpatrick (Lancaster High School, Lancaster, OH)[16]
  • Miss Teenage America 1973 - Melissa Marie Galbraith
  • Miss Teenage America 1974 - Lori Matsukawa (Honolulu, HI)[17]
  • Miss Teenage America 1975 - Karen Peterson (Toledo, OH)[18]
  • Miss Teenage America 1976 - Cathy Durden (Honolulu, HI)[19]
  • Miss Teenage America 1977 - Becky Reid (Dallas, TX)[20]
  • Miss Teenage America 1978 - Leslie Griffiths (Anchorage, AK)[21]
  • Miss Teenage America 1979 - Lori Heeren (Sioux City, IA)[22][2]

Teen Magazine[edit]

  • Miss Teenage America 1983 - Amy Sue Brenkacz (Chicago, IL)[23]
  • Miss Teenage America 1984 - Laura Baxter (Danville, CA)[24]
  • Miss Teenage America 1985 - Janice Payne (Charleston, SC)[25]
  • Miss Teenage America 1986 - Lisa Morgan (Chicago, IL) (later was Miss Illinois USA 1991).[26][27][28]
  • Miss Teenage America 1987 - Karen Johanson (Palo Alto, CA)[29]
  • Miss Teenage America 1988 - Diane Dovell (Columbus, OH) [30]
  • Miss Teenage America 1990 - Jennifer Kissick (Carlsbad, CA)[31]
  • Miss Teenage America 1991 - Elizabeth Nuckles (Fletchers Ridge, VA)[32]
  • Miss Teenage America 1992 - Samantha Zogg (San Diego, CA)[32][33]
  • Miss Teenage America 1993 - Mary Nguyen (Fullerton, CA)[34]
  • Miss Teenage America 1994 - Elizabeth Andre (Ames, Iowa)[35]
  • Miss Teenage America 1996 - Katie Beam (Broken Arrow, Oklahoma)[36][37][38]
  • Miss Teenage America 1997 - Brooke Allen (Wichita, KS) [39][40]
  • Miss Teenage America 1998 - Megan Weber (Zanesville, OH)[41][42]

Miss Teenage America 1964, Judy Doll, gave up her crown on May 19, 1964, to get married on May 31, 1964, to George Wolfe, a junior at Central Michigan University. The first runner-up, Jeanine Zavrel of Washington, DC, was awarded the title.[43]

Former contestants[edit]

Constance Ramos, (ABC's Extreme Makeover: Home Edition Building and Planning Designer, Host of HGTV's Color Correction,) Miss Teenage Kansas City, 1979

References[edit]

  1. ^ Terrace, Vincent. Television Specials, p. 259 (2013)
  2. ^ a b Hayworth, Bret (29 May 2004). Former Akron woman recalls being final Miss Teenage America, Sioux City Journal
  3. ^ (6 July 1980). Beauty pageant future uncertain, Huron Daily Plainsman (Associated Press)
  4. ^ Bitch magazine ("1981: 'Teen magazine purchases the Miss Teenage America Pageant and turns it into a mail-in contest based on grades and volunteer work.")
  5. ^ Diane Lynne Cox Archived 2012-10-09 at the Wayback Machine.
  6. ^ Darla Banks Archived 2012-10-09 at the Wayback Machine.
  7. ^ Judy Doll Archived 2012-10-09 at the Wayback Machine.
  8. ^ Carolyn Mignini Archived 2012-10-09 at the Wayback Machine.
  9. ^ Colette Daiute Archived 2012-10-09 at the Wayback Machine.
  10. ^ Sandy Roberts Archived 2012-10-09 at the Wayback Machine.
  11. ^ Stephanie Ann Crane Archived 2012-10-09 at the Wayback Machine.
  12. ^ Sports Illustrated Magazine vault
  13. ^ Melissa Babish Archived 2012-10-09 at the Wayback Machine.
  14. ^ Debbie Patton Archived 2012-10-09 at the Wayback Machine.
  15. ^ Rewa Walsh Archived 2012-10-09 at the Wayback Machine.
  16. ^ Mary Colleen Fitzpatrick Archived 2012-10-09 at the Wayback Machine.
  17. ^ Lori Matsukawa Archived 2012-10-09 at the Wayback Machine.
  18. ^ Karen Peterson Archived 2012-10-09 at the Wayback Machine.
  19. ^ Cathy Durden Archived 2012-10-09 at the Wayback Machine.
  20. ^ Becky Reid Archived 2012-10-09 at the Wayback Machine.
  21. ^ Leslie Griffiths Archived 2012-10-09 at the Wayback Machine.
  22. ^ Lori Heeren Archived 2012-10-09 at the Wayback Machine.
  23. ^ Hanauer, Joan (23 April 1983). Miss Teen America, UPI
  24. ^ (15 January 1984). Laura Baxter, a 17-year-old cheerleader who wants a career, UPI
  25. ^ (9 December 1984). Princess of Flowers runner-up in Miss Teen-Age America, Index-Journal
  26. ^ Zorn, Erc (12 February 1986). Miss Teen America Is All Smiles Even When Boredom Snowballs, Chicago Tribune
  27. ^ Hoekstra, Dave (6 March 1986). Palatine teen bops to title, Chicago Sun-Times
  28. ^ Purdom, Candace (21 April 1991). C-h-e-e-r-s, Chicago Tribune
  29. ^ (27 February 1987). Miss Teenage America for 1988 being sought, Monessen Valley Independent
  30. ^ (27 January 1988). Miss Teenage America Content Accents Skills, Scholarship, The Tribune
  31. ^ (8 November 1989). California Teen-ager Chosen Miss Teenage America, Associated Press
  32. ^ a b "Santa Cruz Sentinel from Santa Cruz, California · Page 4". Newspapers.com. Retrieved 2016-08-09.
  33. ^ California girl, Teen (1992)
  34. ^ Le Phuong (21 February 1993). Teen Pageant Winner Is as Asian-American as Apple Pie, Los Angeles Times
  35. ^ [1]
  36. ^ (29 March 1996). Oklahoma 17-Year-Old Picked 35th Miss Teenage America, Associated Press
  37. ^ Beyette, Beverly (15 April 1996). Teenage Wisdom, Los Angeles Times
  38. ^ Higgins, Stephanie (3 November 1999). BEAMing with joy, Tulsa World
  39. ^ (7 April 1997). Good Girls' Do, New York Magazine
  40. ^ (26 March 1997). Kansas student is Miss Teenage America, Salina Journal
  41. ^ "National Order of the Arrow Conference". Retrieved 13 September 2014.
  42. ^ Smith, Liz (19 Mach 1998). Peopletalk, Philadelphia Inquirer
  43. ^ Judy Doll Archived 2012-10-09 at the Wayback Machine.
  44. ^ "Cybill Sheperd bio". Retrieved 13 September 2014.
  45. ^ Cybill Shepard, Miss Congeniality 1966 Archived 2012-10-09 at the Wayback Machine.
  46. ^ "Miss Teenage Santa Rosa". Archived from the original on 25 January 2013. Retrieved 13 September 2014.
  47. ^ TV.com. "Karen Valentine bio". TV.com. Retrieved 13 September 2014.
  48. ^ "Taylor Marsh bio". Taylor Marsh. Retrieved 13 September 2014.

It is very likely that Traci Reed, Miss Teenage Los Angeles was the first African American to compete in a nationally televised beauty pageant in fall of 1966, She was also one of the seven finalists and later had a starring role in one of the first TV sitcom about a black couple. Donna Taylor Gann, Miss Teenage Lexington, Ky. 1966.