Miss World 1973

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Miss World 1973
Date 23 November 1973
Presenters Michael Aspel, David Vine
Venue Royal Albert Hall, London, UK
Broadcaster BBC
Entrants 54
Debuts Sri Lanka
Withdrawals Costa Rica, Ecuador, Germany, India, Liberia, Paraguay
Returns Colombia, Cyprus, Korea, Lebanon, Luxembourg, Peru
Winner Marjorie Wallace
 United States
(dethroned)
Evangeline Pascual
 Philippines (successor)[1][2] [3]
← 1972
1974 →

Miss World 1973, the 23rd edition of the Miss World pageant, was held on 23 November 1973 at the Royal Albert Hall in London, UK. 54 delegates vied for the crown won by Marjorie Wallace of United States.[1] She was crowned by Belinda Green of Australia. Wallace won $7,200 in prize money for the first-place result.[4]

Results[edit]

Countries and territories which sent delegates and results for Miss World 1973[5][6]

Placements[edit]

Final results Contestant
Miss World 1973
1st runner-up
2nd runner-up
3rd runner-up
  •  Israel – Chaja Katzir[5]
4th runner-up
  •  South Africa – Shelley Latham[5]
5th runner-up
  •  Dominican Republic – Clariza Duarte Garrido
6th runner-up
  •  United Kingdom – Veronica Ann Cross
Semi-finalists
  •  Africa South – Ellen Peters
  •  Brazil – Florence Gambogi Alvarenga
  •  Greece – Katerina Papadimitriou
  •  HollandAnna Maria Groot
  •  Italy – Marva Bartolucci
  •  Lebanon – Sylva Ohannessian
  •  New Zealand – Pamela King
  •  Seychelles – June Gouthier

Contestants[edit]

  •  Africa South – Ellen Peters
  •  Argentina – Beatriz Callejón †
  •  Aruba – Edwina Diaz
  •  Australia – Virginia Radinas
  •  Austria – Roswitha Kobald
  •  Bahamas – Deborah Louise Isaacs
  •  Belgium – Christine Devisch
  •  Bermuda – Judy Joy Richards
  •  Botswana – Priscilla Molefe
  •  Brazil – Florence Gambogi Alvarenga
  •  Canada – Deborah Anne Ducharme
  •  Colombia – Elsa María Springtube Ramírez
  •  Cyprus – Demetra Heraklidou
  •  Dominican Republic – Clariza Duarte Garrido
  •  Finland – Seija Mäkinen
  •  France – Isabelle Nadia Krumacker
  •  Gibraltar – Josephine Rodríguez
  •  Greece – Katerina Papadimitriou
  •  Guam – Shirley Ann Brennan
  •  HollandAnna Maria Groot
  •  Honduras – Belinda Handal
  •  Hong Kong – Judy Yung Chu-Dic
  •  Iceland – Nína Breiðfjörd
  •  Ireland – Yvonne Costelloe
  •  Israel – Chaja Katzir
  •  Italy – Marva Bartolucci
  •  JamaicaPatsy Yuen
  •  Japan – Keiko Matsunaga
  •  Korea – An Soon-young
  •  Lebanon – Sylva Ohannessian
  •  Luxembourg – Giselle Anita Nicole Azzeri
  •  Malaysia – Narimah Mohd Yusoff
  •  Malta – Carmen Farrugia
  •  Mauritius – Daisy Ombrasine
  •  Mexico – Roxana Villares Moreno
  •  New Zealand – Pamela King
  •  Norway – Wenche Steen
  •  Peru – Mary Núñez
  •  PhilippinesEvangeline Luis Pascual
  •  Portugal – Maria Helene Pereira Martins
  •  Puerto Rico – Milagros García
  •  Seychelles – June Gouthier
  •  Singapore – Debra Josephine de Souza
  •  South Africa – Shelley Latham
  •  Spain – Mariona Russell
  •  Sri LankaShiranthi Wickremesinghe
  •  Sweden – Mercy Nilsson
  •   Switzerland – Magda Lepori
  •  Thailand – Pornpit Sakornujiara
  •  Turkey – Beyhan Kiral
  •  United Kingdom – Veronica Ann Cross
  •  United StatesMarjorie Wallace[1][5][3]
  •  Venezuela – Edicta de los Ángeles García Oporto
  •  Yugoslavia – Atina Golubova

Notes[edit]

Returns[edit]

  • Last competed in 1968:
    •  Peru
  • Last competed in 1970:
    •  Colombia
    •  Lebanon
  • Last competed in 1971:
    •  Cyprus
    •  Korea
    •  Luxembourg
    •  Sri Lanka (as  Ceylon)

Other notes[edit]

Marjorie Wallace became the first Miss United States to be crowned Miss World. The United States' representative had previously finished as first runner-up on five occasions, in 1954, 1955, 1956, 1965, and 1969. Wallace would also become the first winner not to complete her reign when she was fired[1] in March 1974, because she had "failed to fulfill the basic requirements of the job". She was never officially replaced by any of her runners-up.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Pelling, Rowan (July 13, 2015). "What's so wrong about being a beauty queen?". The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved January 23, 2016. 
  2. ^ a b "The Southeast Missourian". Retrieved 26 January 2016. 
  3. ^ a b c The Pittsburgh Press
  4. ^ "Daytona Beach Morning Journal". Retrieved 26 January 2016. 
  5. ^ a b c d e f g "Beaver County Times". Retrieved 26 January 2016. 
  6. ^ "Herald-Journal". Retrieved 26 January 2016. 
  7. ^ "Eight beauty queens who met with controversy". The Telegraph. Retrieved 29 April 2014. 

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]