Missing You (Red Sovine song)

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"Missing You"
Single by Webb Pierce
A-side"Bye Bye Love"
Released1957
FormatVinyl, 7", 45 RPM
GenreCountry[1]
Length2:12
LabelDecca
Songwriter(s)Dale Noe & Red Sovine
"Missing You"
Single by Ray Peterson
A-side"You Thrill Me"[2]
Released1961
FormatVinyl, 7", 45 RPM
GenreTraditional pop
Length2:45
LabelDunes
Songwriter(s)Dale Noe & Red Sovine

"Missing You" is a song written by Red Sovine and Dale Noe,[3] which was originally released by Red Sovine in 1955, and was later a hit single for Webb Pierce in 1957, Ray Peterson in 1961, and was posthumously a hit for Jim Reeves in 1972. Sovine's version was the B-side of Red Sovine and Webb Pierce's hit single "Why Baby Why".[4][5]

Webb Pierce version[edit]

In 1957, Webb Pierce released a version of the song, as the B-side of "Bye Bye Love".[1] Pierce's version reached No. 7 on Billboard's chart of "Most Played C&W by Jockeys",[6] while reaching No. 8 on Billboard's chart of "C&W Best Selling in Stores", in a tandem ranking with its A-side, "Bye Bye Love".[7]

Ray Peterson version[edit]

In 1961, Ray Peterson released a version of the song as a single. Peterson's version spent 15 weeks on the Billboard Hot 100 chart peaking at No. 29,[8] while reaching No. 7 on Billboard's Easy Listening chart,[9] and No. 6 on Canada's CHUM Hit Parade.[10] Peterson's version of "Missing You" was ranked No. 90 on Billboard's end of year "Hot 100 for 1961 - Top Sides of the Year".[11]

Jim Reeves version[edit]

Jim Reeves recorded "Missing You" in his last recording session on July 2, 1964.[12] In 1968, Reeves's version was released posthumously on his album A Touch of Sadness.[13] In 1972, Reeves's version of the song was released as the lead track on his album Missing You and as a single. The single spent 16 weeks on Billboard's Hot Country Singles chart, reaching No. 8,[14][15] while reaching No. 13 on Canada's RPM's "The Programmers Country Playlist".[16] The album, Missing You, reached No. 9 on Billboard's "Hot Country LP's" chart.[17][18]

Other versions[edit]

In 1965, Australian singer Tony Worsley released a version of the song, which reached No. 8 in Australia.[19]

In 1968, Mel Tillis released a version of the song on his album Let Me Talk to You.[20]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Review Spotlight on... C&W Records", Billboard, May 6, 1957. p. 66. Retrieved February 16, 2018.
  2. ^ "Reviews of This Week's Singles", Billboard, May 29, 1961. p. 27. Retrieved February 16, 2018.
  3. ^ Lonergan, David F. (2005). Hit Records, 1950-1975, Scarecrow Press. p. 148. Retrieved February 16, 2018.
  4. ^ "Country & Western Records - Best Sellers In Stores", Billboard, December 25, 1961. p. 10. Retrieved February 15, 2018.
  5. ^ Neely, Tim; Popoff, Martin (2009). Goldmine Price Guide to 45 RPM Records, Krause Publications. p. 632. Retrieved February 15, 2018.
  6. ^ Most Played C&W by Jockeys", Billboard, August 5, 1957. p. 56. Retrieved February 16, 2018.
  7. ^ C&W Best Selling in Stores", Billboard, June 10, 1957. p. 58. Retrieved February 16, 2018.
  8. ^ Hot 100 - Ray Peterson Missing You Chart History, Billboard.com. Retrieved February 15, 2018.
  9. ^ Adult Contemporary - Ray Peterson Missing You Chart History, Billboard.com. Retrieved February 15, 2018.
  10. ^ "1050 CHUM - CHUM Charts: Chart No. 230". CHUM. September 4, 1961. Archived from the original on July 21, 2006. Retrieved February 16, 2018.
  11. ^ "Chart Toppers", Billboard, December 25, 1961. p. 10. Retrieved February 15, 2018.
  12. ^ Jim Reeves Missing You Ad, jim-reeves.com. Retrieved February 16, 2018.
  13. ^ "A Touch of Sadness - Jim Reeves". AllMusic. Retrieved February 16, 2018.
  14. ^ Hot Country Songs - Jim Reeves Missing You Chart History, Billboard.com. Retrieved February 16, 2018.
  15. ^ "Hot Country Singles", Billboard, October 14, 1972. p. 60. Retrieved February 16, 2018.
  16. ^ "The Programmers Country Playlist", RPM Weekly, Volume 18, No. 7, September 30, 1972. Retrieved February 16, 2018.
  17. ^ Top Country Albums - Jim Reeves Missing You Chart History, Billboard.com. Retrieved February 16, 2018.
  18. ^ "Hot Country LP's", Billboard, November 4, 1972. p. 51. Retrieved February 16, 2018.
  19. ^ "Hits of the World", Billboard, January 22, 1966. p. 32. Retrieved February 16, 2018.
  20. ^ "Let Me Talk to You - Mel Tillis". AllMusic. Retrieved February 16, 2018.