Mississippi House of Representatives

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Mississippi House of Representatives
Mississippi State Legislature
Coat of arms or logo
Type
Type
Term limits
None
History
New session started
January 7, 2020
Leadership
Speaker
Philip Gunn (R)
since January 3, 2012
Speaker pro Tempore
Jason White (R)
since January 7, 2020
Minority Leader
Structure
Seats122
File MS House.svg
Political groups
  •   Republican (74)
  •   Democratic (45)
  •   Independent (2)
Length of term
4 years
AuthorityArticle IV, Mississippi Constitution
Salary$10,000/year + per diem
Elections
Last election
November 5, 2019
(122 seats)
Next election
November 7, 2023
(122 seats)
RedistrictingLegislative Control
Meeting place
Mississippi State Capitol building in Jackson.jpg
House of Representatives Chamber
Mississippi State Capitol
Jackson, Mississippi
Website
Mississippi State Legislature

The Mississippi House of Representatives is the lower house of the Mississippi Legislature, the lawmaking body of the U.S. state of Mississippi. According to the state constitution of 1890, it is to comprise no more than 122 members elected for four-year terms. To qualify as a member of the House candidates must be at least 21 years old, a resident of Mississippi for at least four years, and a resident in the district in which he or she is running for at least two years. Elections are held the first Tuesday after the first Monday in November.

Powers and process[edit]

Article 4, Section 36 of the Mississippi Constitution specifies that the state legislature must meet for 125 days every four years and 90 days in other years. The Mississippi House of Representatives has the authority to determine rules of its own proceedings, punish its members for disorderly behavior, and expel a member with a two-thirds vote of its membership.[1] Bills must undergo three readings in each house, unless two-thirds of the house dispenses with the rules.[1] They cannot be amended to a new purpose.[1] Amendments to bills must be approved by both houses.[1]

The governor has the power to veto legislation, but legislators can override the veto with a two-thirds decision.[1]

From 1890 to 2020, State representatives were authorized under the Mississippi Constitution to elect the Governor of Mississippi if no candidate had received 62 of the 122 electoral votes (one per district) and more than 50% of the popular vote. This occurred only once, in 1999, when Ronnie Musgrove had the most votes statewide, but was one electoral vote and 2936 votes (0.38%) shy of a majority: Musgrove was elected on the first ballot.

Salary[edit]

State representatives earn $10,000 per year.[2]

Composition[edit]

The following composition reflects the balance of power after the 2019 elections, which was the third election since Reconstruction to give a majority of seats in the State House to the Republicans.[3] State representatives are elected every four years by the qualified electors of the district for which they are running.[4] Candidates are required to be at least 21 years of age and a resident of the state and district for which they are campaigning.[5]

Affiliation Party
(Shading indicates majority caucus)
Total
Democratic Republican Independent Vacant
End of previous legislature (2019) 44 74 2 120 2
Begin 46 75 1 122 0
January 7, 2020[6] 44 75 3 122 0
Latest voting share 36.1% 61.5% 2.5%

Current members[edit]

District Representative Party Assumed Office Residence Notes
1 Lester Carpenter Republican 2008 Burnsville
2 Nick Bain Republican 2012 Corinth
3 William Tracy Arnold Republican 2012 Booneville
4 Jody Steverson Republican 2012 Ripley
5 John Faulkner Democratic 2014 Holly Springs
6 Dana Criswell Republican 2016 Olive Branch
7 Steve Hopkins Republican 2016 Southaven
8 Trey Lamar Republican 2012 Senatobia
9 Cedric Burnett Democratic 2016 Tunica
10 Brady Williamson Republican 2020 Oxford
11 Lataisha Jackson Democratic 2013 Como
12 Clay Deweese Republican 2020 Oxford
13 Steve Massengill Republican 2012 Hickory Flat
14 Sam Creekmore IV Republican 2020 New Albany
15 Mac Huddleston Republican 2008 Pontotoc
16 Rickey W. Thompson Democratic 2020 Shannon
17 Shane Aguirre Republican 2016 Tupelo
18 Jerry Turner Republican 2004 Baldwyn
19 Randy Boyd Republican 2012 Mantachie
20 Chris Brown Republican 2012 Nettleton
21 Donnie Bell Republican 2008 Fulton
22 Jon Ray Lancaster Democratic 2020 Houston
23 Charles Beckett Republican 2004 Bruce
24 Jeff Hale Republican 2016 Nesbit
25 Dan Eubanks Republican 2016 Walls
26 Orlando Paden Democratic 2016 Clarksdale
27 Kenneth Walker Democratic 2016 Carthage
28 Jerry Darnell Republican 2020 Hernando
29 Abe M. Hudson Jr. Democratic 2016 Shelby
30 Tracey Rosebud Democratic 2016 Tutwiler
31 Otis Anthony Democratic 2018 Indianola
32 Solomon Osborne Democratic 2019 Greenwood
33 Thomas Reynolds II Democratic 1980 Charleston
34 Kevin Horan Independent 2012 Grenada
35 Joey Hood Republican 2012 Ackerman
36 Karl Gibbs Democratic 2013 West Point
37 Lynn Wright Republican 2020 Columbus
38 Cheikh Taylor Democratic 2017 Starkville
39 Dana McLean Republican 2020 Columbus
40 Hester Jackson-McCray Democratic 2020 Horn Lake
41 Kabir Karriem Democratic 2016 Columbus
42 Carl Mickens Democratic 2016 Brooksville
43 Rob Roberson Republican 2016 Starkville
44 C. Scott Bounds Republican 2004 Philadelphia
45 Michael Evans Independent 2012 Monticello
46 Karl Oliver Republican 2016 Winona
47 Bryant Clark Democratic 2004 PIckens
48 Jason White Republican 2012 West Speaker pro tempore since 2020
49 Willie Bailey Democratic 1995 Greenville
50 John Hines Democratic 2001 Greenville
51 Rufus Straughter Democratic 1996 Belzoni
52 Bill Kinkade Republican 2013 Byhalia
53 Vince Mangold Republican 2016 Brookhaven
54 Kevin Ford Republican 2017 Vicksburg
55 Oscar Denton Democratic 2013 Vicksburg
56 Philip Gunn Republican 2004 Clinton Speaker of the House since 2012
57 Edward Blackmon Jr. Democratic 1984 Canton
58 Joel Bomgar Republican 2016 Madison
59 Brent Powell Republican 2013 Brandon
60 Fred Shanks Republican 2018 Brandon
61 Gene Newman Republican 2020 Pearl
62 Thomas Weathersby Sr. Republican 1992 Florence
63 Stephanie Foster Democratic 2020 Jackson
64 Shanda Yates Democratic 2020 Jackson
65 Chris Bell Democratic 2016 Jackson
66 De'Keither Stamps Democratic 2020 Jackson
67 Earle S. Banks Democratic 1993 Jackson
68 Zakiya Summers Democratic 2020 Jackson
69 Alyce Clarke Democratic 1985 Jackson
70 Bo Brown Democratic 2020 Jackson
71 Ronnie Crudup Jr. Democratic 2019 Jackson
72 Debra Gibbs Democratic 2016 West Point
73 Jill Ford Republican 2020 Madison
74 Lee Yancey Republican 2020 Brandon
75 Tom Miles Democratic 2012 Forest
76 Gregory Holloway Sr. Democratic 2000 Hazlehurst
77 Price Wallace Republican 2018 Mendenhall
78 Randy Rushing Republican 2012 Decatur
79 Mark Tullos Republican 2016 Raleigh
80 Omeria Scott Democratic 1993 Laurel
81 Stephen Horne Republican 2004 Meridian
82 Charles Young Democratic 2012 Meridian
83 Billy Adam Calvert Republican 2020 Meridian
84 Troy Smith Republican 2020 Enterprise
85 Jeffery Harness Democratic 2018 Fayette
86 Shane Barnett Republican 2016 Waynesboro
87 Joseph Tubb Republican 2020 Purvis
88 Robin Robinson Republican 2020 Laurel
89 Donnie Scoggin Republican 2017 Ellisville
90 Noah Sanford Republican 2017 Collins
91 Bob Evans Democratic 2008 Monticello
92 Becky Currie Republican 2008 Brookhaven
93 Timmy Ladner Republican 2012 Poplarville
94 Robert Johnson III Democratic 2004 Natchez Minority leader
95 Jay McKnight Republican 2020 Gulfport
96 Angela Cockerham Independent 2005 Magnolia
97 Sam Mims V Republican 2004 McComb
98 Daryl Porter Jr. Democratic 2020 Summit
99 Bill Pigott Republican 2008 Tylertown
100 Ken Morgan Republican 2007 Morgantown
101 Kent McCarty Republican 2019 Hattiesburg
102 Missy McGee Republican 2017 Hattiesburg
103 Percy Watson Democratic 1980 Hattiesburg
104 Larry Byrd Republican 2008 Petal
105 Dale Goodin Republican 2020 Richton
106 Jansen Owen Republican 2020 Poplarville
107 Doug McLeod Republican 2012 Lucedale
108 Stacey Hobgood-Wilkes Republican 2017 PIcayune
109 Manly Barton Republican 2012 Moss Point
110 Jeramey Anderson Democratic 2013 Escatawpa
111 Charles Busby Republican 2012 Pascagoula
112 John Read Republican 1994 Gautier
113 Henry Zuber III Republican 2000 Ocean Springs
114 Jeffrey S. Guice Republican 2008 Ocean Springs
115 Randall Patterson Republican 2004 Biloxi
116 Casey Eure Republican 2011 Saucier
117 Kevin Felsher Republican 2020 Bilxoi
118 Greg Haney Republican 2012 Gulfport
119 Sonya Williams-Barnes Democratic 2012 Gulfport
120 Richard Bennett Republican 2008 Long Beach
121 Carolyn Crawford Republican 2012 Pass Christian
122 Brent Anderson Republican 2020 St. Louis

Past composition of the House of Representatives[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Constitutional Provisions The Legislature And Legislation Rules of Procedure, Mississippi Legislature (accessed May 31, 2013)
  2. ^ Legislative Salaries by State, Empirecenter.org (accessed May 31, 2013)
  3. ^ "GOP takes Miss. House for 1st time in years". Boston.Com. November 14, 2011.
  4. ^ Article 4, Section 34, Oklahoma Constitution (accessed May 31, 2013)
  5. ^ Article 4, Section 41 Archived June 23, 2012, at the Wayback Machine, Oklahoma Constitution (accessed May 31, 2013)
  6. ^ Harrison, Bobby (January 7, 2020). "Two House Democrats become independents as new four-year term begins". mississippitoday.org. Retrieved January 7, 2020.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 32°18′14″N 90°10′55″W / 32.303889°N 90.182047°W / 32.303889; -90.182047