Mississippi State Bulldogs baseball

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Mississippi State Bulldogs baseball
2018 Mississippi State Bulldogs baseball team
Mississippi State Bulldogs baseball logo.svg
Founded 1885
Overall record 2,640–1,561–29 (.628)[1]
University Mississippi State University
Athletic director John Cohen
Head coach Chris Lemonis (1st season season)
Conference SEC
West Division
Location Starkville, Mississippi
Home stadium Dudy Noble Field
(Capacity: 15,500)
Nickname Bulldogs
Colors Maroon and White[2]
         
College World Series runner-up
2013
College World Series appearances
1971, 1979, 1981, 1985, 1990, 1997, 1998, 2007, 2013, 2018
NCAA regional champions
1979, 1981, 1985, 1990, 1997, 1998, 2000, 2001, 2007, 2011, 2013, 2016, 2017, 2018
NCAA Tournament appearances
1949, 1953, 1965, 1966, 1970, 1971, 1978, 1979, 1981, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2016, 2017, 2018
Conference tournament champions
1979, 1985, 1987, 1990, 2001, 2005, 2012
Conference champions
1909, 1911, 1918, 1921, 1922, 1924, 1948, 1949, 1965, 1966, 1970, 1971, 1979, 1985, 1987, 1989, 2016

The Mississippi State Bulldogs baseball team is the varsity intercollegiate baseball team representing Mississippi State University in NCAA Division I college baseball. The program is a member of the West Division of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The current head coach is Chris Lemonis, who replaced interim head coach Gary Henderson. It has appeared in the College World Series 10 times, most recently in 2018. They earned their highest finish in their 2013 CWS appearance, losing in the finals to UCLA, finishing the season with a consensus No. 2 ranking, the highest in program history.

History[edit]

Mississippi State has won eleven SEC Championships in 1948, 1949, 1965, 1966, 1970, 1971, 1979, 1985, 1987, 1989, and 2016.

It has won the SEC Tournament seven times, in 1979, 1985, 1987, 1990, 2001, 2005, and 2012. As shown in the List of SEC champs, it has also won six SEC postseason two-team playoffs, in 1948, 1949, 1965, 1966, 1970, and 1971. The seven tournament championships and six playoff championships are a total of thirteen SEC postseason championships, the most of any school.

Prior to the formation of the SEC, the program won the Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association championship in 1909, 1911, 1918, 1921, and 1922 as well as the Southern Conference title in 1924.

The program has also appeared in 33 NCAA Regionals and 10 College World Series, with its highest finish being second place in 2013. Between 1992 and 2003, a Bulldogs pitcher was selected in the first round of the MLB draft 6 times.[3]

Venue[edit]

The Bulldogs play their home games at Dudy Noble Field, Polk-DeMent Stadium. Dubbed the "Carnegie Hall of College Baseball" by Nelle Cohen, wife of former MSU skipper and current Athletic Director John Cohen,[4] it was the host site of the first SEC tournament and holds the NCAA baseball on-campus attendance record of 15,586 spectators, set in a game against the University of Mississippi in 2014.[5] The stadium has hosted each of the top 10 largest crowds to attend an on-campus college baseball game.[3][6][7] In 2013 Paul Swaney, of Stadium Journey, ranked it as the number one collegiate ballpark.[8] One of the venue's most prominent features is the Left Field Lounge, an outfield area where spectators can gather and enjoy the games in a tailgate setting, including stands built on top of old pick-up trucks and trailers.[9][10][11][12]

(Old) Dudy Noble Field/Polk-Dement Stadium

In 2005, the Palmeiro Center, a 68,000-square-foot (6,300 m2) indoor practice facility, was built next to Dudy Noble. The facility, made possible by a gift from program alumnus Rafael Palmeiro and his wife Lynne, features an infield practice area, additional training area, and three batting cages. A baseball coaches' office complex located between the Palmeiro Center and Dudy Noble Field was also built in 2005. The complex, which includes a baseball heritage room, was made possible by contributions from former Bulldog players Jeff Brantley, Will Clark, Eric DuBose, Paul Maholm, Jay Powell and Bobby Thigpen, along with sports agent and former Bulldog manager Bo McKinnis.[13]

Attendance[edit]

The program has set many attendance records at Dudy Noble Field. SEC weekend games usually draw the largest crowds to Dudy Noble Field. Mississippi State currently holds the NCAA record for the largest single game on-campus baseball attendance at 15,586 and the largest SEC crowd for a 3-game weekend series at 39,181. In 2007, in a Super Regional against the Clemson Tigers, Mississippi State set NCAA attendance records for Super Regional games with 12,620 and 13,715 fans. More than 5,000,000 spectators have attended games at the venue since the university started tracking attendance numbers in 1976.[6][14] Mississippi State holds nine of the top 10 and 17 of the top 25 on-campus crowds in college baseball history, including 14 crowds of over 12,000 and 42 crowds of over 10,000.

Shown below are the 10 largest home crowds in Mississippi State history. Note that nine of these crowds are among the NCAA's 10 largest ever on-campus crowds.

Rank Attendance Opponent Date Note
1 15,586 Mississippi April 12, 2014 NCAA On-Campus Record
2 15,078 Texas A&M April 16, 2016 #2 NCAA On-Campus Record
3 14,991 Florida April 22, 1989 #3 NCAA On-Campus Record
4 14,562 Auburn April 20, 2013 #4 NCAA On-Campus Record
5 14,378 Louisiana State April 16, 1988 #5 NCAA On-Campus Record
6 13,761 Arkansas April 25, 1992 #6 NCAA On-Campus Record
7 13,715 Clemson June 9, 2007 #8 NCAA On-Campus Record
NCAA Super Regional Single-Game Record
8 13,617 Georgia April 8, 2006 #9 NCAA On-Campus Record
9 13,452 Arizona June 11, 2016 #10 NCAA On-Campus Record
10 13,224 Mississippi April 11, 2014 #11 NCAA On-Campus Record

MLB First Round Draft Picks[edit]

Year Player Pick Team
1966 Del Unser 18 Washington Senators
1985 Rafael Palmeiro 22 Chicago Cubs via Padres
1985 Will Clark 2 San Francisco Giants
1992 B.J. Wallace 3 Montreal Expos
1993 Jay Powell 19 Baltimore Orioles
1994 Carlton Loewer 23 Philadelphia Phillies
1997 Eric Dubose 21 Oakland Athletics via Orioles
1999 Matt Ginter 22 Chicago White Sox via Mets
2003 Paul Maholm 8 Pittsburgh Pirates
2007 Ed Easley 61* Arizona Diamondbacks
2012 Chris Stratton 20 San Francisco Giants
2013 Hunter Renfroe 13 San Diego Padres
2016 Dakota Hudson 34 St. Louis Cardinals
2017 Brent Rooker 35** Minnesota Twins

* 1st round of the 2007 MLB Supplemental Draft

** Taken in the Competitive Balance 1st round of the 2017 MLB Draft

Mississippi State's 1st Team All-Americans[edit]

Player Position Year(s) Selectors
Del Unser Outfield 1966 SN
Philip Still Third Base 1971 ABCA
Nat "Buck" Showalter Outfield 1977 ABCA
Mike Kelly Outfield 1979 ABCA
Mark Gillaspie Outfield 1981 ABCA
Rafael Palmeiro First Base 1983, 1984, 1985 BA, ABCA, SN
Will Clark First Base 1984, 1985 SN, BA, ABCA
Jeff Brantley Pitcher 1985 ABCA, BA
Pete Young Utility player 1989 ABCA
Gary Rath Pitcher 1994 ABCA, BA
Brian Wiese Utility player 1998 NCBWA
Brad Corley Outfield 2004 BA
Edward Easley Catcher 2010 ABCA
Chris Stratton Pitcher 2012 ABCA, BA, CB, NCBWA
Jonathan Holder Pitcher 2013 CB, NCBWA
Hunter Renfroe Outfield 2013 ABCA, BA, CB, NCBWA
Jacob Lindgren Pitcher 2014 BA
Brent Rooker First Base 2017 ABCA, BA, CB, NCBWA
Source:"SEC All-Americas". secsports.com. Archived from the original on 2008-05-28. Retrieved 2008-07-24. 

ABCA: American Baseball Coaches Association BA: Baseball America CB: Collegiate Baseball NCBWA: National Collegiate Baseball Writers Association Denotes consensus All-American

Individual awards[edit]

National awards[edit]

Rafael Palmeiro (1983)[15]
Will Clark (1985)[16]
Ron Polk (1985)[17]
Ed Easley (2007)[18]
Brent Rooker (2017)[19]
Gary Henderson (2018)[20]
  • Rawlings Coach of the Year
Gary Henderson (2018)[21]

SEC Awards[edit]

Brent Rooker (2017)
Chris Stratton (2012)

Prominent players[edit]

Coaches[edit]

Only those who coached 3 or more seasons and 30 or more games.[22]

Coach Years Overall % Conf % SECT % NCAA Post Season
Overall % Super Reg % CWS %
W. D. Chadwick 1910–1918 120–72–9 .619 57–50–6 .531
C.R."Dudy"Noble 1920–1947 267–201–9 .569 70–82 .461
R."Doc"Patty 1948–1956 116–73 .614 78–59 .569 6–3† .667 2–4 .333
Paul Gregory 1957–1974 328–200–1 .621 161–113 .588 9–5† .643 7–9 .438 0–2 .000
Ron Polk 1976–1997
2002–2008
1139–590–2 .659 419–324 .564 44–35 .557 57–44 .564 2–0 1.00 6–12 .333
Pat McMahon 1998–2001 164–88 .651 63–52 .548 8–7 .533 13–10 .565 0–4 .000 1–2 .333
John Cohen 2009–2016 284–203–1 .583 108–130 .454 11–8 .579 18–11 .621 3–4 .429 3–2 .600

† There was no SEC Baseball Tournament before 1977. Records are for the two team playoff that determined the SEC champion.

Year-by-year results[edit]

Season Coach Overall Conference Standing Postseason
Independent (1885–1903)
1885 W.J. "Will" Jennings 3–0
1886 W.J. "Will" Jennings 2–0
1887 W.J. "Will" Jennings 2–0
1888 W.J. "Will" Jennings 5–1
1889 G.C. Creelman 3–0
1890 G.C. Creelman 4–0
1891 G.C. Creelman 3–0
1892 G.C. Creelman 2–0
1893 G.C. Creelman 2–0–2
1894 No Team
1895 G.C. Creelman 1–0–1
1896 G.C. Creelman 0–2
1897 unknown 2–1
1898 No Team
1899 unknown 1–1
1900 No Team
1901 No Team
1902 S.W. Scales 5–1
1903 unknown 9–3
Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association (1904–1920)
1904 unknown 6–5 4–5
1905 S.A. Jehl 11–5 4–2
1906 Bert Noblett 9–8–1 3–2–1
1907 F.P. Plass 8–6 1–5
1908 F.P. Plass 19–13–2 4–7
1909 Dolly Stark 22–4 10–2 1st
1910 W. D. Chadwick 16–11 2–5
1911 W. D. Chadwick 16–7 10–6 1st
1912 W. D. Chadwick 14–8–1 7–7
1913 W. D. Chadwick 16–10–2 8–6–1
1914 W. D. Chadwick 11–9–2 5–6–1
1915 W. D. Chadwick 12–9–2 8–6–2
1916 W. D. Chadwick 11–7 6–6
1917 W. D. Chadwick 14–3–2 9–1–2
1918 W. D. Chadwick 10–8 4–7 1st
1919 Stanley L. Robinson 13–6 6–4
1920 Dudy Noble 8–8 6–6
Southern Conference (1921–1932)
1921 Dudy Noble 13–8 6–6 1st
1922 Dudy Noble 16–6–3 7–1–1 1st
1923 Dudy Noble 14–9 11–7
1924 Dudy Noble 17–7 12–3 1st
1925 Dudy Noble 19–7 9–5
1926 Dudy Noble 18–12 10–8
1927 Dudy Noble 13–8–1 9–7
1928 Dudy Noble 12–8 7–6
1929 Dudy Noble 9–6–3 3–5
1930 Dudy Noble 12–12 6–7
1931 Dudy Noble 12–9 8–5
1932 Dudy Noble 8–10 3–5
Southeastern Conference (1933–present)
1933 Dudy Noble 10–5 3–5 2nd
1934 Dudy Noble 11–5 8–4 2nd
1935 Dudy Noble 8–3 8–3 2nd
1936 Dudy Noble 8–5–1 6–4 3rd
1937 Dudy Noble 12–3 8–3 3rd
1938 Dudy Noble 5–7 3–7 10th
1939 Dudy Noble 7–10 3–10 11th
1940 Dudy Noble 5–9 4–7 7th
1941 Dudy Noble 8–9 7–8 7th
1942 Dudy Noble 8–6–1 6–7 6th
1943 Dudy Noble 3–9 3–9 T-7th
1944 No Team
1945 No Team
1946 Dudy Noble 3–12 2–9 6th
1947 Dudy Noble 8–8 7–8 8th
1948 R. P. "Doc" Patty 17–8 12–5 1st SEC Championship Series (3–0, Won)
1949 R. P. "Doc" Patty 19–6 13–3 1st SEC Championship Series (3–1, Won)
NCAA District III Tournament (1–2), 3rd
1950 R. P. "Doc" Patty 13–6 9–5 3rd
1951 R. P. "Doc" Patty 11–9 6–9 T-8th
1952 R. P. "Doc" Patty 12–11 6–9 T-9th
1953 R. P. "Doc" Patty 15–7 12–3 2nd SEC Championship Series (0–2, Lost)
NCAA District III Tournament (1–2), 3rd
1954 R. P. "Doc" Patty 9–7 7–7 8th
1955 R. P. "Doc" Patty 9–10 7–9 T-7th
1956 R. P. "Doc" Patty 11–9 6–9 9th
1957 Paul Gregory 13–5 10–5 T-4th
1958 Paul Gregory 14–10 8–6 5th
1959 Paul Gregory 12–13 5–10 T-10th
1960 Paul Gregory 16–11 8–8 7th
1961 Paul Gregory 12–7 7–6 5th
1962 Paul Gregory 21–5–1 14–1–1 2nd SEC Championship Series (1–2, Lost)
1963 Paul Gregory 17–11 9–7 T-4th
1964 Paul Gregory 17–12 7–7 5th
1965 Paul Gregory 16–10 11–4 1st SEC Championship Series (2–0, Won)
NCAA District III Tournament (1–2)
1966 Paul Gregory 20–11 11–4 1st SEC Championship Series (2–1, Won)
NCAA District III Tournament (1–2)
1967 Paul Gregory 17–14 9–9 T-5th
1968 Paul Gregory 16–17 7–10 8th
1969 Paul Gregory 20–10 11–7 4th
1970 Paul Gregory 32–8 11–4 1st SEC Championship Series (2–1, Won)
NCAA District III Tournament (2–2)
1971 Paul Gregory 32–12 13–5 1st SEC Championship Series (2–0, Won)
NCAA District III Tournament (3–1)
College World Series (0–2)
1972 Paul Gregory 24–16 7–11 T-6th
1973 Paul Gregory 16–14–1 5–9 9th
1974 Paul Gregory 13–14 8–9 6th
1975 Jimmy Bragan 16–24 6–16 10th
1976 Ron Polk 28–17 11–12 T-5th
1977 Ron Polk 33–15 11–9 T-5th SEC Tournament (1–2, 3rd)
1978 Ron Polk 38–18 13–8 3rd SEC Tournament (3–2, 2nd)
NCAA Regional (2–2, 2nd)
1979 Ron Polk 48–12 17–2 1st SEC Tournament (3–0, Won)
NCAA Regional (4–1, Won)

College World Series (1–2, T-5th)
1980 Ron Polk 31–19 10–11 5th
1981 Ron Polk 46–17 17–6 1st SEC Tournament (1–2, 3rd)
NCAA Regional (3–0, Won)
College World Series (1–2, T-5th)
1982 Ron Polk 28–23 11–13 7th
1983 Ron Polk 42–15 17–5 1st SEC Tournament (2–2, 2nd)
NCAA Regional (3–2, 2nd)
1984 Ron Polk 45–16 18–5 2nd SEC Tournament (1–2, 3rd)
NCAA Regional (3–2, 2nd)
1985 Ron Polk 50–15 16–8 1st SEC Tournament (3–0, Won)
NCAA Regional (3–1, Won)

College World Series (2–2, T-3rd)
1986 Ron Polk 34–21 12–15 7th
1987 Ron Polk 39–22 13–13 6th SEC Tournament (4–0, Won)
NCAA Regional (1–2, 4th)
1988 Ron Polk 44–20 17–10 3rd SEC Tournament (3–2, 2nd)
NCAA Regional (2–2, 3rd)
1989 Ron Polk 54–14 20–5 1st SEC Tournament (1–2, T-4th)
NCAA Regional (4–2, 2nd)
1990 Ron Polk 50–21 17–9 3rd SEC Tournament (4–1, T-1st)
NCAA Regional (4–1, Won)
College World Series (1–2, T-5th)
1991 Ron Polk 42–21 12–9 3rd SEC Tournament (2–2, 3rd)
NCAA Regional (2–2, 3rd)
1992 Ron Polk 40–22 15–9 3rd SEC Tournament (1–2, T-5th)
NCAA Regional (2–2, 3rd)
1993 Ron Polk 41–21 17–12 4th SEC Tournament (West) (3–2, 2nd)
NCAA Regional (0–2, T-5th)
1994 Ron Polk 36–23 15–12 4th SEC Tournament (West) (2–2, 3rd)
1995 Ron Polk 34–25 11–16 9th SEC Tournament (West) (1–2, 5th)
1996 Ron Polk 38–24 17–13 5th SEC Tournament (1–2, T-5th)
NCAA Regional (1–2, 4th)
1997 Ron Polk 47–21 19–11 3rd SEC Tournament (1–2, T-5th)
NCAA Regional (5–1, Won)
College World Series (1–2, T-5th)
1998 Pat McMahon 42–23 14–15 6th SEC Tournament (2–2, T-3rd)
NCAA Regional (4–1, Won)
College World Series (1–2, T-5th)
1999 Pat McMahon 42–21 15–13 6th SEC Tournament (2–2, T-3rd)
NCAA Regional (2–2, 2nd)
2000 Pat McMahon 41–20 17–10 4th SEC Tournament (0–2, T-7th)
NCAA Regional (3–1, Won)
NCAA Super Regional (0–2, Lost)
2001 Pat McMahon 39–24 17–13 T-4th SEC Tournament (4–0, Won)
NCAA Regional (3–0, Won)
NCAA Super Regional (0–2, Lost)
2002 Ron Polk 34–24–1 14–15 7th SEC Tournament (1–2, T-5th)
2003 Ron Polk 42–20–1 17–12 4th SEC Tournament (2–2, T-3rd)
NCAA Regional (2–2, 2nd)
2004 Ron Polk 35–24 13–17 9th NCAA Regional (1–2, 3rd)
2005 Ron Polk 42–22 13–16 7th SEC Tournament (4–0, Won)
NCAA Regional (2–2, 2nd)
2006 Ron Polk 37–23 12–17 9th NCAA Regional (2–2, 2nd)
2007 Ron Polk 38–22 15–13 4th SEC Tournament (0–2, T-7th)
NCAA Regional (3–0, Won)
NCAA Super Regional (2–0, Won)
College World Series (0–2, T-7th)
2008 Ron Polk 23–33 9–21 12th
2009 John Cohen 25–29 9–20 12th
2010 John Cohen 23–33 6–24 11th
2011 John Cohen 38–25 14–16 6th SEC Tournament (0–2, T-7th)
NCAA Regional (3–0, Won)
NCAA Super Regional (1–2, Lost)
2012 John Cohen 40–24 16–14 T-5th SEC Tournament (5–1, Won)
NCAA Regional (1–2, 3rd)
2013 John Cohen 51–20 16–14 5th SEC Tournament (3–1, T-3rd)
NCAA Regional (3–1, Won)
NCAA Super Regional (2–0, Won)
College World Series (3–2, 2nd)
2014 John Cohen 39–24 18–12 T-3rd SEC Tournament (2–2, T-5th)
NCAA Regional (2–2, 2nd)
2015 John Cohen 24–30 8–22 14th
2016 John Cohen 44–18–1 21–9 1st SEC Tournament (1–2, T-5th)
NCAA Regional (3–0, Won)
NCAA Super Regional (0–2, Lost)
2017 Andy Cannizaro 40–27 17–13 5th SEC Tournament (2–2, T-5th)
NCAA Regional (4–1, Won)
NCAA Super Regional (0–2, Lost)
2018 Andy Cannizaro
Gary Henderson
39–29 15–15 T-7th SEC Tournament (0–1, T-9th)
NCAA Regional (4–1, Won)
NCAA Super Regional (2–1, Won)
College World Series (2–2, T-3rd)
2019 Chris Lemonis
Total: 2,645–1,563–29

      National champion         Postseason invitational champion  
      Conference regular season champion         Conference regular season and conference tournament champion
      Division regular season champion       Division regular season and conference tournament champion
      Conference tournament champion

50 Win Seasons[edit]

Year Coach W L SEC Champ SECT Champ Postseason Result CWS Final Rank CWS Record Total Postseason Record
1985 Ron Polk 50 15 College World Series 3rd 2–2 5–3
1989 Ron Polk 54 14 Regionals N/A N/A 4–2
1990 Ron Polk 50 21 College World Series 5th 1–2 5–3
2013 John Cohen 51 20 College World Series Runner-Up 2nd 3–2 8–3

All-time record vs. SEC teams[edit]

Opponent Won Lost Tied Percentage First Last
Alabama 196 214 4 .478 1896 2018
Arkansas 56 48 0 .538 1960 2018
Auburn 107 92 1 .538 1908 2018
Florida 48 64 0 .429 1923 2018
Georgia 47 48 0 .495 1915 2017
Kentucky 62 41 0 .602 1925 2018
LSU 212 182 0 .538 1907 2018
Missouri 9 2 0 .818 2003 2018
Ole Miss 253 207 5 .549 1893 2018
South Carolina 34 38 0 .472 1981 2017
Tennessee 58 28 0 .674 1907 2017
Texas A&M 16 14 0 .533 1907 2018
Vanderbilt 71 48 2 .595 1913 2018
Totals 1169 1023 12 .533

Rivalries[edit]

In baseball, MSU has two main rivals, LSU and Ole Miss.

Against LSU, the Bulldogs hold a 207–175–1 all-time series lead over LSU in a series that got its start in 1907.

Against Mississippi, Mississippi State now leads the series 248–204–5. Retired Mississippi State head baseball coach, Ron Polk, was 85–49 against Mississippi. John Cohen, MSU's former coach, was 8–11 in SEC Conference games and 11–17 overall against Mississippi. Andy Cannizaro was 4-0 against Mississippi in 2017. Gary Henderson, MSU's current interim head coach, is 3-1 against Mississippi. The two teams play a 3-game series each year that counts in the SEC standings and one non-conference game in Jackson, MS. The game in Jackson was called the Mayor's Trophy from 1980 to 2006, and from 2007 to present the game has been called the Governor's Cup. The Mayor's Trophy series ended 14–13 in favor of the Rebels. With the 2007 season, the non-conference meeting between the two teams moved to Trustmark Park in Pearl, Mississippi – which is the home to the Mississippi Braves. Mississippi State holds the lead in the Governor's Cup 7–4.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "2016 MISSISSIPPI STATE BASEBALL MEDIA GUIDE". Mississippi State University Athletics 2016. p. 2. Retrieved June 30, 2016. 
  2. ^ "Downloadable Assets". Mississippi State University Office of Public Affairs. Retrieved January 21, 2017. 
  3. ^ a b Mississippi State University 2013 Baseball Media Guide Archived 2013-12-10 at the Wayback Machine.
  4. ^ "Cohen tries to continue revival of MSU baseball". Retrieved 30 March 2017. 
  5. ^ Bonner, Michael (13 April 2014). "Mississippi State rallies in 10th to steal win from Ole Miss". Jackson Clarion Ledger. Retrieved 13 April 2014. 
  6. ^ a b This is Mississippi State Baseball by the Numbers...
  7. ^ "MSU now holds top ten on-campus attendances". Retrieved 30 March 2017. 
  8. ^ 2013 College Baseball Ballpark Rankings
  9. ^ Photo of Left Field Lounge from http://www.glimpseofourlife.com/2012/06/4h-club-congress-at-mississippi-state.html
  10. ^ Miller, Jennifer. "4H Club Congress at Mississippi State University". Retrieved 30 March 2017. 
  11. ^ "BRAD LOCKE: Passion for baseball runs deep at Mississippi State – Daily Journal". 5 February 2013. Retrieved 30 March 2017. 
  12. ^ "Leftfield Lounge News – College baseball...Lounge Lizard style". Retrieved 30 March 2017. 
  13. ^ "COACHES & STAFF" (PDF). Mississippi State. 2008. Retrieved 15 June 2017. 
  14. ^ "Dudy Noble Field, Polk-DeMent Stadium – Mississippi State Athletics". Retrieved 30 March 2017. 
  15. ^ "Baseball America Awards - BaseballAmerica.com". 20 July 2016. Retrieved 30 March 2017. 
  16. ^ http://web.usabaseball.com/goldenspikes/winners.jsp
  17. ^ "Coach Of The Year - BaseballAmerica.com". 30 June 2008. Retrieved 30 March 2017. 
  18. ^ "MSU's Edward Easley Wins Bench Award As Nation's Top Catcher – Mississippi State Athletics". Retrieved 30 March 2017. 
  19. ^ http://baseballnews.com/2017-ncaa-div-1-baseball-americans.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  20. ^ "Mississippi State's Gary Henderson named NCBWA National Coach of the Year". 16 June 2018. Retrieved 25 June 2018. 
  21. ^ "Henderson Named 2018 Perfect Game/Rawlings Coach Of The Year". MSU Athletics. Retrieved 13 June 2018. 
  22. ^ "2016 MISSISSIPPI STATE BASEBALL MEDIA GUIDE". Mississippi State University Athletics 2016. Retrieved June 30, 2016. 

External links[edit]

External links[edit]