Missouri Department of Corrections

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Missouri Department of Corrections
Abbreviation MODOC
MO - DOC.png
Patch of the Missouri Department of Corrections
Agency overview
Formed 1820
Employees 11,000
Legal personality Governmental: Government agency
Jurisdictional structure
Operations jurisdiction* State of Missouri, USA
Map of USA MO.svg
Map of Missouri Department of Corrections's jurisdiction.
Size 87.1 square miles (226 km2)
Population 6,083,672 (2015 est.)
General nature
Operational structure
Headquarters 2729 Plaza Drive Jefferson City, MO
Elected officer responsible Eric Greitens, Governor of the State of Missouri
Agency executives
  • Anne L. Precythe, Director
  • Matt Sturm, Deputy Director
Parent agency State of Missouri
Facilities
Correctional Facilities

Community supervision centers
21

6
Website
Missouri DOC Website
Footnotes
* Divisional agency: Division of the country, over which the agency has usual operational jurisdiction.

The Missouri Department of Corrections is a state agency of Missouri that operates state prisons. It is headquartered in Jefferson City.

Facilities[edit]

Below is a list of Missouri state correctional facilities.

Name Highest security
Algoa Correctional Center Minimum
Boonville Correctional Center Minimum
Chillicothe Correctional Center (Minimum, Medium, Maximum)
Cremer Therapeutic Community Center
Crossroads Correctional Center (Maximum,Medium)
Eastern Reception, Diagnostic and Correctional Center (Minimum, Medium, Maximum, Diagnostic)
Farmington Correctional Center (Medium, Minimum)
Fulton Reception and Diagnostic Center (Minimum, Diagnostic)
Jefferson City Correctional Center (Maximum, Medium)
Kansas City Reentry Center (Minimum)
Maryville Treatment Center (Minimum)
Missouri Eastern Correctional Center (Medium)
Moberly Correctional Center (Medium, Minimum)
Northeast Correctional Center (Medium, Minimum)
Ozark Correctional Center (Minimum)
Potosi Correctional Center (Minimum, Medium, Maximum)
South Central Correctional Center (Minimum, Medium, Maximum)
Southeast Correctional Center (Minimum, Medium, Maximum)
Tipton Correctional Center (Minimum)
Western Missouri Correctional Center (Medium, Minimum)
Western Reception, Diagnostic and Correctional Center (Minimum, Diagnostic)
Women's Eastern Reception, Diagnostic and Correctional Center (Minimum, Medium, Maximum, Diagnostic)


Former facilities:

As of 2010 the state did not use private prisons or export prisoners to facilities in other states.[2] Previously, in 1995, the state had exported prisoners to the Newton County Correctional Center in Newton, Texas, to temporarily alleviate overcrowding. The two private prisons in the state (Integrity Correctional Center near Holden, Missouri and Bridewell Prison in Bethany, Missouri) both closed in 2010, and had never held Missouri state inmates.[3][4]

Deaths of prisoners[edit]

As of March 2010, the leading cause of prisoner deaths is cancer. Heart disease and liver disease are the next most common causes of prisoner deaths.[5] Among all Missouri residents, heart disease, cancer, and chronic lower respiratory disease are the most frequent causes of deaths.[6]

Operations[edit]

Prisoners newly inducted into the MDOC system are placed in diagnostic institutions. Adult male prisoners may go to either the Eastern Reception & Diagnostic Center, the Fulton Reception & Diagnostic Center, or the Western Reception & Diagnostic Center. All incoming female prisoners, including adults and minors under 17 who are convicted on adult charges in adult courts, are sent to the Women's Eastern Reception, Diagnostic & Correctional Center. Male prisoners under 17 years of age who are convicted in adult criminal courts were sent to the Northeast Correctional Center which no longer houses minor offenders, minors are now sent to Farmington Correctional Center.[citation needed] Male death row inmates are sent directly to Potosi Correctional Center.[7]

The department has a problem with harassment of and by its employees. During the period from fiscal 2002 to 2006, the state paid out just $340,000 in court awards to its own employees. During the period from 2012 to 2016, the figure was over $7.5 million. Court documents show a culture of sexual and racial harassment by employee against other employees.[8]

Death row[edit]

The first person executed in the modern era was George Mercer who was executed at the Missouri State Penitentiary in Jefferson City, Missouri on January 6, 1989.[9] The next 61 executions starting with Gerald Smith were done at the Potosi Correctional Center in Potosi, Missouri. Since 2005, executions have been 25 miles east of Potosi at the Eastern Reception, Diagnostic and Correctional Center in Bonne Terre, Missouri. The first execution at Bonne Terre was #63 Donald Jones.

Missouri Reentry Conference[edit]

Each year, the Missouri Department of Corrections co-sponsors a Missouri Reentry Conference held in Tan-Tar-A Resort in Osage Beach.[10] The conference, which began in 2005, features speakers and workshops concerning issues surrounding Missouri’s ex-offender population. The conferences average over 300 attendees annually. The intent of the conference is to provide high-quality education and networking opportunities for corrections professionals and community-based partners involved in the state’s reentry process.

In addition to the Missouri Department of Corrections, other co-sponsors include Area Resources for Community and Human Services (ARCHS), the Missouri Department of Social Services, and Family and Community Trust (FACT).

Fallen officers and staff members[edit]

Since the establishment of the Missouri Department of Corrections, 12 officers and two staff members have died while on duty.[11]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ https://www.sos.mo.gov/BlueBook/2011-2012/6_Corr.pdf page 290
  2. ^ http://sentencingproject.org/doc/publications/inc_Too_Good_to_be_True.pdf pages 4-5
  3. ^ http://www.treanorarchitects.com/treanor-justice/johnson-county-mo-jail-expansion/
  4. ^ http://stlouis.cbslocal.com/2013/01/04/for-sale-one-medium-security-missouri-prison/
  5. ^ "Inside Out Family Newsletter". Missouri Department of Corrections. March 2010. 3. Retrieved on September 1, 2010
  6. ^ "Leading Cause of Death Indicators" Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services. 2013. Retrieved on April 1, 2016
  7. ^ "FFWeb.pdf". Missouri Department of Corrections. 2. Retrieved on September 18, 2010.
  8. ^ Dillon, Karen (22 November 2016). "Prison Broke: The Missouri Department of Corrections can't escape its own worst habits". The Pitch. Retrieved 8 December 2016. 
  9. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2009-12-26. Retrieved 2015-07-02. 
  10. ^ Missouri Reentry Conference
  11. ^ The Officer Down Memorial Page

External links[edit]