Mitchell Duke

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Mitchell Duke
Mitchell Duke.jpg
Duke playing for Central Coast Mariners in 2012
Personal information
Full name Mitchell Thomas Duke
Date of birth (1991-01-18) 18 January 1991 (age 31)
Place of birth Liverpool, New South Wales, Australia
Height 1.85 m (6 ft 1 in)[1]
Position(s) Striker / Winger
Club information
Current team
Fagiano Okayama
Number 19
Youth career
Liverpool Rangers
2009 Parramatta Eagles
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
2009–2010 Parramatta Eagles
2010–2015 Central Coast Mariners 66 (13)
2011Blacktown City FC (loan) 21 (4)
2015–2018 Shimizu S-Pulse 89 (3)
2019–2020 Western Sydney Wanderers 37 (18)
2020–2021 Al-Taawoun 12 (0)
2021Western Sydney Wanderers (loan) 17 (6)
2021– Fagiano Okayama 31 (6)
National team
2021 Australia Olympic 4 (1)
2013– Australia 17 (7)
*Club domestic league appearances and goals, correct as of 3 June 2022
‡ National team caps and goals, correct as of 2 February 2022

Mitchell Thomas Duke (born 18 January 1991) is an Australian international soccer player who plays for Fagiano Okayama in the J2 League.

Duke was born in Liverpool, New South Wales and played youth soccer with Paramatta Eagles before starting his professional career with Central Coast Mariners. He joined J-League side Shimizu S-Pulse in 2015.

Duke has fifteen caps and seven goals for the Australia men's national soccer team.

Early life[edit]

Duke was born in Liverpool, in Sydney's south-west. He attended All Saints Catholic College, Liverpool and All Saints Catholic Senior College Casula.

Playing career[edit]

Club[edit]

He began his career with Parramatta Eagles before moving into the Central Coast Mariners' youth team. On 9 February 2011, Duke made his senior debut for the Mariners and also scored his first goal in a 3–1 win over Gold Coast United.[2]

On 24 January 2012 it was announced he had signed his first senior contract signing a two-year contract with Central Coast Mariners.[3]

In August 2013, Duke had a two-week trial with English Premier League side West Ham United.[4]

In the 2012/13 season, Duke scored 6 goals from 21 games. In the 2013/14 season, he wasn't as prolific, scoring 3 goals in 29 games. In the 2014/15 season, he had 3 goals from 15 games.[5] The decrease in goals can be attributed to Duke being played increasingly on the right wing by coach Phil Moss rather than the centre forward position he began his career playing.

On 9 February 2015, Duke announced that he was flying to Japan to complete a move to Shimizu S-Pulse.[6] In April 2016, Duke suffered an anterior cruciate ligament injury, ruling him out of football for at least six months.[7]

Duke left Shimizu in December 2018, after 4 seasons with the club.[8]

On 25 January 2019, Mitchell Duke announced that he had moved back home and signed with Western Sydney Wanderers FC and captained the club.

On 22 August 2020, Duke signed a 2-year deal with Al-Taawoun.[9] He scored the winning goal against Al-Duhail in a AFC Champions League group stage fixture on 25th September 2020 but fell out of favour with the club leadership shortly after, having moved from his forward position to the wing. On 1 February 2021, Duke returned to Australia and signed for his former club Western Sydney Wanderers on loan for the remainder of the 2020–21 A-League season.[10]

On 5 August 2021, Duke joined Fagiano Okayama.[11]

International[edit]

Duke was first named in the Australian national football team squad in July 2013, for the 2013 EAFF East Asian Cup.[12] Duke made his debut in the first game of the tournament in a draw with South Korea.[13] He scored his first international goal in the next match, a 3–2 loss to Japan.[14] Duke scored again in the following match which Australia lost 4–3 to China.[15]

7 September 2013, Duke next played for the Socceroos in a 0–6 friendly loss to Brazil, at Estadio Nacional Mane Garrincha in Brasília. Mitch came on as a second half substitute for Josh Kennedy in the 78th minute.[16]

Duke qualified for the Tokyo 2020 Olympics. He was part of the Olyroos Olympic squad. The team beat Argentine in their first group match but were unable to win another match. They were therefore not in medal contention.[17]

Career statistics[edit]

Club[edit]

As of 2 January 2019.[18][19]
Club Season League National Cup [a] AFC League Cup [b] Total
Division Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals
Central Coast Mariners 2010–11 A-League 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1
Blacktown City Demons (loan) 2011 NSW PL 21 4 0 0 0 0 2 1 23 5
Central Coast Mariners 2011–12 A-League 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0
2012–13 21 6 0 0 7 2 0 0 28 8
2013–14 29 3 0 0 6 0 0 0 35 3
2014–15 15 3 3 0 0 0 0 0 18 3
Mariners total 66 13 3 0 14 2 0 0 83 15
Shimizu S-Pulse 2015 J1 League 29 1 0 0 0 0 3 0 32 1
2016 J2 League 7 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 1
2017 J1 League 31 1 1 1 0 0 6 0 38 2
2018 22 0 1 0 0 0 4 1 27 1
Shimizu total 89 3 2 1 0 0 13 1 104 5
Total 176 20 5 1 14 2 15 2 210 25
  1. ^ Includes appearances in the Australian FFA Cup and Japanese Emperor's Cup
  2. ^ Includes appearances in the NSW Waratah Cup and Japanese J.League Cup

International[edit]

Statistics accurate as of match played 16 November 2021.
Australia
Year Apps Goals
2013 4 2
2019 2 0
2021 9 5
Total 15 7

International goals[edit]

As of 16 November 2021[20]
No. Date Venue Cap Opponent Score Result Competition
1 25 July 2013 Hwaseong Stadium, Hwaseong, South Korea 2  Japan 1–2 2–3 2013 EAFF East Asian Cup
2 28 July 2013 Olympic Stadium, Seoul, South Korea 3  China PR 3–4 3–4 2013 EAFF East Asian Cup
3 7 June 2021 Jaber Al-Ahmad International Stadium, Kuwait City, Kuwait 8  Chinese Taipei 4–0 5–1 2022 FIFA World Cup qualification
4 5–1
5 2 September 2021 Khalifa International Stadium, Doha, Qatar 10  China PR 3–0 3–0 2022 FIFA World Cup qualification
6 7 October 2021 Khalifa International Stadium, Doha, Qatar 12  Oman 3–1 3–1 2022 FIFA World Cup qualification
7 16 November 2021 Sharjah Stadium, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates 15  China PR 1–0 1–1 2022 FIFA World Cup qualification

Honors[edit]

Club[edit]

Central Coast Mariners

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "M. Duke". Soccerway. Retrieved 5 January 2019.
  2. ^ "Mariners blow Gold Coast away". ABC. 9 February 2011. Retrieved 14 October 2014.
  3. ^ "Mariners re-sign young defender Sainsbury". ABC. 24 January 2012. Retrieved 14 October 2014.
  4. ^ Smithies, Tom (21 August 2013). "Mitchell Duke says experience of training with West Ham will help him in upcoming A-League season with Central Coast Mariners". The Advertiser (Adelaide). Retrieved 14 October 2014.
  5. ^ "Australia - M. Duke - Profile with news, career statistics and history - Soccerway".
  6. ^ Duke takes J-League opportunity
  7. ^ Somerford, Ben (24 April 2016). "Duke suffers long-term injury". FourFourTwo. Retrieved 25 April 2016.
  8. ^ Thomas, Josh. "Mitchell Duke eyes European move after Japanese adventure ends in frustration". Goal.com. Retrieved 30 December 2018.
  9. ^ "التعاون يتعاقد مع مهاجم سيدني".
  10. ^ "Wanderers announce the return of Duke". Western Sydney Wanderers. 1 February 2021.
  11. ^ "ミッチェル デューク選手 加入のお知らせ". Fagiano Okayama. Retrieved 22 November 2021.
  12. ^ "Socceroos name East Asian Cup squad". St George and Sutherland Shire Leader. 16 July 2013. Retrieved 14 October 2014.
  13. ^ Strachan, Iain (22 July 2013). "New Socceroo Duke describes 'dream come true'". Goal.com. Retrieved 14 October 2014.
  14. ^ "Japan edge Australia 3–2 in EAFF East Asian Cup". Japan Football Association. 25 July 2013. Retrieved 14 October 2014.
  15. ^ "Socceroos' loss to China leaves them winless in East Asian Cup". The Guardian. 28 July 2013. Retrieved 14 October 2014.
  16. ^ "Socceroos routed 6–0 by Brazil". Sydney Morning Herald. 8 September 2013. Retrieved 14 October 2014.
  17. ^ "Australian Olympic Team for Tokyo 2021". The Roar. Retrieved 25 February 2022.
  18. ^ Nippon Sports Kikaku Publishing inc./日本スポーツ企画出版社, "J1&J2&J3選手名鑑ハンディ版 2018 (NSK MOOK)", 7 February 2018, Japan, ISBN 978-4905411529 (p. 114 out of 289)
  19. ^ Nippon Sports Kikaku Publishing inc./日本スポーツ企画出版社, "2017 J1&J2&J3選手名鑑 (NSK MOOK)", 8 February 2017, Japan, ISBN 978-4905411420 (p. 139 out of 289)
  20. ^ "Matches of M. Duke". Soccerway. Retrieved 5 December 2013.

External links[edit]