Mizoribine

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Mizoribine
Mizoribine.png
Clinical data
AHFS/Drugs.com International Drug Names
Routes of
administration
Oral
ATC code
  • none
Legal status
Legal status
  • In general: ℞ (Prescription only)
Identifiers
Synonyms 1-[(2R,3R,4S,5R)-3,4-dihydroxy-5-(hydroxymethyl)oxolan-2-yl]-5-hydroxyimidazole-4-carboxamide
CAS Number
PubChem CID
ChemSpider
UNII
KEGG
ECHA InfoCard 100.164.876
Chemical and physical data
Formula C9H13N3O6
Molar mass 259.21 g/mol
3D model (Jmol)
  (verify)

Mizoribine (INN, trade name Bredinin) is an immunosuppressive drug. The compound was first observed in Tokyo, Japan, in 1971.[1] It is a natural product, first isolated from the mould Eupenicillium brefeldianum. Mizoribine (MZB) is an imidazole nucleoside that has been used in renal transplantation, and in steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome, IgA nephropathy, lupus, as well as for adults with rheumatoid arthritis, lupus nephritis and other rheumatic diseases. MZB exerts its activity through selective inhibition of inosine monophosphate synthetase and guanosine monophosphate synthetase, resulting in the complete inhibition of guanine nucleotide synthesis without incorporation into nucleotides. It arrests DNA synthesis in the S phase of cellular division. Thus, MZB has less toxicity than azathioprine, another immunosuppressant used for some of the same diseases.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hiroaki Ishikawa (1999). "Mizoribine and Mycophenolate Mofetil". Current Medicinal Chemistry. Bentham Science. 6 (7): 575–597. PMID 10390602. 


Mizoribine (MZB) is an imidazole nucleoside that has been used in renal transplantation, and in steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome, IgA nephropathy, lupus, as well as for adults with rheumatoid arthritis, lupus nephritis and other rheumatic diseases. MZB exerts its activity through selective inhibition of inosine monophosphate synthetase and guanosine monophosphate synthetase, resulting in the complete inhibition of guanine nucleotide synthesis without incorporation into nucleotides. It arrests DNA synthesis in the S phase of cellular division. Thus, MZB has less toxicity than azathioprine, another immunosuppressant used for some of the same diseases.