Moana (character)

This is a good article. Click here for more information.
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
(Redirected from Moana (Disney character))

Moana
Moana character
Moana Disney.webp
Moana as she appears in Moana (2016).
First appearanceMoana (2016)
Created by
Voiced by
In-universe information
Full nameMoana Waialiki[1][2]
TitleChieftess of Motunui
AffiliationDisney Princesses
Family
  • Chief Tui (father)
  • Sina (mother)
  • Tala (paternal grandmother)
NationalityPolynesian

Moana Waialiki of Motunui is the title character of Walt Disney Animation Studios' 56th animated feature film Moana (2016). Created by directors Ron Clements and John Musker, Moana is originally voiced by Hawaiian actress and singer Auliʻi Cravalho. As a toddler, she is voiced by Louise Bush. Moana is set to appear in the Disney+ sequel series Moana: The Series, which will premiere in 2024.

Inspired by Polynesian mythology, Moana is depicted as the strong-willed daughter of a chief of a Polynesian village, who is chosen by the ocean itself to reunite a mystical relic with the goddess Te Fiti. When a blight strikes her island, Moana sets sail in search of Maui (Dwayne Johnson), a legendary demigod, in the hope of returning the relic to Te Fiti and saving her people.

Moana received widespread critical acclaim for her independence as well as Cravalho for her vocal performance. By 2019, Moana was officially inducted into the Disney Princess line-up, becoming the twelfth member.

Development[edit]

Conception and writing[edit]

Directors Ron Clements (right) and John Musker (left) created Moana.

After directing The Princess and the Frog (2009), Clements and Musker started working on an adaptation of Terry Pratchett's Mort,[3] but problems with acquiring the necessary film rights prevented them from continuing with that project. To avoid a recurrence of that issue, they pitched three original ideas.[4][5] The genesis of one of those ideas (the one that was ultimately green-lit) occurred in 2011, when Musker began reading up on Polynesian mythology and learned of the heroic exploits of the demigod Māui. Intrigued with the rich culture of Polynesia, he felt it would be a suitable subject for an animated film. Shortly thereafter, Musker and Clements wrote a treatment and pitched it to John Lasseter, who recommended that both of them should go on research trips.[6][7] Accordingly, in 2012, Clements and Musker went on research trips to Fiji, Samoa, and Tahiti to meet the people of the South Pacific Ocean and learn about their culture.[8] At first, they had planned to make the film entirely about Maui, but their initial research trips inspired Clements to pitch a new idea focused on the young daughter of a chief.[9]

Clements and Musker were fascinated to learn during their research that the people of Polynesia abruptly stopped making long-distance voyages about three thousand years ago. Their navigational traditions predated those of European explorers, beginning around 300 CE. Native people of the Pacific possessed knowledge of the world and their place in it prior to the incursion of foreigners. For example, Kānaka Maoli (Native Hawaiians) were well aware of the existence of far away islands, had names for these places, and were interested in exploring them to benefit their societies. This voyaging heritage was made possible by a geographical knowledge system based on individual perspectives rather than the European cardinal direction system. The reasons for the halt of this voyaging tradition remain unknown, but scholars have offered climate change and resulting shifts in ocean currents and wind patterns as one possible explanation.[10] Native peoples of the Pacific resumed voyaging again a thousand years later; Clements and Musker set the film at that point in time, about two thousand years ago. The setting on a fictional island in the central Pacific Ocean drew inspiration from elements of the real-life island nations of Fiji, Samoa, and Tonga.[11]

Taika Waititi wrote the initial screenplay,[12] but went home to New Zealand in 2012 to focus on his newborn first child and What We Do in the Shadows (2014).[13] The first draft focused on Moana as the sole daughter in a family with "five or six brothers",[14] in which gender played into the story. However, the brothers and gender-based themes were deleted from the story, as the directors thought Moana's journey should be about finding herself. A subsequent draft presented Moana's father as the one who wanted to resume voyage navigation, but it was rewritten to have him oppose navigation so he would not overshadow Moana.[7] Instead, Pamela Ribon came up with the idea of a grandmother character for the film,[15] who would serve as a mentor linking Moana to ancient traditions.[14] Another version focused on Moana rescuing her father, who had been lost at sea. The film's story changed drastically during the development phase, and that idea ultimately survived only as a subtle element of the father's backstory.[16]

Voice[edit]

In late 2014, a global casting call for the role of Moana began.[17][18] Cravalho did not consider auditioning for Moana as there had "already been so many great submissions over YouTube"[19] and decided to focus on school instead as she was in her first year which was "confusing as it is".[20] Cravalho was discovered at an audition to perform as entertainment at a non-profit event, without knowing that the agent who had attended those auditions was the same for Moana.[20] Agent Rachel Sutton asked Cravalho if she wanted to audition for Moana; she was the last girl to be seen on the last day of casting.[21] During her audition, Cravalho sang 30 seconds of her favorite Disney song—"I See the Light" from Tangled—as well as Hawaiian songs. Cravalho stated she was confused throughout the entire audition—especially the process of slating—but felt she "gave it [her] best in the audition and it worked really well."[20] In October 2015, Cravalho was officially chosen as Moana's voice actress.[19] Producer Osnat Shurer said: "We were looking for someone who could embody the character, with all the strength and commitment, humor, heart and compassion. When we met Auliʻi, she was just bringing Moana to life."[22]

"I've grown up on an island all my life—so has she—and we're both deeply connected to our culture. I go to an all-Hawaiian school, so even the mythology and the folklore of Maui is something I grew up with. I love that Disney has taken the time and effort to do research about us and extensive research about our culture and find those wonderful stories about Maui. [...] Her journey is something I feel as well—that journey to find yourself. It's a recurring theme I think everyone can really take away [from]."
—Auli‘i Cravalho on her similarities with Moana[20]

Cravalho described Moana as being brave, beautiful, kind and strong, explaining she could list adjectives "all day".[19][20] She called her a model for everyone, not just for girls.[23] Furthermore, she stated that Moana recognises her desires and is eager to obtain them. The actress enjoyed viewing her development and her assistance to grow her culture.[19] Cravalho stated Moana is "different" from other Disney characters since she was "truly described as a Disney heroine", being both "empowered and empowering" and not having a love interest.[20] She compared her to Mulan since they were both "kick butt".[20] Cravalho "thoroughly enjoyed and will always feel deeply connected to Moana and voicing her as the strong, independent, beautiful heroine that she is."[20]

Since Cravalho had never done professional film work before, she was surprised about many things in the process. She recorded a line up to "30 or 40 times".[24] She explained a different stress or emphasis on a particular word could create different emotions.[24] 40 engineers would listen to her and listen to every grunt, voice change and volume change Cravalho made, listening for the exact emotion that they wanted to give in the film.[20] Usually, the directors decided which take they would put in the final film.[24] She also felt it was hard to be comfortable in the recording booth; usually, there were cameras for the animators to be able to add realistic facial expressions to the character. She was not sure how she should act while cameras were filming her recording her lines.[20] When she sang, Cravalho needed the lights to be turned down. She asked for this since she did not want to feel like anybody was watching her since there were directors, animators, and writers watching her, sometimes sketching her and sometimes watching how she pronounced words.[24] Cravalho was not used to the cameras and the "lights, camera, action" process[20] and never recorded with co-stars Dwayne Johnson, Temuera Morrison, or Rachel House.[24] Cravalho reprised the role in 2017, dubbing the character again in the special Hawaiian-language dubbing of the movie.[25]

Personality and design[edit]

Musker explained he and Clements invited a story without romance and alternatively have a focus on female empowerment with True Grit-quality: "the determined girl who teams up with a washed-up guy. They have this adventure and she finds her true calling—and saves the world in the process."[26] He also said he appreciated the idea of an "action-adventure princess that could dive off cliffs and battle monsters".[27] Shurer said, to make a female protagonist, they needed to "make her whole in and of herself".[28] Furthermore, she said they wanted Moana to be self-assertive and have both compassion and courage to set her apart from other characters.[28]

The creative team decided to create for Moana a realistic model with which girls could identify themselves, strong enough to be credible in activities, such as swimming, climbing a tree and jumping off a cliff.[29][9] Shurer stated it was an "absolutely" conscious decision, further explaining that since they were writing a "hero's journey", she needed to be identifiable to all.[30] Musker said this was intentional and partially prompted by hopes for her to be distinctive. Additionally, they aimed to create an experienced "action hero".[31] The visual development drawings of the people of the South Pacific also had realistic bodies. Musker said it "seemed right" for her to have this body as Moana performed many stunts that require a lot of physicality.[31] There were also women who worked on Moana who greatly hoped for her to have a realistic body.[31]

To make the hair more realistic and expressive, a new program, Quicksilver, was created.[32] Disney Elastic Rods was created to support twist for Moana's curly hair and the Multicurve for new twist information.[33] To make the hair look realistic when wet, animators had models with similar hair to Moana's dunk their head in water.[34] There were "collision driven hair rigs" which opened up "the possibilities of what the character's hair was able to do".[33] Artistic direction and continuity was influenced by the freedom of motion, with most of the performance made through simulation. A new grab node was developed to help the curls of Moana's hair interact and collide. Various levels of wind were required for the character's hair since the film was set outside; as a result, the majority of the hair shots were the first time the Disney animators had animated such shots.[33]

The costume designers wanted to make Moana's dress as authentic to her culture as possible. For example, the red color of Moana's dress was used to signify royalty at the time and since buttons did not exist, visual development artist Neysa Bové added a boar's tusk to keep the dress together. Bové stated Moana's top is made of mulberry while her skirt is made of pandanas. Bové added a slit at the front of Moana's dress so she could do the different activities she did in the film. She stated that with Moana, a large amount of research occurred at the Pacific Islands, where the film takes place. The film, however, was intended to be set 2,000 years before, making photo references impossible. Instead, they acquired material references from their Oceanic Trust.[35] Much exploration was done for Moana's necklace, which is seen throughout most of the film.[35]

We found this abalone shell. It's actually a mollusk, and you find this on all the Pacific Islands; it's something they use quite a bit. What's beautiful about it is that it sort of looks like a rock until you start scraping that away, and you reveal this beautiful abalone beneath it with all these ocean colors [...] I sort of added a curve to the shell and it's a nice juxtaposition between land and sea, and as a voyager she uses the stars to navigate, so I added some star carvings up on top of the shell.

— Bové, Disney Style[35]

International versions[edit]

Moana is voiced by Hawaiian singer Auliʻi Cravalho in the English and Hawaiian versions.

When the movie had its first theatrical release worldwide, it numbered 45 versions overall, including a special Tahitian-language dubbing created specifically for the movie.[36] In June 2017, a Māori-language version of the movie, featuring four voice-actors from the original English cast, was announced.[37] Three weeks later, New Zealander Jaedyn Randell was introduced as Moana's voice. The movie was released in September 2017.[38] In the same year, Shruti Rane (Hindi) reprised her role in the Bengali-language version of the movie. In November 2017, a Hawaiian-language dubbing was announced to be underway, with Auliʻi Cravalho reprising her role as Moana.[39][25] The movie premiered on June 10, 2018.[25]

In many European countries, Moana's name was changed to "Vaiana" due to a trademark conflict.[40] The film was released in those countries to bear the alternative name in the title.[41]

  Highlighted versions were released later than 2016

Appearances[edit]

Films[edit]

Moana[edit]

Moana's grandmother, Tala, tells the story of Maui, the shape-shifting demigod of the wind and sea and master of sailing who stole goddess Te Fiti's heart. However, Te Fiti disintegrates, and Maui is attacked by Te Kā, a volcanic demon. His magical fishhook and Te Fiti's heart are lost in the ocean. The ocean then chooses Moana to return the heart to Te Fiti. Tui and Sina, Moana's mother, try to keep her away from the ocean to prepare her to become the island's chief. Sixteen years later, blight strikes her island and to attempt to prevent it, Moana suggests going beyond the reef which her father forbids her to. She tries with Pua the Pig but is overpowered by the waves and is shipwrecked back to shore. Tala shows Moana a secret cavern full of ships, revealing her ancestors were voyagers but stopped after Te Fiti's heart was stolen due to the ocean no longer being safe. She further explains Te Kā is causing the blight and she must seek Maui and the heart to stop it. On her deathbed, Tala convinces Moana to do so.

Setting sail on a camakau from the cavern, Moana is caught in a typhoon and shipwrecked on an island where she finds Maui, who boasts about his achievements. She demands that Maui return the heart, but he refuses and traps her in a cave. She escapes and confronts Maui who reluctantly lets her onto the camakau. They are then attacked by Kakamora—coconut pirates—who, like other creatures, seek the heart. Moana and Maui escape them and Moana convinces Maui to help her by saying Maui is no longer a hero and should redeem himself by returning the heart. First, Moana and Maui must retrieve Maui's fishhook in Lalotoi, the Realm of Monsters, from Tamatoa, a giant coconut crab. Maui takes his fishhook, only to find he does not have control over his shape-shifting anymore. Moana outwits Tamatoa and they escape. Maui reveals to Moana he became a demigod after his mortal parents abandoned him, the gods took pity on him and granted him powers. After Maui's confession, the two grow closer.

They are attacked by Te Kā after they arrive at Te Fiti's island. Moana refuses to turn back, resulting in Maui's hook being badly damaged. Unwilling to lose his hook in another confrontation, Maui abandons a tearful Moana who asks the ocean to find someone else to restore the heart and loses hope. The ocean obliges and takes the heart, but Tala's spirit appears, inspiring Moana to find her true calling. She retrieves the heart and sails back to confront Te Kā. Maui returns, having had a change of heart, and buys Moana time to reach Te Fiti by fighting Te Kā, destroying his hook in the process. Moana discovers Te Fiti is missing, and realizes Te Kā is Te Fiti, corrupted without her heart. Moana tells the ocean to clear a path, allowing her to return Te Fiti's heart, and the restored goddess heals the ocean and islands of the blight. Maui apologizes to Te Fiti, who restores his hook and gives Moana a new boat before falling into a deep sleep and becoming a mountain. Moana bids farewell to Te Fiti, returning home where she reunites with her parents. She takes up her role as chief and wayfinder, leading her people as they resume voyaging.

Ralph Breaks the Internet[edit]

A "meta" version of the character appears with other Disney princesses and Elsa and Anna from Frozen (2013) in the Wreck-It Ralph (2012) sequel, Ralph Breaks the Internet (2018). When some of the princesses describe to Vanellope von Schweetz how they stare at "important water" to gain inspiration for their songs, Moana says she stares at the ocean. Later, when Ralph is falling from a tower and needs saving by the princesses, Moana causes water from a fountain to spiral upwards so that Elsa can freeze it into a slide to slow Ralph's fall, saying "You're Welcome" after saving him.

Television[edit]

Moana, as she appears in the Disney Parks.

Moana: The Series[edit]

In December 2020, it was announced that Moana would have a self-titled spin-off TV series debuting on Disney+ in 2023.[101] The release date was later pushed back to 2024.[102]

Merchandise[edit]

By 2019, Moana was inducted into the Disney Princess line-up, becoming the twelfth member of the media franchise, and toyline featuring female protagonists from various Disney animated films.[103][104] In 2016, Disney released a Moana doll with sustainable packaging.[105] On November 17, 2016, Disney released Moana: Rhythm Run, a premium mobile game as well as adding Moana content to Disney Stickers, Disney Crossy Road, Disney Emoji Blitz, Disney Story Central, and Disney Jigsaw Puzzles.[106] On January 2, 2017, Disney released Moana: Island Life, a free-to-play mobile game.[107]

Theme parks[edit]

On November 16, 2016, prior to her film's release, Moana made her debut at Walt Disney World, doing meet-and-greets at Disney's Polynesian Resort.[108] On November 18, 2016, Moana appeared in a surprise pre-parade of the Happy Birthday Mickey cavalcade in Disneyland Paris.[109] On November 20, 2016, in Disneyland Paris, Moana began doing meet-and-greets at the Animation Station interactive post-show area of Art of Disney Animation.[110] Since its debut on May 12, 2017, Moana appeared in Happily Ever After in Magic Kingdom, singing "How Far I'll Go".[111] After Tokyo Disneyland's refurbishment of "It's A Small World", Moana and Pua were featured in the Polynesian scene.[112] Since the stage show's opening on May 25, 2018, Moana performed in Moana: A Homecoming Celebration in Hong Kong Disneyland.[113] Moana has also appeared in Summer Blast in Shanghai Disneyland since 2019.[114]

Reception[edit]

Critical reviews[edit]

"She chooses to be a forward-thinking leader of her people on her own terms, rather than a stereotypical princess in need of rescue, which the film acknowledges in amusingly knowing fashion. She has both the wisdom to respect her people's traditions and the bravery to blaze her own trail toward the future."
Christy Lemire, RogerEbert.com film critic[115]

The Verge stated that Moana is a fully-rounded character with a believable, while still idealized body. They also praised her resourcefulness and the fact she does not end up partnered at the end of the film.[116] IGN conveyed that she is a wonderful role model for her perseverance and courage.[117] Victoria McNally states that she is the most revolutionary Disney Princess by not having a love interest, being a good leader, and embracing her culture.[118] A. O. Scott of The New York Times said Moana was "inspiring" due to her smartness, bravery and decency.[119] The fact Moana did not aim to meet a prince was praised by Firstpost.[120] Plugged In writer Bob Hoose lauded Moana's focus, determination, and the fact she was able to face death to fix the wrongs of the past.[121] The Times of India wrote "she also conquers your heart. You won't regret setting sail and voyaging with her."[122] The Guardian commended Moana since she cared about nature and was willing to face the challenges of the future.[123] Variety described her as "one of Disney's most remarkable heroines yet" since she did not await a prince and took control of her own destiny.[124] The Stanford Daily praised Moana's development and her "human traits" which were not present in previous Disney Princesses.[125]

Cravalho was also praised for her voice acting and singing. Screen Rant called her performance "lively and charismatic".[126] Common Sense Media stated Cravalho and Johnson shared a "refreshingly student-and-mentor-like chemistry".[127] Firstpost said she was going to be a "huge star" in the future and felt her "insane" singing range was one of the most surprising things in the film.[120] Rolling Stone described Cravalho's performance as sassy.[128] The Guardian and Radio Times felt Cravalho's voice acting and singing were beautiful.[123][129] RogerEbert.com said Cravalho showed skills beyond her age and praised her grace, timing and energy.[115] Flixist wrote Cravalho was an "absolute delight".[130] The New Zealand Herald compared her voice acting to that of Mickey Mouse Club.[131] The Hollywood Reporter was impressed by Cravalho's voice acting and complimented her singing range.[132] Entertainment Weekly wrote Cravalho "show[ed] off her pipes" during Moana's "I Want" song "How Far I'll Go".[133]

The character has not been without criticism, however. ScreenCrush said it was "not impossible" to criticize Moana's "underwhelming qualities".[134] Film Inquiry felt Moana lacked originality and unpredictability in her arc, calling her a "carbon copy of every other Disney Princess".[135] Similarly, Den of Geek found it unfortunate that Moana was an "inversion" of Ariel from The Little Mermaid.[136]

Accolades[edit]

Moana received a nomination for Best Animated Female from the Alliance of Women Film Journalists, tieing for the award with Judy Hopps from Zootopia.[137] Additionally, Moana and Maui were nominated for Favourite Frenemies at the 2017 Kids' Choice Awards, losing the award to characters from Zootopia.[138] Cravalho has also received and been nominated for several other awards including winning an Annie Award for Outstanding Voice Acting[139] and being nominated for two Teen Choice Awards, winning one for Choice Breakout Movie Actress.[140]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Gioia, Michael (November 23, 2016). "Moana, with Music by Lin-Manuel Miranda, Hits Theatres". Playbill. Archived from the original on November 23, 2016. Retrieved March 7, 2021.
  2. ^ Meehan, Jillian (February 17, 2017). "'Moana' Deleted Songs and Scenes Detail Cut Brothers, Maui's Past". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on February 18, 2017. Retrieved March 7, 2021.
  3. ^ Connelly, Brendon (April 6, 2013). "What Disney's Film of Terry Pratchett's Mort Might Have Looked Like... And A Preview of Things To Come". Bleeding Cool. Archived from the original on April 8, 2013. Retrieved January 28, 2021.
  4. ^ Zahed, Ramin (December 16, 2013). "New Info Arrives on Musker/Clements' 'Moana'". Animation Magazine. Archived from the original on December 20, 2013. Retrieved March 7, 2021.
  5. ^ Miller, Bruce (August 24, 2013). "Sioux City native Ron Clements preps new film for Disney studio". Sioux City Journal. Archived from the original on April 8, 2015. Retrieved January 28, 2021.
  6. ^ Ron Clements and John Musker (November 23, 2016). "The Irascible Ron Clements and John Musker Talk 'Moana'". Animation World Network (Interview). Interviewed by Dan Sarto. Archived from the original on March 19, 2021. Retrieved January 28, 2021.
  7. ^ a b Giardina, Caroline (November 25, 2016). "'Moana' Directors Reveal How the Story Changed". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on November 26, 2016. Retrieved January 28, 2021.
  8. ^ Deitchman, Beth (Spring 2016). "Finding Her Way: Directors John Musker and Ron Clements Have Charted A Course For Their New Film, Moana, Which Sails Into Theatres In November 2016". Disney Twenty-three. Burbank: The Walt Disney Company. 8 (1): 32–33. ISSN 2162-5492. OCLC 698366817.
  9. ^ a b Robinson, Joanna (November 16, 2016). "How Pacific Islanders Helped Disney's Moana Find Its Way". Vanity Fair. New York. Archived from the original on November 25, 2016. Retrieved January 28, 2021.
  10. ^ Chang, David A. (2016). "Looking Out From Hawai'i's Shore: The Exploration of the World is the Inheritance of Native Hawaiians". The World and All the Things Upon It: Native Hawaiian Geographies of Exploration. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press. pp. 1–32.
  11. ^ Julius, Jessica; Malone, Maggie (2016). The Art of Moana. San Francisco: Chronicle Books. p. 10. ISBN 9781452158976.
  12. ^ "Taika Waititi behind Disney script 'Moana'". The New Zealand Herald. October 21, 2014. Archived from the original on October 21, 2014. Retrieved January 28, 2021.
  13. ^ Hunt, Elle (March 20, 2017). "Taika Waititi on shaking up Thor and being a Hollywood outsider: 'They take this stuff so seriously'". The Guardian. Archived from the original on March 21, 2017. Retrieved January 28, 2021.
  14. ^ a b Giroux, Jack (November 23, 2016). "Interview: 'Moana' Directors John Musker and Ron Clements on Making Their First CG Movie". /Film (Interview). Archived from the original on November 24, 2016. Retrieved January 28, 2021.
  15. ^ Ron Clements and John Musker (November 27, 2016). Moana: Ron Clements & John Musker Official Movie Premiere Interview. ScreenSlam. Event occurs at 4:50. Archived from the original (Video) on January 5, 2017 – via YouTube.
  16. ^ Topel, Fred (November 21, 2016). "Moana Directors Talk The Films Influences and Fun References". Den of Geek. Archived from the original on November 23, 2016. Retrieved January 28, 2021.
  17. ^ Project Casting (December 3, 2014). "Disney's "Moana" Lead Role Talent Search Open Casting Call". Project Casting. Archived from the original on December 10, 2014. Retrieved February 16, 2021.
  18. ^ Asher, Christina (December 2, 2014). "Moana". CNA Casting. Archived from the original on December 5, 2014. Retrieved February 16, 2021.
  19. ^ a b c d Rice, Lynette (October 7, 2015). "The Next Disney Princess is Moana's Auli'i Cravalho". People. Archived from the original on October 6, 2016. Retrieved February 17, 2021.
  20. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Cravalho, Auli‘i (November 30, 2016). "Auli'i Cravalho on Voicing a New Kind of Disney Heroine as Princess Moana". Harper's Bazaar (Interview). Interviewed by Julie Kosin. Archived from the original on December 2, 2016. Retrieved February 17, 2021.
  21. ^ Wang, Frances Kai-Hwa (October 7, 2015). "The Next Disney Princess is Native Hawaiian Auli'i Cravalho". NBC News. Archived from the original on October 8, 2015. Retrieved February 18, 2021.
  22. ^ "5 Things You Should Know About Disney's Moana Starring Auli'i Cravalho and Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson". Honolulu. October 13, 2015. Archived from the original on October 14, 2015. Retrieved August 29, 2019.
  23. ^ ""Moana" Star Auli'i Cravalho is Not Your Average Disney Princess". Honolulu. November 2016. Archived from the original on November 2, 2016. Retrieved August 29, 2019.
  24. ^ a b c d e Cravalho, Auli‘i (November 22, 2016). "Auli'i Cravalho Knows the Way!". ComingSoon.net (Interview). Interviewed by Silas Lesnick. Archived from the original on November 24, 2016. Retrieved February 24, 2021.
  25. ^ a b c "Disney's Moana to make World Premiere in ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi at Ko Olina's World Oceans Day, June 10". Ko Olina. May 1, 2018. Archived from the original on May 20, 2018. Retrieved May 19, 2018.
  26. ^ Berman, Eliza (September 1, 2016). "Why Disney Decided to Make Moana the Ultimate Anti-Princess". Time. Archived from the original on September 1, 2016. Retrieved March 13, 2021.
  27. ^ Musker, John; Clements, Ron (November 23, 2016). "'Moana' Directors Reveal How They Made Disney's Next Hit". Movie Fone (Interview). Interviewed by Yolanda Machado. Archived from the original on November 29, 2016. Retrieved March 14, 2021.
  28. ^ a b Musker, John; Shurer, Osnat; Clements, Ron (February 22, 2017). "The Director and Producer of Disney's 'Moana' on Its Politics and Taika Waititi". Movie Fone (Interview). Archived from the original on March 11, 2017. Retrieved March 14, 2021.
  29. ^ Moss, Rachel (September 26, 2016). "Disney Has Finally Created A Heroine with a Realistic Body". HuffPost. Archived from the original on September 27, 2016. Retrieved February 17, 2021.
  30. ^ Burgess, Sanya (September 25, 2016). "Healthy Disney girl sticks it to icicle Elsa". The Sunday Times. Archived from the original on September 26, 2016. Retrieved February 17, 2021.
  31. ^ a b c Flaherty, Keely (September 7, 2016). "Moana Is A Disney Princess with a More "Realistic" Body Shape". BuzzFeed. Archived from the original on September 8, 2016. Retrieved February 18, 2021.
  32. ^ Desowitz, Bill (November 22, 2016). "'Moana': How Disney Innovated Water and Hair for a Greater Hand-Drawn Aesthetic". IndieWire. Archived from the original on November 23, 2016. Retrieved August 29, 2019.
  33. ^ a b c "The Art and Technology of Simulating Hair in Disney's Moana" (PDF). Walt Disney Animation. Archived from the original (PDF) on February 8, 2021. Retrieved January 28, 2021.
  34. ^ Valerio, Britt (May 30, 2017). "13 Things You Didn't Know About Moana". Oh My Disney. Archived from the original on June 6, 2017. Retrieved January 28, 2021.
  35. ^ a b c Mynott, Nicole. "Here's Your First Look at Moana Costume Concept Art". Disney Style. Archived from the original on October 30, 2020. Retrieved January 28, 2021.
  36. ^ "'Moana' to be First Disney Film Translated into Tahitian Language". Entertainment Weekly. October 25, 2016. Archived from the original on October 27, 2016. Retrieved January 11, 2017.
  37. ^ Speak Māori (June 8, 2017), Te Reo Māori Moana Casting, archived from the original on March 19, 2021, retrieved July 4, 2017
  38. ^ disney portuguêsfrançais (July 3, 2017), Meet the Maori Voices of Moana and Maui, archived from the original on September 24, 2019, retrieved July 4, 2017
  39. ^ "Instagram post by Auli'i • Nov 2, 2017 at 7:00 pm UTC". Instagram. Archived from the original on May 14, 2019. Retrieved November 4, 2017.
  40. ^ "VAIANA – trailer – Disney". September 19, 2016. Archived from the original on September 17, 2019 – via YouTube.
  41. ^ "La princesa Moana en España se llamará Vaiana (y otros problemas de branding)" [Princess Moana in Spain will be called Vaiana (and other branding problems)]. Verne (El País) (in Spanish). October 11, 2015. Archived from the original on October 12, 2015. Retrieved October 18, 2015.
  42. ^ موانا (Motion picture) (in Arabic). Egypt: Disney. 2016 – via iTunes Store.
  43. ^ মোয়ানা. Disney+ Hotstar (Motion picture) (in Bengali). India: Disney. 2017.
  44. ^ Смелата Ваяна (DVD) (in Bulgarian). Bulgaria: Disney. 2016.
  45. ^ 魔海奇緣 (DVD) (in Cantonese). Hong Kong: Disney. 2016.
  46. ^ "Chiara Grispo e María Parrado: conheça as versões latinas de Moana". LatinPop Brasil (in Brazilian Portuguese). January 10, 2017. Archived from the original on January 10, 2017. Retrieved March 21, 2021.
  47. ^ Vaiana (DVD) (in Catalan). Spain: Disney. 2016.
  48. ^ Radulović, Žarko (November 22, 2016). "Disney je promijenio ime svojeg novog filma zbog pornografije". 24sata (in Croatian). Archived from the original on November 23, 2016. Retrieved March 21, 2021.
  49. ^ Michaela Tomešová – Kam doplout mám (Odvážná Vaiana – Kam doplout mám (Michaela Tomešová)) (in Czech). DisneyCeskoVEVO. March 15, 2019. Archived from the original (Video) on July 9, 2020. Retrieved March 21, 2021 – via YouTube.
  50. ^ Quinn, Karl (June 19, 2019). "I Am Mother is an Aussie success story, though you'd never know it". The Sydney Morning Herald. Archived from the original on June 20, 2019. Retrieved March 21, 2021.
  51. ^ Vajèn van den Bosch – Ooit zal ik gaan (Van "Vaiana"/Audio Only) (in Dutch). disneymusicnlVEVO. November 25, 2016. Archived from the original (Video) on July 7, 2020. Retrieved March 21, 2021 – via YouTube.
  52. ^ Vaiana – Officiële Ondertitelde Trailer – Disney BE, Disney België, September 15, 2016, retrieved July 25, 2019
  53. ^ VAIANA – trailer – Disney, Disney Norge, September 19, 2016, retrieved July 25, 2019
  54. ^ Vaiana – Officiell trailer, Disney Sverige, June 13, 2016, retrieved July 25, 2019
  55. ^ Vaiana (English Version) [Original Motion Picture Soundtrack] [Deluxe Edition] de Varios Artistas (in European Spanish), retrieved April 12, 2021
  56. ^ Vaiana (DVD) (in Estonian). Estonia: Disney. 2016.
  57. ^ Vaiana. Disney+ Finland (Motion picture) (in Finnish). Finland: Disney. 2016.
  58. ^ Laura Tesoro – Ooit zal ik gaan (Van "Vaiana") (in Belarusian). disneymusicbeVEVO. December 16, 2016. Archived from the original (Video) on June 2, 2017. Retrieved March 21, 2021 – via YouTube.
  59. ^ Cerise Calixte – Le bleu lumière (De "Vaiana – La Légende du Bout du Monde"/Audio Only) (in French). disneymusicfrVEVO. November 25, 2016. Archived from the original (Video) on March 5, 2017. Retrieved March 21, 2021 – via YouTube.
  60. ^ Vaiana – Das Paradies hat einen Haken. Disney+ Germany (Motion picture) (in German). Germany: Disney. 2016.
  61. ^ Debby Van Dooren – Ich bin bereit (aus "Vaiana"/Audio Only) (in German). disneymusicdeVEVO. December 16, 2016. Archived from the original (Video) on January 12, 2017. Retrieved March 21, 2021 – via YouTube.
  62. ^ Θεοδοσοπούλου, Στελίνα (December 20, 2016). "Ο Μιχάλης Κουϊνέλης των Stavento και η Μαρίνα Σάττι μιλούν για την Βαϊάνα". IGN Greece (in Greek). Archived from the original on March 21, 2021. Retrieved March 21, 2021.
  63. ^ Constante, Agnes (November 17, 2017). "'Moana' star to reprise role in Hawaiian-language version of Disney hit". NBC News. Archived from the original on November 17, 2017. Retrieved March 21, 2021.
  64. ^ מואנה (DVD) (in Hebrew). Israel: Disney. 2016.
  65. ^ मोआना. Disney+ Hotstar (Motion picture) (in Hindi). India: Disney. 2016.
  66. ^ Vaiana (DVD) (in Hungarian). Hungary: Disney. 2016.
  67. ^ Vaiana (DVD) (in Icelandic). Iceland: Disney. 2016.
  68. ^ Moana. Disney+ Hotstar (Motion picture) (in Indonesian). Indonesia: Disney. 2019.
  69. ^ Oceania. Disney+ Italy (Motion picture) (in Italian). Italy: Disney. 2016.
  70. ^ Chiara Grispo – Oltre l'Orizzonte (Da "Oceania") (Official Audio) (in Italian). disneymusicitVEVO. December 16, 2016. Archived from the original (Video) on March 5, 2017. Retrieved March 21, 2021 – via YouTube.
  71. ^ Dennison, Kara (January 21, 2017). "New Japanese "Moana" Trailer Showcases Dub of "How Far I'll Go"". Crunchyroll. Archived from the original on January 23, 2017. Retrieved March 21, 2021.
  72. ^ Моана (DVD) (in Kazakh). Kazakhstan: Disney. 2016.
  73. ^ 모아나 (DVD) (in Korean). South Korea: Disney. 2016.
  74. ^ So-Hyang – Na Unjengan Ddeonnal Geoya (From "Moana") (in Korean). DisneyMusicKoreaVEVO. September 25, 2020. Archived from the original (Video) on February 23, 2021. Retrieved March 21, 2021 – via YouTube.
  75. ^ Vaiana (DVD) (in Latvian). Latvia: Disney. 2016.
  76. ^ Vaiana (DVD) (in Lithuanian). Lithuania: Disney. 2016.
  77. ^ Moana. Disney+ Hotstar (Motion picture) (in Malay). Indonesia: Disney. 2019.
  78. ^ 海洋奇缘 (DVD) (in Chinese). China: Disney. 2016.
  79. ^ 海洋奇緣 (DVD) (in Chinese). Taiwan: Disney. 2016.
  80. ^ "Jaedyn Randell wants people to see Māori Moana to help te reo Māori". The New Zealand Herald. September 11, 2017. Archived from the original on March 22, 2021. Retrieved March 21, 2021.
  81. ^ Nora Gjestvang – Hvor langt jeg må (Fra "Vaiana"/Audio Only) (in Norwegian). disneymusicnoVEVO. January 27, 2017. Archived from the original (Video) on August 3, 2019. Retrieved March 22, 2021 – via YouTube.
  82. ^ "Seans z DZIECKIEM. Najpiękniejsze filmy ANIMOWANE w TV (29.05–4.06)". Super Express (in Polish). May 29, 2020. Archived from the original on March 22, 2021. Retrieved March 22, 2021.
  83. ^ "Glam Beauty Talks: Any Gabrielly jura que seu lip balm de 9 reais faz milagres". Glamour (in Brazilian Portuguese). Archived from the original on February 28, 2021. Retrieved March 22, 2021.
  84. ^ Tocha, Cátia (November 22, 2016). "Vozes portuguesas de Vaiana contam tudo à Magazine.HD!". Magazine.HD (in European Portuguese). Archived from the original on December 21, 2016. Retrieved March 22, 2021.
  85. ^ Sara Madeira – Onde Irei Ter (De "Vaiana"/Audio Only) (in Portuguese). disneymusicptVEVO. November 18, 2016. Archived from the original (Video) on March 22, 2021. Retrieved March 22, 2021 – via YouTube.
  86. ^ Vaiana (DVD) (in Romanian). Romania: Disney. 2016.
  87. ^ Carr, Flora (May 18, 2019). "Who is Belarus' Eurovision 2019 entry Zena?". Radio Times. Archived from the original on March 22, 2021. Retrieved March 22, 2021.
  88. ^ Вајана (DVD) (in Serbian). Serbia: Disney. 2016.
  89. ^ Vaiana (DVD) (in Slovak). Slovakia: Disney. 2016.
  90. ^ Vaiana (DVD) (in Slovenian). Slovenia: Disney. 2016.
  91. ^ "Chiara Grispo e María Parrado: conheça as versões latinas de Moana". LatinPop Brasil (in Brazilian Portuguese). January 10, 2017. Archived from the original on January 10, 2017. Retrieved March 22, 2021.
  92. ^ País, El (May 15, 2018). "Qué fue de los anteriores ganadores de 'La Voz Kids'". El País (in Spanish). Archived from the original on August 25, 2018. Retrieved March 22, 2021.
  93. ^ Sara Paula Gómez Arias – Cuán lejos voy (De "Moana") (in Latin). disneymusicLAVEVO. January 6, 2017. Archived from the original (Video) on March 5, 2017. Retrieved March 22, 2021 – via YouTube.
  94. ^ Wiktoria Johansson – Vad jag kan nå (Från "Vaiana"/Audio Only) (in Swedish). disneymusicseVEVO. January 27, 2017. Archived from the original (Video) on March 22, 2021. Retrieved March 22, 2021 – via YouTube.
  95. ^ "Projection de Moana en tahitien le 29 avril, place To'ata". TAHITI INFOS, les informations de Tahiti (in French). Retrieved April 12, 2021.
  96. ^ மோனா. Disney+ Hotstar (Motion picture) (in Tamil). India: Disney. 2017.
  97. ^ Mahavongtrakul, Melalin (December 1, 2016). "Disney dreams come true". Bangkok Post. Retrieved March 22, 2021.
  98. ^ "Alper Yazıcı ve Ezgi Erol düeti "Özlüyorsan Hâlâ"". Milliyet (in Turkish). March 17, 2021. Archived from the original on March 17, 2021. Retrieved March 22, 2021.
  99. ^ Ваяна (DVD) (in Ukrainian). Ukraine: Disney. 2016.
  100. ^ Tran Minh Nhu – Chặng Đường Bao Xa (From "Moana") (in Vietnamese). DisneyMusicAsiaVEVO. December 23, 2016. Archived from the original (Video) on December 26, 2016. Retrieved March 22, 2021 – via YouTube.
  101. ^ Holloway, Daniel (December 10, 2020). "'Moana,' 'Cars,' 'Princess and the Frog' Spinoff Series Set for Disney Plus". Variety. Archived from the original on December 11, 2020. Retrieved December 13, 2020.
  102. ^ D'Alessandro, Anthony (August 4, 2021). "Walt Disney Animation Amps Up Production With New Vancouver Studio, First Project Is 'Moana' Musical Series". Deadline Hollywood. Retrieved August 4, 2021.
  103. ^ Tuttle, Brittani (March 21, 2019). "What makes a princess a Disney Princess?". Attractions Magazine. Archived from the original on July 22, 2019. Retrieved March 10, 2021.
  104. ^ Bajgrowicz, Brooke (August 22, 2019). "Disney's Unofficial Princesses, Ranked". Screen Rant. Archived from the original on September 14, 2019. Retrieved March 10, 2021.
  105. ^ "Disney and Destination Imagination Inspire Fans to Think Outside the Toy Box in Celebration of "Moana"". Disney Parks, Experiences and Products. October 21, 2016. Archived from the original on March 19, 2021. Retrieved March 7, 2021.
  106. ^ "New Moana Mobile Experiences Available Today". Disney Parks, Experiences and Products. November 17, 2016. Archived from the original on March 19, 2021. Retrieved March 7, 2021.
  107. ^ "'Moana Island Life' Launches for Mobile Devices". Disney Parks, Experiences and Products. January 26, 2017. Archived from the original on March 19, 2021. Retrieved March 7, 2021.
  108. ^ Wade, Victoria (November 16, 2016). "Moana Makes Disney World Debut". DisKingdom. Archived from the original on June 1, 2020. Retrieved March 5, 2021.
  109. ^ "Moana has made her first ever Disney Parks character appearance – in Paris!". DLP Today. November 19, 2016. Archived from the original on December 1, 2016. Retrieved March 5, 2021.
  110. ^ "Disney's latest heroine Moana is coming to Disneyland Paris in one week". DLP Today. November 12, 2016. Archived from the original on November 17, 2016. Retrieved March 5, 2021.
  111. ^ "Happily Ever After Fireworks Show at Magic Kingdom". Walt Disney World Resort. Archived from the original on March 19, 2021. Retrieved March 5, 2021.
  112. ^ Corless, Tom (August 5, 2019). ""it's a small world" at Magic Kingdom Adding Disney Characters to the Attraction for Walt Disney World's 50th Anniversary". WDW News Today. Archived from the original on August 7, 2019. Retrieved March 5, 2021.
  113. ^ "Moana: A Homecoming Celebration". Hong Kong Disneyland. Archived from the original on November 13, 2019. Retrieved March 5, 2021.
  114. ^ Porter, Stephen (June 29, 2017). "Maui Makes His First Disney Park Appearance in Shanghai Disneyland". WDW Info. Archived from the original on July 2, 2017. Retrieved March 5, 2021.
  115. ^ a b Lemire, Christy (November 22, 2016). "Moana movie review & film summary (2016)". RogerEbert.com. Archived from the original on November 23, 2016. Retrieved January 28, 2021.
  116. ^ Robinson, Tasha (November 26, 2016). "Moana review: after 80 years of experiments, Disney has made the perfect Disney movie". The Verge. Archived from the original on November 27, 2016. Retrieved July 29, 2020.
  117. ^ Goldman, Eric (November 14, 2016). "Moana Review". IGN. Archived from the original on November 15, 2016. Retrieved July 29, 2020.
  118. ^ McNally, Victoria (November 21, 2016). "7 ways 'Moana' is the most revolutionary Disney Princess yet". Revelist. Archived from the original on April 9, 2017. Retrieved August 1, 2020.
  119. ^ Scott, A. O. (November 22, 2016). "Review: 'Moana,' Brave Princess on a Voyage With a Chicken (Published 2016)". The New York Times. Archived from the original on November 22, 2016. Retrieved November 30, 2020.
  120. ^ a b Fadnavis, Mihir (December 2, 2016). "Moana movie review: Yet another lovable addition to Disney's slate of quality films". Firstpost. Archived from the original on March 9, 2017. Retrieved February 15, 2021.
  121. ^ Hoose, Bob. "Moana". Plugged In. Archived from the original on November 28, 2016. Retrieved February 15, 2021.
  122. ^ Bhave, Nihit (December 1, 2016). "Moana Review {4/5}: The movie chugs along with breathtaking animation and quirky characters". The Times of India. Archived from the original on December 1, 2016. Retrieved February 15, 2021.
  123. ^ a b Kermode, Mark (December 4, 2016). "Moana review – sail of the century from Disney". The Guardian. Archived from the original on December 4, 2016. Retrieved February 15, 2021.
  124. ^ Debruge, Peter (November 7, 2016). "Film Review: 'Moana'". Variety. Archived from the original on November 8, 2016. Retrieved February 15, 2021.
  125. ^ Kim, Elaine (December 1, 2016). "Film review: Masterful 'Moana' defies the Disney formula". Stanford Daily. Archived from the original on December 1, 2016. Retrieved February 15, 2021.
  126. ^ Schaefer, Sandy (November 23, 2016). "Moana Review". Screen Rant. Archived from the original on November 24, 2016. Retrieved February 16, 2021.
  127. ^ Chen, Sandie Angulo (June 14, 2016). "Moana". Common Sense Media. Archived from the original on December 1, 2016. Retrieved February 16, 2021.
  128. ^ Travers, Peter (November 23, 2016). "'Moana' Review: Disney's Animated Musical Is a Feminist Delight". Rolling Stone. Archived from the original on July 20, 2018. Retrieved February 16, 2021.
  129. ^ Johnston, Trevor (December 22, 2016). "Moana – review | cast and crew, movie star rating and where to watch film on TV and online". Radio Times. Archived from the original on December 5, 2017. Retrieved February 16, 2021.
  130. ^ Valdez, Nick (February 20, 2020). "Review: Moana". Flixist. Archived from the original on October 26, 2020. Retrieved February 16, 2021.
  131. ^ "Movie review: Moana". The New Zealand Herald. December 22, 2016. Archived from the original on March 19, 2021. Retrieved February 16, 2021.
  132. ^ Rechtshaffen, Michael (November 7, 2016). "'Moana': Film Review". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on November 7, 2016. Retrieved February 16, 2021.
  133. ^ Coggan, Devon (November 7, 2016). "'Moana': EW Review". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on November 7, 2016. Retrieved February 16, 2021.
  134. ^ Hayes, Britt (November 22, 2016). "'Moana' Review: A Less-Than-Fantastic Voyage From Disney". ScreenCrush. Archived from the original on November 23, 2016. Retrieved February 15, 2021.
  135. ^ Daringer, Mike (December 5, 2016). "MOANA: Animated By The Numbers". Film Inquiry. Archived from the original on December 7, 2016. Retrieved February 15, 2021.
  136. ^ Crow, David (November 14, 2016). "Moana Review". Den of Geek. Archived from the original on March 2, 2021. Retrieved February 15, 2021.
  137. ^ "2016 AWFJ EDA Award Winners". Alliance of Women Film Journalists. Archived from the original on January 6, 2017. Retrieved February 16, 2021.
  138. ^ Levy, Dani (February 2, 2017). "Justin Timberlake and Kevin Hart Lead Nickelodeon's Kids' Choice Awards Nominations". Variety. Archived from the original on February 3, 2017. Retrieved February 16, 2021.
  139. ^ Flores, Terry (February 16, 2021). "'Zootopia' Wins Top Prize at Annie Awards (Winners List)". Variety. Archived from the original on February 5, 2017. Retrieved February 5, 2017.
  140. ^ Vulpo, Mike (August 14, 2017). "Teen Choice Awards 2017 Winners: The Complete List". E!. Archived from the original on August 14, 2017. Retrieved February 16, 2021.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ In all European countries where the movie was released with the character's name changed to "Vaiana", the English dubbing was also distributed with the alternative name

External links[edit]