Modern Whig Party

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Modern Whig Party
Founded2007 (2007)
HeadquartersBuffalo, New York
IdeologyConservative liberalism[1]
Political positionCenter
International affiliationNone
Colors     Orange
Seats in the Senate
0 / 100
Seats in the House
0 / 435
Governorships
0 / 50
Seats in State Upper Houses
0 / 1,921
Seats in State Lower Houses
0 / 5,411
Website
http://www.modernwhig.org/

The Modern Whig Party is a political party in the United States founded in 2007. The party describes itself as a mainstream, middle-of-the-road grassroots[2] movement representing voters who do not strictly accept Republican[3] and Democratic positions.[4][5] The party's general platform supports fiscal responsibility[6], strong national defense, and integrity and pragmatism in government. Members of the party have won a handful of local elections, but did so under other party labels or as independents. In recent years the party has not nominated candidates for any major office. The Modern Whig Party underwent a major overhaul of its structure and leadership in late 2014 and re-launched in the early spring of 2015.

History[edit]

The whig party was started by Henry Clay[7], William H. Harrison[8][1], Daniel Webster[9], and Horace Greeley. according to the Encyclopedia Brittanica[10], (2019) "Whig Party, in U.S. history, major political party active in the period 1834–54 that espoused a program of national development but foundered on the rising tide of sectional antagonism. "[11]. The whig party was the original Party of Abraham Lincoln Party[12][13], It arose due to the fact that: "Jackson had shattered the National Republican Party”[14].The party became a major force in America politics and while it "captured most of congress and the white house by 1864"[15],It also managed to capture the Presidency, placing several U.S. Whig Party Presidents, like William Henry Harrison[16], James Madison[17], James Monroe[18], John Quincy Adams[19], and Abraham Lincoln[20] until the eve of the civil war when the party dissolved as it split into Northern and Southern Whigs),[21], ending in the rise of the current two party system.


Re-Branding of the Whig Party[22] (2007)[edit]

According to The News & Observer, the Modern Whig Party was founded by U.S. troops while they were in "the deserts of Iraq and the mountains of Afghanistan."[23] The Modern Whig Party was organized as a grassroots[24][25] movement in the beginning of 2007. It is currently active as of (2019), and reflects an ideology of centrism[26], multiculturalism[27], individualism[28], and aims to serve the needs of the community by identifying the most basic human rights guaranteed by the U.S. Constitution[29].

Media coverage[edit]

In the spring of 2010 Time rated the Modern Whig Party, the U.S. Marijuana Party, the Pirate Party, the Tea Party movement, and the American Secessionists as among the "top 10 most popular alternative political movements worldwide."[30] Opinion columns in The News & Observer before 2010 were favorable toward the party.[23]

Membership[edit]

In its first authentic electoral test, Gene L. Baldassari running on the Modern Whig ticket sought the 14th District seat in the New Jersey Assembly in the November 2, 2009, general election. He received 859 votes for just over 0.6 percent of the vote.[31][32]

Immediately after the election of November 4, 2008, a push began to attract moderate and conservative Democrats, and members of the Republican Party (GOP) who felt disenchanted with both the GOP's failings and its perception as moving further to the right.[33]

On December 12–13, 2009, the Modern Whig Party held its first national leadership council meeting in Washington, D.C.; fourteen people were in attendance.[34]

On November 5, 2013, Robert Bucholz, running on the Modern Whig Party ticket, was elected as Judge of Election for the Fifth Division in Philadelphia's 56th Ward. He beat Democrat Loretta Probasco by 36 votes to 24.[35][36] He is the first member ever to be elected to office in any state under the party name.[37][38]

State and territorial affiliates with ballot access[edit]

  • 2009: New Jersey[39]
  • 2014: Kentucky[40]
  • 2020 Washington[41].

U.S. Congressional Primary (2020) Washington[edit]

Alma Matter: University of Alaska; Advanced Degrees: International Negotiations and Conflict Resolution
Rudy Atencio is an LGBTQ American politician. Alma Matter: University of Alaska Advanced Degrees: International Negotiations and Conflict Resolution

In the spring of 2019 Rudy Atencio announced his political campaign on social media[42]. He currently subscribes to the Whig Party on the center-center position. The campaign currently embraces the philosophy of individualism[43], multiculturalism[44], and identity needs theory[45]. He is a conservative-libera[2]l[46] and is tackling issues like the rise of "corruptsocialism"[47][48], and "corrupt capitalism"[49].

As a political message Atencio believes that free markets and the combination of quotas and tariffs[50] can both dissuade price dumping on the international level, and unregulated industry growth. Atencio's campaign hinges on marriage equality, uniform private restrooms, the return of American privacy and sovereignty, and re-establishment of the middle class through prudent capitalism. His campaign slogan is "Unity!" and revolves around the philosophy of E-pluribus-unum[51]. Rudy Atencio began holding Whig Rallies via twitter on Jan 31, 2019[52], and is currently announcing his upcoming rallies on twitter. His future rallies will air accordingly, as he begins his mission to revitalize this historic party, and a culture of centrism[53] in American Politics[54]

Atencio began his career in politics in Juneau Alaska, when he mobilized Alaska state representatives, and commissioners, in 2010 at a town hall salon, in Juneau Alaska, at the University of Alaska Juneau, before graduating from the University of Alaska Anchorage[55] in 2015. Atencio went on to attend graduate school, at Creighton University Graduate School of Interdisciplinary Studies[56], where he completed his advanced degree in International Negotiations and Conflict Resolution[57] in spring of 2019[58] After graduation, Rudy Atencio went on to become a community planner and crisis intervention specialist, while also negotiating on the international level for the private sector[59].

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Values". modernwhig.org. Retrieved 28 June 2018.
  2. ^ "Major American Political Parties".
  3. ^ "Richard Cavendesh". hystorytoday.com.
  4. ^ "The Modern Whig Party". Modernwhig.info. Retrieved 2009-11-04.
  5. ^ "Whigs Revived". Albuquerque Journal. July 29, 2009. Retrieved October 8, 2013.
  6. ^ "The Republican Party Becomes the Whig Party".
  7. ^ "Henry Clay: The American Statesman".
  8. ^ "William H Harrison".
  9. ^ "Daniel Webster".
  10. ^ "Whig Party (1834–1856)", Student's Guide to Elections, CQ Press, 2008, doi:10.4135/9781452240206.n153, ISBN 9780872895522.
  11. ^ "Whig Party (1834–1856)", Student's Guide to Elections, CQ Press, 2008, doi:10.4135/9781452240206.n153, ISBN 9780872895522
  12. ^ "Whig Party (1834–1856)", Student's Guide to Elections, CQ Press, 2008, doi:10.4135/9781452240206.n153, ISBN 9780872895522
  13. ^ Howe, Daniel Walker (Winter 1995). "Why Abraham Lincoln Was a Whig". Journal of the Abraham Lincoln Association. 16 (1). hdl:2027/spo.2629860.0016.105. ISSN 1945-7987.
  14. ^ "Whig Party | History, Beliefs, Significance, & Facts". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved 2019-02-01.
  15. ^ "Whig Party | History, Beliefs, Significance, & Facts". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved 2019-02-01.
  16. ^ "Political Parties of the Presidents". www.presidentsusa.net. Retrieved 2019-02-01.
  17. ^ "Political Parties of the Presidents". www.presidentsusa.net. Retrieved 2019-02-01.
  18. ^ "Political Parties of the Presidents". www.presidentsusa.net. Retrieved 2019-02-01.
  19. ^ "Political Parties of the Presidents". www.presidentsusa.net. Retrieved 2019-02-01.
  20. ^ "Political Parties of the Presidents". www.presidentsusa.net. Retrieved 2019-02-01.
  21. ^ "Whig Party | History, Beliefs, Significance, & Facts". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved 2019-02-01.
  22. ^ "The Modern Whig Institute". The Modern Whig Institute. Retrieved 2019-02-01.
  23. ^ a b Christensen, Rob (2009-04-26). "Whigs rise again". Politics. The News & Observer. Raleigh, NC: The McClatchy Company. Archived from the original on 2009-04-29. Retrieved 2013-12-09.
  24. ^ "Major American Political Parties of the 19th Century". Norwich University Online. Retrieved 2019-02-01.
  25. ^ "Blog". The Modern Whig Institute. Retrieved 2019-02-01.
  26. ^ "Blog". The Modern Whig Institute. Retrieved 2019-02-01.
  27. ^ Wallach, Philip A. (2017-03-06). "Prospects for partisan realignment: Lessons from the demise of the Whigs". Brookings. Retrieved 2019-02-01.
  28. ^ Fox, Dixon Ryan (1918–2012). "The Economic Status of the New York Whigs". Political Science Quarterly. 33 (4): 501–518. doi:10.2307/2141604. ISSN 0032-3195. JSTOR 2141604.CS1 maint: Date format (link)
  29. ^ "On this day, the Whig Party becomes a national force - National Constitution Center". National Constitution Center – constitutioncenter.org. Retrieved 2019-02-01.
  30. ^ "Top 10 Alternative Political Movements". Time. 2010-03-29.
  31. ^ "NJ General Assembly 14". Our Campaigns. Our Campaigns. Retrieved 24 December 2018.
  32. ^ "Official List Candidate Returns for General Assembly For November 2009 General Election" (PDF). NJelections.org. New Jersey Department of State - Division of Elections. p. 14. Retrieved February 2, 2018.
  33. ^ "Republicans are Bald, Put on your Whigs" by Kyle Munzenrieder on Nov. 7, 2008 in Miami New Times
  34. ^ Dubbins, Andrew (2009-12-14). "America says it wants a third party. Why not the Modern Whigs?". Slate.com. Retrieved 2013-09-29.
  35. ^ Alex Wigglesworth, For Philly.com. "Philly elects first Whig in 157 years". Philly.com. Archived from the original on 2013-11-09. Retrieved 2013-11-10.
  36. ^ "Rare Phila. win — for a Whig!". Philly.com. Archived from the original on 2013-11-11. Retrieved 2013-11-10.
  37. ^ Jacobs, Ben. "First Win For Whigs In 150 Years". The Daily Beast. Retrieved 2013-11-10.
  38. ^ "First Whig, Robert Bucholz, elected in Philadelphia in nearly 160 years". NY Daily News. Retrieved 2013-11-10.
  39. ^ "America says it wants a third party. Why not the Modern Whigs?". Slate. 2009-12-14. Retrieved 27 September 2013.
  40. ^ "Modern Whig Party Places a Nominee". Ballot-Access.org. 2014-09-25. Retrieved 24 February 2016.
  41. ^ Atencio, Rudy. "Unity! (2020)". Twitter.com. Unity! Campaign 2020. Retrieved 1 February 2019.
  42. ^ Atencio, Rudy. "Unity! (2020)". Twitter.com. Unity Campaign 2020. Retrieved 1 February 2019.
  43. ^ Fox, Dixon Ryan (1918–2012). "The Economic Status of the New York Whigs". Political Science Quarterly. 33 (4): 501–518. doi:10.2307/2141604. ISSN 0032-3195. JSTOR 2141604.CS1 maint: Date format (link)
  44. ^ Wallach, Philip A. (2017-03-06). "Prospects for partisan realignment: Lessons from the demise of the Whigs". Brookings. Retrieved 2019-02-01.
  45. ^ Fisher, Ronald J. (1990), "Needs Theory, Social Identity and an Eclectic Model of Conflict", in Burton, John, Conflict: Human Needs Theory, The Conflict Series, Palgrave Macmillan UK, pp. 89–112, doi:10.1007/978-1-349-21000-8_5, ISBN 9781349210008
  46. ^ "Democratic-Republican Party | History & Ideology". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved 2019-02-01.
  47. ^ "Unity! (2020) Whig! (@rudy_atencio) | Twitter". twitter.com. Retrieved 2019-02-01.
  48. ^ "Socialism: The Opiate of the Corrupt and Ignorant". Economics21. 2018-11-14. Retrieved 2019-02-01.
  49. ^ "Richard Duncan - Economics". richardduncaneconomics.com. Retrieved 2019-02-01.
  50. ^ "Whig Party - Ohio History Central". www.ohiohistorycentral.org. Retrieved 2019-02-01.
  51. ^ Atencio, Rudy. "Unity! (2020)". Twitter.com. Unity Campaign 2020. Retrieved 1 February 2019.
  52. ^ "Unity! (2020) Whig! (@rudy_atencio) | Twitter". twitter.com. Retrieved 2019-02-01.
  53. ^ "I found great synonyms for "centrism" on the new Thesaurus.com!". www.thesaurus.com. Retrieved 2019-02-01.
  54. ^ Atencio, Rudy. "Unity! 2020". Twitter.com. Unity 2020 Campaign. Retrieved 1 February 2019.
  55. ^ Atencio, Rudy (2/1/2019). "2014 2015-Commencement-Graduate-List.pdf" (PDF). greenandgold.uaa.alaska.edu. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2015. Check date values in: |date= (help)
  56. ^ "Creighton University Graduate School of Interdisciplinary Studies". https://gradschool.creighton.edu/academics/department-interdisciplinary-studies. 2/1/2019. Check date values in: |date= (help); External link in |website= (help)
  57. ^ NDR. "Creighton University Negociation and Dispute Resolution" (PDF). Negotiation and Dispute Resolution.
  58. ^ creighton.edu/registrar
  59. ^ Brending, Jann (30 January 2019). "Joint city commission minutes White Salmon WA" (PDF). http:/www.white-salmon.net.

External links[edit]