Mohammed Nayim Farouq

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Mohammed Naim Farouq
Monhammed Nayim Farouq -- most wanted.jpg
Monhammed Nayim Farouq -- most wanted poster
Born 1960 (age 56–57)
Zatoon Kahil, Afghanistan
Released July 2003
Detained at Guantanamo
ISN 633
Charge(s) No charge (held in extrajudicial detention)
Status Repatriated -- DIA claims he has returned to the fight.

Mohammed Naim Farouq is a citizen of Afghanistan who was held in extrajudicial detention in the United States Guantanamo Bay detention camps, in Cuba.[1] His Guantanamo Internment Serial Number was 633.

Mohammed Naim Farouq is named on a "most wanted" poster issued by the Defense Intelligence Agency, and a press release entitled: "Ex-Guantanamo Detainees who have returned to the fight".[2][3]

Identity[edit]

  • A former Guantanamo captive listed as Mohammed Nayim Farouq is named on the list of captives who returned to the battlefield, and on the full official list released on May 15, 2006.[3]
  • A former Guantanamo captive listed as Monhammed Nayim Farouq is named on the most wanted list.[2] The most wanted list asserts he was born in 1960.
  • A former Guantanamo captive listed as Mohammed Nayim Farouq is named on the full official list of all the captives' names, released on May 15, 2006.[1] According to the list his Guantanamo Internment Serial Number is 633. The list reports that he was born in Zatoon Kahil, in 1960.

Aliases[edit]

The "most wanted" poster lists four aliases.[2]

  • Mohammed Nayim,
  • Naim Farrouqi,
  • Commander Naim,
  • Commander Naim Khan

Alleged terrorist affiliation[edit]

The most wanted poster claims Farouq is affiliated to both the Taliban and al Qaeda.[2] It asserts he has been a Taliban militia leader.

On July 16, 2007, the Department of Defense issued a press release entitled: Ex-Guantanamo Detainees who have returned to the fight.[3][4] The press release stated:

"After his release from US custody in July 2003, Farouq quickly renewed his association with Taliban and al-Qaida members and has since become re-involved in anti-Coalition militant activity."

McClatchy interview[edit]

On June 15, 2008 the McClatchy News Service published articles based on interviews with 66 former Guantanamo captives. McClatchy reporters interviewed Mohammed Naim Farouq.[5][6][7][8][9][10][11]

According to the McClatchy report Mohammed Naim Farouq was the leader of a gang of bandits prior to his capture and transport to Guantanamo, with no ties to al Qaeda or the Taliban.[11][12] Abdul Jabar Sabit Afghan Attorney General, interviewed Mohammed Naim Farouq in Guantanamo, and characterized him as a "rural gangster".

Mohammed Naim Farouq, on the other hand, describes himself as the leader of a kind of vigilante militia, who were trying to keep order in their region.[11]

He said that he and his family clashed with the Taliban, during their regime, but, eventually they

"...realized that I am from a big tribe ... so we came to an agreement."

The McClatchy report said Mohammed Naim Farouq became the head of Security for Zormat District, following the Taliban's ouster, noting:[11]

"It's not clear whether the new, U.S.-backed government appointed Farouq to that position or, more likely, whether he just had more guns than anyone else in the area."

Mohammed Naim Farouq was apprehended after he confronted some American soldiers who had apprehended some of his men.[11]

According to various Afghan officials Mohammed Naim Farouq became a Taliban leader after his repatriation.[11] He however maintained, during his interview, that he was just trying to keep order in his region.

Mohammed Naim Farouq reported routine abuse and humiliation by his American captors. He was not cooperative with his interrogators:[11]

"They asked me if I knew Osama bin Laden. I said, 'Fuck bin Laden and fuck your wife, too. Bin Laden came and destroyed our nation, and you came and destroyed our nation. But at least bin Laden was a Muslim and did not humiliate us like this.'"

Mohammed Naim Farouq told McClatchy reporters that he had opposed the Taliban, when they were in power, that his tribal militia had struggled with them, that his brother had been driven into exile.

Mohammed Naim Farouq described being taken into American custody after questioning American GIs when they had taken some of his men into custody—even though he had identified himself as the District's Police Commander.

Mohammed Naim Farouq described being repeatedly humiliated in the Kandahar detention facility and the Bagram Theater Detention Facility by being stripped naked.

"...they took me into interrogation completely naked. They asked me if I knew Osama bin Laden. I said, 'Fuck bin Laden and fuck your wife, too. Bin Laden came and destroyed our nation, and you came and destroyed our nation. But at least bin Laden was a Muslim and did not humiliate us like this.' "

Mohammed Naim Farouq described seeing an American GI in Afghanistan throw a Koran into a bucket of excrement.

Allegations he has Taliban and Al Qaeda associations[edit]

In May 2009 Elizabeth Bumiller of the New York Times, citing a leaked report leaked to her, asserted that Mohammed Naim Farouq had Taliban and Al Qaeda associations.[13] On May 26, 2009 the McClatchy News Service published a portion of their interview with Farouq. In the interview he said, everyone in his Province had welcomed the Americans. He said he was the first person captured in his Province. He said that the Hamid Karzai government had asked him to resume his job as District Chief, but that after years of humiliation while in US detention, he "had enough", and he declined.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b OARDEC (May 15, 2006). "List of Individuals Detained by the Department of Defense at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba from January 2002 through May 15, 2006" (PDF). United States Department of Defense. Retrieved 2007-09-29.  Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; name "DoDList2" defined multiple times with different content (see the help page).
  2. ^ a b c d "Most Wanted, Afghanistan/Pakistan" (PDF). Defense Intelligence Agency. October 2006. pp. 31–32. Retrieved March 14, 2007. 
  3. ^ a b c "Ex-Guantanamo Detainees who have returned to the fight" (PDF). Department of Defense. July 16, 2007. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2007-08-16. Retrieved 2007-07-16. 
  4. ^ "Fact Sheet: Former GTMO Detainee Terrorism Trends" (PDF). Defense Intelligence Agency. 2008-06-13. Retrieved 2008-07-26.  mirror
  5. ^ Tom Lasseter (June 15, 2008). "Guantanamo Inmate Database: Page 3". McClatchy News Service. Retrieved 2008-06-16.  mirror
  6. ^ Tom Lasseter (June 18, 2008). "U.S. hasn't apologized to or compensated ex-detainees". Myrtle Beach Sun. Retrieved 2008-06-18.  mirror
  7. ^ Tom Lasseter (June 15, 2008). "Pentagon declined to answer questions about detainees". McClatchy News Service. Retrieved 2008-06-20.  mirror
  8. ^ Tom Lasseter (June 16, 2008). "Documents undercut Pentagon's denial of routine abuse". McClatchy News Service. Retrieved 2008-06-20.  mirror
  9. ^ Tom Lasseter (June 19, 2008). "Deck stacked against detainees in legal proceedings". McClatchy News Service. Retrieved 2008-06-20.  mirror
  10. ^ Tom Lasseter (June 16, 2008). "U.S. abuse of detainees was routine at Afghanistan bases". McClatchy News Service. Retrieved 2008-06-20.  mirror
  11. ^ a b c d e f g Tom Lasseter (June 15, 2008). "Guantanamo Inmate Database: Mohammed Naim Farouq". McClatchy News Service. Retrieved 2008-06-15.  mirror
  12. ^ Tom Lasseter (June 17, 2008). "Militants found recruits among Guantanamo's wrongly detained". Miami Herald. Retrieved 2008-06-17.  mirror
  13. ^ Nancy A. Youssef (2009-05-26). "Did 'returning' terrorists become extremists in Guantanamo?". McClatchy News Service. Retrieved 2009-07-09.