Mohitlal Majumdar

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Mohitlal Majumdar
মোহিতলাল মজুমদার
Mohitlal Majumdar.jpg
Mohitlal Majumdar
Born (1888-10-26)26 October 1888
Kanchrapara, Nadia, Bengal, British India
Died 26 July 1952(1952-07-26) (aged 63)
Occupation Author, Critics, Professor
Nationality Indian
Notable works Bishorini

Mohitlal Majumdar (Bengali: মোহিতলাল মজুমদার) (October 26, 1888 – July 26, 1952), a renowned Bengali author, was born at Kanchrapara village in Nadia district, India. Mohitlal started as a poet, but later became better known as a literary critic.[1]

Life[edit]

Majumder, Mohitlal (1888-1952) poet, essayist and literary critic, was born in a Vaidya family on 26 October 1888 in the village of Kanchrapara in Nadia district. He graduated in arts in 1908 from Ripon College (now Surendranath College), Kolkata. He began his career as a teacher at Calcutta High School in 1908 and continued in this profession until 1928. He also worked briefly as a kanungo (1914-1917) in the Settlement Department. He joined University of Dhaka, now in Bangladesh as a lecturer in the Bengali and Sanskrit Department in 1928 and retired from there in 1944.[1] His present house is in a state of ruin at Chongarbon.

Writing career[edit]

Mohitlal Majumder made his literary debut through the journal "Manasi". Later, he contributed regularly to journals such as the Bharati and Shanibarer Chithi. His early poems, written in pleasing rhythms, reflect the aspirations and sorrows of a dreaming youth. Acquainted with Arabic and Persian, he used Arabic and Persian words in his poems. In pre-Nazrul era, he was the user of Arabic and Persian words. His poems are inspired by both aestheticism and spiritualism.[1]

Mohitlal early poems reveal the influence of Rabindranath Tagore, but later, as a member of the Shanibarer Chithi group, he distanced himself from the older poet.

As a literary critic, Mohitlal attempted to set standards and reveal the problems of art and literature. His psychological and poet-like approach greatly elevated the status of criticism. In writing critiques he used a number of pseudonyms such as Krittivas Ojha, Sabyasachi and Sri Satyasundar Das.

His literary works were included in the curriculum of school level, secondary, higher secondary and graduation level Bengali Literature in Bangladesh. Swapan Pasari (1921), Smargaral (1936), Adhunik Bangla Sahitya (1936), Bangla Kavitar Chhanda (1945), Kavi Shri Madhusudan (1947), Sahitya Bichar (1947), Bangla O Bangali (1951), and Kavi Rabindra O Rabindrakavya (1st Vol. 1952, 2nd Vol. 1953).[1]

Poetry[edit]

  • Swapan Pasari [pushpo jibon] [1921]
  • Bishorini
  • Smar Garal [1936]
  • Hemanta Godhuli
  • Robi pradakshin

Essays[edit]

  • Adhunik Bangla Sahitya [1936]
  • Kobi Sri Madhusudan [1947]
  • Sahitya Bichar [1947]
  • Sahitya katha[1938]
  • Bichitra katha[1941]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Rahman, Bilkis (2012). "Majumder, Mohitlal". In Islam, Sirajul; Jamal, Ahmed A. Banglapedia: National Encyclopedia of Bangladesh (Second ed.). Asiatic Society of Bangladesh. 
  • Golpo Songroho (Collected Stories), the national textbook of B.A. (pass and subsidiary) course of Bangladesh, published by University of Dhaka in 1979 (reprint in 1986).
  • Bangla Sahitya (Bengali Literature), the national textbook of intermediate (college) level of Bangladesh published in 1996 by all educational boards.