Moho (Anime Studio)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Moho (Anime Studio)
Moho.png
Developer(s) Smith Micro Software
Stable release
12.3.0.22035 / September 8, 2017; 12 months ago (2017-09-08)
Operating system Microsoft Windows, Mac OS X
Type Animation software
License Trialware
Website my.smithmicro.com/anime-studio-2D-animation-software.html

Moho is a proprietary vector-based 2D animation software distributed by Smith Micro Software. Moho, (formerly known as Anime Studio), was originally distributed by LostMarble, and then by e frontier. Smith Micro Software has distributed Anime Studio since November 2007.[1] The software comes in two different versions, Moho Debut and Moho Pro. The first being restricted in terms of length and image size, as well as not containing all of the functions of the Pro version. Anime Studio is available for Windows and Macintosh operating systems in English, German, Japanese and Spanish (Since version 9.2). Moho Pro no longer supports the Linux platform.

History[edit]

The software was originally developed under the name "Moho" in 1999 by Mike Clifton at LostMarble. Moho version 5.4 was identical with the first release of Anime Studio Pro in 2006. In 2012, version 9.x was released. In 2016, version 12.0 was released under the name Moho.

LostMarble is the home of Papagayo, a free lip sync software which works with Anime Studio. LostMarble is also home to the Anime Studio forums. On Wed June 9, 2010, Smith Micro released Anime Studio 7, which added features such as Physics, 3D creation, and an improved interface. Approximately one year later, on Wed June 8, 2011, Smith Micro released Anime Studio 8, which added features such as the Character Wizard, layered Photoshop import, and real-time media connection. The first major update of Anime Studio 8, version 8.1, also supported the new Poser 9 SDK and integrated the Wacom Multi-touch API. The latter feature made Anime Studio 8.1 the first graphics based software product to work natively with Wacom's Multi-touch Wacom Bamboo and Wacom Intuos tablets. On Monday, September 10, 2012, Smith Micro released Anime Studio 9. All of the new features developed for Anime Studio 9 were in response to the growing needs and requests of its professional users. New features include Smart Bones, Editable Motion Graphs and Bézier handles, as well as major enhancements to the timeline, key frames and onionskins. On Tuesday August 13, 2013, Smith Micro released Anime Studio Pro 9.5, an upgraded version for Anime Studio 9 containing improvements and enhancements to its predecessor. In December 2014, Anime Studio 10 was released. This version contained upgraded features and new mechanics to its predecessor.

More recently the technology has been adapted to work on the iPhone and iPad in the form of an application called Sock Puppets. While the functionality is similar in that the objects on screen can lip-synch and can be animated through changes in screen position and resizing, the core of the Anime Studio functionality is not implemented. This is however, an expansion of the application into more areas and styles of animation. In 2015 Anime Studio 11 was introduced. This release contained upgraded features such as Frame-by-Frame animation, Layer Referencing, Animated Shape Ordering, Enhanced Tools and Brushes, JSON File Format Support and much more.

In 2016, Anime Studio was renamed Moho by Smith Micro Software in order the reflect the software's ability to do more than just Anime. The 2016 release of Moho 12.0 included additional features such as pin bones, optimized Bézier handles, improved free hand tools, smart warp, real motion blur, and more.[2] Moho Pro 12 was released in August 2016. In October 2016, Moho became available for the Microsoft Surface Studio. The functionality of the Surface Dial is also incorporated with Moho as Smith Micro worked with Microsoft to develop unique Moho functionality specifically for the Surface Dial peripheral. This feature set enables users to create complex animations more quickly and easily through functions such as a new overlay timeline, rigged characters, rotating canvases and frame-by-frame animation.

Version Release Date Publisher Improvements/ Features
1.0 1999 LostMarble Initial Release
5.6 2006 LostMarble Introduction of lip-synching, flash output, improved text and illustrator import and improved Vector drawing tools
7.0 2010 Smith Micro Physics, 3D creation, and an improved interface
8.1 2011 Smith Micro Supports character wizard, layered Photoshop import, and real-time media connection. This update also supported the new Poser 9 SDK and integrated the Wacom Multi-touch API
9.0 2012 Smith Micro Features include Smart Bones, Editable Motion Graphs and Bézier handles, enhancements to the timeline, key frames and onionskins.
9.5 2013 Smith Micro Smart Bones enhancements now provide you even more power and precision. Nested Layer controls give you more hierarchical control over your rigs. Flexi-binding provides maximum flexibility by isolating the influence of bones. Depth shifting helps preserve the size of objects. Other Style improvements include viewing of real-time changes on the canvas, switch layer enhancements and more to improve your workflow.
10.0 2014 Smith Micro Updated content library with free characters, props, scenes, enhanced drawing tools, multiple document support, combined bone tools, combined point tools, point hiding, edit multiple Layers simultaneously, and automatic updates.
11.0 2015 Smith Micro Vector-based draw, paint and fill tools, bone rigging, animation timeline, audio recording, sound effects and improved lip syncing.
12.0 2016 Smith Micro Bone-rigging, timeline, enhanced drawing tools, improved audio recording, sound effects, automatic lip-synching, beginner's mode, character wizard, automatic image tracing, path tool, motion tracking, multi-touch support, multiple document support.
12.3 2017 Smith Micro Ability to paste images from the clipboard to create new image layers, new document preferences and bug fixes.

Features[edit]

  • Moho features layers of different types for artwork as well as for grouping and switching assets. Layers can be animated in perspective.
  • Layer ordering can be animated (since v5.6)
  • Camera movements.
  • Pressure-sensitive tablets in combination with brush shapes can be used to create natural-looking strokes. Artwork created in Moho is resolution-independent.
  • The animator can create a skeleton of Bones to which pieces of artwork are attached. The skeleton works with inverse and forward kinematics and makes it easier to animate characters.
  • Tweening of all layer, vector shapes, and bone animation.
  • Physics engine to simulate reality.
  • Styles for outlines and fills.
  • Masks are possible.
  • Moho has some 3D abilities, useful for multiplane camera effects and even complex set building.
  • Moho supports auto lip synching, where an imported sound can be automatically added to a mouth to make the mouth move as if it is talking in sync with the audio.
  • Moho supports several file formats to import pictures and video. Alpha channels of PNG and video files are recognised.
  • Multiple soundtracks can be added. In combination with Papagayo Moho provides automatic lip sync.
  • Moho exports films to .swf, but without certain effects which are not part of the .swf file format. Export to video or image includes everything and can be done in any resolution. Videos can be rendered with an alpha channel.
  • Most tools are completely scriptable (in Lua (programming language)).
  • Smart Bones technology improves workflow.
  • Editable Motion Graphs with Bézier handles for more control.
  • Onionskins have been enhanced.
  • Supports layered Photoshop files.
  • Includes Timeline with keyframes.

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

References[edit]