Moisés Kaufman

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Moisés Kaufman
Born (1963-11-21) November 21, 1963 (age 55)
Caracas, Venezuela
Occupationplaywright, theatre director
NationalityAmerican
Website
www.tectonictheaterproject.org/Moises_Kaufman.html

Moisés Kaufman (born November 21, 1963) is a Venezuelan playwright, director and founder of Tectonic Theater Project, based in New York City. He is best known for writing and producing The Laramie Project (2000) with other members of Tectonic Theater Project, which he founded. He is the author of numerous plays, including Gross Indecency: The Three Trials of Oscar Wilde and 33 Variations.

Born and raised in Caracas, Venezuela, he moved as a young man to New York City in 1987.[1]

Biography[edit]

Kaufman is of Romanian and Ukrainian Jewish descent, and was born in Caracas, Venezuela.[2] He is an alumnus of Venezuela's Universidad Metropolitana, where he began to study theatre.[3] After immigrating to the United States, he went to college in New York and graduated from NYU.[4]

In 2005 he described himself in an interview by saying, "I am Venezuelan, I am Jewish, I am gay, I live in New York. I am the sum of all my cultures. I couldn't write anything that didn't incorporate all that I am."[5]

Kaufman was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship in 2002, following the premiere of The Laramie Project, which was based on extensive interviews with residents and commentators in and around Wyoming who were involved with the aftermath of the murder of gay student Matthew Shepard.[6]

He made his Broadway directing debut in the 2004 production of I Am My Own Wife by Doug Wright, for which he received a Tony Award nomination for Best Direction of a Play.

On September 22, 2016, Kaufman was awarded the National Medal of Arts and Humanities in a ceremony conducted by U.S. president Barack Obama. He is the first Venezuelan to receive the honor.[4]

Awards[edit]

Stage directing credits[edit]

Film credits[edit]

Television credits[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hurwitt, Robert (2001-05-20). "The 'Laramie' process". San Francisco Chronicle.
  2. ^ Robert Myers (25 May 1997). "'Nothing Mega About It Except the Applause'". The New York Times. Retrieved 6 July 2009.
  3. ^ [1]
  4. ^ a b [2]
  5. ^ Orozco, Jose (March 21, 2005). "True To Reality: An Interview with Moises Kaufman". Morphizm. Retrieved 6 August 2012. I am Venezuelan, I am Jewish, I am gay, I live in New York. I am the sum of all my cultures. I couldn't write anything that didn't incorporate all that I am.
  6. ^ "Moisés Kaufman". John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. 2002. Archived from the original on 2011-06-22. Retrieved 2009-03-03.

External links[edit]

See also[edit]