Moline, Kansas

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Moline, Kansas
City
Location within Elk County and Kansas
Location within Elk County and Kansas
KDOT map of Elk County (legend)
KDOT map of Elk County (legend)
Coordinates: 37°21′50″N 96°18′8″W / 37.36389°N 96.30222°W / 37.36389; -96.30222Coordinates: 37°21′50″N 96°18′8″W / 37.36389°N 96.30222°W / 37.36389; -96.30222
Country United States
State Kansas
County Elk
Government
 • Type Mayor–Council
Area[1]
 • Total 0.35 sq mi (0.91 km2)
 • Land 0.35 sq mi (0.91 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation 1,053 ft (321 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total 371
 • Estimate (2015)[3] 332
 • Density 1,100/sq mi (410/km2)
Time zone CST (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code 67353
Area code 620
FIPS code 20-47600[4]
GNIS feature ID 0469874[5]
Website molinekansas.com

Moline is a city in Elk County, Kansas, United States. As of the 2010 census, the city population was 371.[6] Moline is located in south central Elk County at the intersection of U.S. Highway 160 and K-99.

Moline is well known for being the home of Kansas' oldest swinging (suspension-type) bridge, built in 1904.[7] The bridge spans over a lower portion of a local stream, Wildcat Creek. Immediately to the west of the famous Swinging Bridge, a limestone water fall formation flows with water through much of the rainy season in late winter and early spring.[8]

History[edit]

Moline is located on a slightly elevated plateau in the valley of Wildcat Creek, named so by the indigenous Native Americans because of the prominent number of wildcats (Bobcats) that lived along the stream. In early 1879 as the Santa Fe Railway extended westward from Independence, Missouri, towns sprung up vigorously along the line.[9] The Land and Town Company chartered the land for the city on July 21, 1879 and laid out the town.[10] The name Moline was decided upon at the suggestion of Mr. J.F. Chapman, of the original town company, who came from the area of Moline, Illinois, and because the farmers in the area largely used the Moline plow.[11]

The first post office in Moline was established in September, 1879.[12]

Geography[edit]

Moline is located at 37°21′50″N 96°18′8″W / 37.36389°N 96.30222°W / 37.36389; -96.30222 (37.363769, -96.302086).[13] According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 0.35 square miles (0.91 km2), all of it land.[1]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880 79
1890 527 567.1%
1900 695 31.9%
1910 808 16.3%
1920 950 17.6%
1930 897 −5.6%
1940 870 −3.0%
1950 871 0.1%
1960 698 −19.9%
1970 555 −20.5%
1980 553 −0.4%
1990 473 −14.5%
2000 457 −3.4%
2010 371 −18.8%
Est. 2015 332 [3] −10.5%
U.S. Decennial Census

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 371 people, 177 households, and 95 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,060.0 inhabitants per square mile (409.3/km2). There were 229 housing units at an average density of 654.3 per square mile (252.6/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 94.9% White, 0.8% Native American, 0.3% Asian, 1.1% from other races, and 3.0% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5.1% of the population.

There were 177 households of which 20.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 41.2% were married couples living together, 7.3% had a female householder with no husband present, 5.1% had a male householder with no wife present, and 46.3% were non-families. 40.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 22.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.10 and the average family size was 2.76.

The median age in the city was 48.8 years. 18.3% of residents were under the age of 18; 6.4% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 21% were from 25 to 44; 28.6% were from 45 to 64; and 25.6% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 49.3% male and 50.7% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[4] of 2000, there were 457 people, 211 households, and 116 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,318.6 people per square mile (504.1/km²). There were 255 housing units at an average density of 735.8 per square mile (281.3/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 93.65% White, 0.44% African American, 0.66% Native American, 3.06% from other races, and 2.19% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.94% of the population.

There were 211 households out of which 17.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 47.4% were married couples living together, 6.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 45.0% were non-families. 42.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 28.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.00 and the average family size was 2.75.

In the city, the population was spread out with 17.7% under the age of 18, 5.0% from 18 to 24, 17.7% from 25 to 44, 21.9% from 45 to 64, and 37.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 55 years. For every 100 females there were 84.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 79.0 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $22,143, and the median income for a family was $31,667. Males had a median income of $27,750 versus $14,792 for females. The per capita income for the city was $14,076. About 16.7% of families and 28.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 55.6% of those under age 18 and 12.1% of those age 65 or over.

Education[edit]

Moline is served by USD 282 West Elk Schools. School unification consolidated Moline, Howard and Severy schools forming USD 282. West Elk High School is located in Howard. The West Elk High School mascot is Patriots.[14]

Moline High School closed through school unification. The Moline High School mascot was Hornets.[15]

Museums[edit]

Shaffer House Museum and Art Center[edit]

Moline is home to the historic Shaffer House Museum and Art Center. It is located at the corner of 2nd and Plum Streets, and is a three-story building which was originally a rooming house, it was later converted to a doctor's office and hospital run by Dr. C.E. Shaffer. The Shaffer Museum is operated by a group of local volunteer citizens and is open May through August from 9 A.M. to 12 P.M. on Wednesdays and Saturdays. Admission to the facility is free of charge. The Shaffer Museum features historical exhibits of an early 1900s kitchen and bedroom, a 1917 photographer's studio, 20th century medical equipment, many local antique farming tools, and mementos from the Ames Chevrolet dealership, which was located in Moline, KS and before closing due to fire was considered the oldest continuously operating family owned Chevrolet dealership in the United States. The museum also contains historically significant items from local schools including Moline High School which is no longer in operation. In addition, the museum features artifacts including articles and photographs of one of the United States' great World War II aviation heroes, General Leon Johnson, who spent most of his childhood in Moline.[8]

Community Festivals and Events[edit]

Moline Crazy Days[edit]

Crazy Days,[8] as it's referred to locally, is a Moline festival event open completely to the public and is always held the during the last full weekend of June at the Griffin City Park. The event starts off Friday evening with a "bean feed" consisting of ham and beans, cornbread, and all the fixings. After the bean feed, a baked-goods benefit auction is held at the same location with the proceeds used to make improvements and repairs to the local Moline infrastructure. Saturday morning the day kicks off with a community parade which usually consists of local law enforcement, ambulances, fire fighters, cowboys and cowgirls on their horses, farmers on their tractors, children in wagons and on bicycles, teens on ATV's, and a variety of unique floats created by local organizations and businesses, all of whom throw candy to youngsters lined up on each side of the main street. After the parade, there are many events at the Griffin Park. Local talents provide music for the crowd, and hamburgers are served by the local chapter of the Elk County Cattlewoman's Association.[16] The festival commences with music and games until the evening when the sun goes down. Once it's dark, a fireworks display is put on in the field adjacent to Griffin Park and the event is concluded.

Elk County Rodeo[edit]

Among one of the most popular events held in Moline each year is the annual Elk County Rodeo,[17] held on July 3 and 4 at the Elk County Rodeo Grounds, located at the Junction of US-160 and K-99. The rodeo begins each night with a patriotic local tradition displaying a flag that is carried around the arena by a local cowboy as Johnny Cash's "Ragged Old Flag" is played in remembrance of the fight for America's independence and freedom. The first event is mutton busting for the youth, and then is followed by the usual array of rodeo events including calf roping, bareback and saddle bronc riding, barrel racing, and the most popular, bull riding. The second night is a repeat of the first, except following the rodeo there is a fireworks display, which is followed by a concert and dance.

Recreation[edit]

Moline New City Lake (North)[edit]

Moline New City Lake is located in the scenic Osage Questas region in southeast Kansas just one mile north of Moline. Native tall grass prairie comprises most of the lake's 4,742 acre drainage basin and helps maintain the average 36 inches of water transparency. The lake is located one and one-half miles north of the city of Moline. Construction of the lake was completed on February 18, 1983 for the purposes of flood control, civic water supply, and recreation. The city of Moline still uses the lake as its primary water supply. The 185 acre lake is surrounded by 257 acres of city owned and managed property. Improvements at the lake include a paved boat ramp, boat loading dock, five shelter houses, handicapped accessible outhouse, five earthen and rip-rapped fishing piers.[citation needed]

Moline Old City Lake (South)[edit]

Moline Old City Lake is located in the scenic Osage Questas region in southeast Kansas approximately one mile west of moline on U.S. Highway 160, one mile south on Road 12, and one-half mile west on Cyclone Road. Native tall grass prairie comprises most of the lake's 5,760 acre drainage basin and this combined with the aquatic vegetation helps to maintain 42 inches of water transparency. The lake is located two miles west and one-half mile south of the city of Moline. The Works Progress Administration completed construction of the lake in 1937 for the purposes of flood control, civic water supply, and recreation. The city of Moline no longer uses the lake for potable water supply. The 65 acre lake is surrounded by 85 acres of city owned and managed property. Improvements at the lake include a concrete boat ramp, shelter house, ADA approved outhouse, and picnic tables.[citation needed]

Notable people[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-07-06. 
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-07-06. 
  3. ^ a b "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2015". Retrieved July 2, 2016. 
  4. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  5. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  6. ^ "2010 City Population and Housing Occupancy Status". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved June 18, 2011. 
  7. ^ http://kansastravel.org/molineswingingbridge.htm
  8. ^ a b c http://www.skyways.org/kansas/towns/Moline/index.html
  9. ^ Mann, Henrietta. A Brief Historical Sketch of the Settlements of Elk County (Pittsburg: Master's Thesis, Kansas State Teachers College, 1940).
  10. ^ *Rydjord, John (1972). Kansas Place-Names. University of Oklahoma Press, Norman, Oklahoma. p. 282. ISBN 0-8061-0994-7.
  11. ^ "Transactions of the Kansas State Historical Society: 1901-1902, Together with Addresses at Annual Meetings, Memorials, and Miscellaneous Papers." Vol. VII, Topeka: W.Y. Morgan, State Printer 1902.
  12. ^ "Kansas Post Offices, 1828-1961 (archived)". Kansas Historical Society. Archived from the original on October 9, 2013. Retrieved 8 June 2014. 
  13. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  14. ^ "West Elk Schools". USD 282. Retrieved 4 January 2017. 
  15. ^ "1957 MOLINE HIGH SCHOOL YEARBOOK - Moline, KS". classmates. Retrieved 7 January 2017. 
  16. ^ http://users.pld.com/millerfy/Elk%20County%20Cattle%20Women.htm
  17. ^ https://www.facebook.com/ElkCountyRodeoMolineKS

External links[edit]

City
Schools
Maps