Moncton Northwest (electoral district)

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Moncton Northwest
New Brunswick electoral district
Moncton Northwest (2014-).png
The riding of Moncton Northwest in relation to other southeastern New Brunswick electoral districts
Provincial electoral district
Legislature Legislative Assembly of New Brunswick
MLA
 
 
 
Ernie Steeves
Progressive Conservative
District created 1994
First contested 1995
Last contested 2014
Demographics
Population (2011) 15,669
Electors (2013) 11,067
Census divisions Westmorland
Census subdivisions Moncton

Moncton Northwest is a provincial electoral district for the Legislative Assembly of New Brunswick, Canada. It was first be contested in the 1995 general election, having been created in the 1994 redistribution of electoral boundaries with the name Moncton Crescent.

The district was first created in 1995 out of Petitcodiac, then the most populous electoral district in the province. It took its name from the fact that its shape was a crescent over the north of the city of Moncton. It lost much of its eastern most territory in the 2006 redistribution and lost much of its crescent shape. It lost more territory in 2013 but gained parts of Petitcodiac and was renamed Moncton Northwest.

Members of the Legislative Assembly[edit]

Assembly Years Member Party
Moncton Crescent
Riding created from Petitcodiac
53rd  1995–1999     Ken MacLeod Liberal
54th  1999–2003     John Betts Progressive Conservative
55th  2003–2006
56th  2006–2010
57th  2010–2014
Moncton Northwest
58th  2014–Present     Ernie Steeves Progressive Conservative

Election results[edit]

Moncton Northwest[edit]

New Brunswick general election, 2014
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Progressive Conservative Ernie Steeves 3,012 42.15 -8.41
Liberal Brian Hicks 2,773 38.80 +7.99
New Democratic Jason Purdy 783 10.96 +1.18
Green Mike Milligan 436 6.10 -2.74
People's Alliance Carl Bainbridge 142 1.99
Total valid votes 7,146 100.0  
Total rejected ballots 25 0.35
Turnout 7,171 59.57
Eligible voters 12,038
Progressive Conservative notional hold Swing -8.20
Source: Elections New Brunswick[1]

Moncton Crescent[edit]

New Brunswick general election, 2010
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Progressive Conservative John Betts 4,168 50.56 -3.97
Liberal Russ Mallard 2,540 30.81 -11.04
New Democratic Syp Okana 806 9.78 +6.17
Green Mike Milligan 729 8.84
Total valid votes 8,243
Total rejected ballots 51 0.61
Turnout 8,294 61.36
Eligible voters 13,517
Progressive Conservative hold Swing +3.54
Source: Elections New Brunswick[2]
New Brunswick general election, 2006
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Progressive Conservative John Betts 4,271 54.53 +5.54
Liberal Shirley Smallwood 3,278 41.85 -1.88
New Democratic Ian Thorn 283 3.61 -3.66
Total valid votes 7,832
Progressive Conservative hold Swing +3.71
[3]
New Brunswick general election, 2003
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Progressive Conservative John Betts 4,230 48.99 -12.54
Liberal Ray Goudreau 3,776 43.73 +15.26
New Democratic Richard Goulding 628 7.27 -1.64
Total valid votes 8,634 100.0  
Progressive Conservative hold Swing -13.90
New Brunswick general election, 1999
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Progressive Conservative John Betts 4,825 61.53 +40.23
Liberal Kenneth R. MacLeod 2,233 28.47 -26.34
New Democratic Carl Fowler 699 8.91 +2.82
Confederation of Regions Albert H. Wood 85 1.08 -13.47
Total valid votes 7,842 100.0  
Progressive Conservative gain from Liberal Swing +33.28
New Brunswick general election, 1995
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Liberal Ken MacLeod 3,832 54.81
Progressive Conservative Barbara Winsor 1,489 21.30
Confederation of Regions Dean Ryder 1,017 14.55
New Democratic Richard Hay 426 6.09
Independent Richard Mullins 227 3.25
Total valid votes 6,991 100.0  
Liberal notional gain Swing  

References[edit]

  1. ^ Elections New Brunswick (6 Oct 2014). "Declared Results, 2014 New Brunswick election". Retrieved 15 Oct 2014. 
  2. ^ "Thirty-seventh General Election - Report of the Chief Electoral Officer" (PDF). Elections New Brunswick. 27 September 2010. Retrieved 1 January 2015. 
  3. ^ New Brunswick Votes 2006. Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved May 22, 2009.

External links[edit]