Mondele

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Mondele or Mundele (pl. mindele) is a Bobangi term meaning "white" (white man, not the color, mpembe) European-style person, person with light skin color. The words were originally used to describe Belgian and French colonists, but can be used to describe any light-skinned non-African.

The word can also be applied even to black Africans with a much lighter skin complexion, Coloureds, foreign-raised locals speaking with foreign accents, visiting expatriates, or westernised blacks (including African Americans), who are referred to specifically as mundele ndombe.

Étymology[edit]

The term originated from the Bangi language.

See also[edit]

In Ghana the word used for a 'white' person or foreigner is ‘Obroni’ in the local languages, those of the Akan family.

In Nigeria, the word used for a 'white' person is Oyibo.

In Uganda, the word used for a white or foreign person is 'mzungu'.

In Togo and Benin, the word used for a white person is 'yovo'.

In Central and West Africa (most frequently in the Gambia, Senegal, and Mali, also in Ivory Coast) the word used for a 'white' person is 'Toubab'.

References[edit]

Alleyne, Mervyn. The Construction and Representation of Race and Ethnicity in the Caribbean and the World. University of the West Indies Press. p. 280. ISBN 978-9766401795.