Monotype Grotesque

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MonotypeGrotesqueSP.png
Category Sans-serif
Classification Realist sans-serif
Designer(s) Frank Hinman Pierpont
Foundry Monotype Corporation
Date released 1926
Re-issuing foundries Stephenson Blake, Adobe Type, Linotype

Monotype Grotesque is a family of realist sans-serif typefaces created by Frank Hinman Pierpont (1860–1937) and released by the Monotype foundry in or by 1926.

History and design[edit]

Monotype Grotesque is a large family of fonts, including very bold, condensed and extended designs. Like many early sans-serif designs, it is strongly irregular, with designs created at different times that are adapted to suit each width and style at the expense of consistency.[1][2][3] Monotype executive Dan Rhatigan has commented that it "was never really conceived as a family in the first place, so consistency wasn't a goal."[4]

Pierpont based aspects of the design on Ideal, an earlier more idiosyncratic sans-serif by the H. Berthold AG foundry, and William Thorowgood's 1832 face titled "Grotesque." Uppercase characters are of near equal width, the G has a spur in some weights, and the M in the non-condensed weights is square. The lowercase characters a, e, g, and t follow the model of twentieth-century English romans.

Monotype Grotesque was somewhat overshadowed during the period immediately after its release, due to the arrival of Futura and Gill Sans. With their cleaner, more constructed and geometric appearance, these designs came to define graphic design of the 1930s, especially in Britain and parts of Europe. However, while it never achieved the popularity of Akzidenz Grotesk, it remained a steady seller through the twentieth century with a revival of interest after the war, and is often found in avant-garde printing of this period from western and central Europe.[5]

With the rise of popularity of neo-grotesque sans-serif typefaces such as Helvetica in the 1950s, which featured a more homogeneous design across a range of styles, Monotype attempted to redesign Monotype Grotesque around 1956 under the name of 'New Grotesque' in a more contemporary style. The project proved abortive, and did not progress beyond the release of some alternative characters.[6][7][8][9][10]

Monotype would later use aspects of Monotype Grotesque and New Grotesque as an inspiration for Arial, a new design styled to generally be very similar to Helvetica.

Digital releases[edit]

Monotype Grotesque Display[edit]

It is a variant with altered designs. The family consists of Bold Condensed and Bold Extended fonts.

Digital version was sold by Linotype.

Adobe version[edit]

This version consists only fonts not in the Monotype Grotesque Display family.

Classic Grotesque[edit]

It is a variant designed by Rod McDonald. The design combines the features in Venus and Ideal Grotesk font families. Alternate characters are also added.[11][12] The development was originally approved in 2008, and lasted four years.[13][14]

The font family includes 14 fonts in 7 weights and one width, with a complementary italic. OpenType features include numerators/denominators, fractions, ligatures, lining/old style/proportional and tabular figures, superscript, small capitals, stylistic alternates, stylistic sets 1 and 2 (Roman fonts only).

OpenType Pro version supports all western European, most central European and many eastern European languages.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Coles, Stephen. "Helvetica and alternatives". FontFeed. Retrieved 2 July 2015. 
  2. ^ Hoefler & Frere-Jones. "Knockout". Hoefler & Frere-Jones. Retrieved 1 July 2015. 
  3. ^ Hoefler & Frere-Jones. "Knockout sizes". Hoefler & Frere-Jones. 
  4. ^ Rhatigan, Dan. "Twitter post". Twitter. 
  5. ^ Ecob, Alexander. "Monotype Grotesque". Eye magazine. Retrieved 1 July 2015. 
  6. ^ Shaw, Paul. "Arial Addendum no. 3". Blue Pencil. Retrieved 1 July 2015. 
  7. ^ Shaw (& Nicholas). "Arial addendum no. 4". Blue Pencil. Retrieved 1 July 2015. 
  8. ^ McDonald, Rob. "Some history about Arial". Paul Shaw Letter Design. Retrieved 22 May 2015. 
  9. ^ Haley, Allan (May–June 2007). "Is Arial Dead Yet?". Step Inside Design. Retrieved 2011-05-11. 
  10. ^ "Type Designer Showcase: Robin Nicholas – Arial". Monotype Imaging. Retrieved 2011-05-10. 
  11. ^ U&lc Volume 23 Introducing Classic Grotesque
  12. ^ Monotype Imaging Announces the Classic Grotesque Typeface Family
  13. ^ Classic Grotesque by Rod McDonald: a traditional font with a modern face
  14. ^ Classic Grotesque – eine traditionelle Schrift in neuem Gewand – 19. September 2012 - Neue Linotype-Schrift mit umfangreichem Zeichenausbau
  • Friedl, Frederich, Nicholas Ott and Bernard Stein. Typography: An Encyclopedic Survey of Type Design and Techniques Through History. Black Dog & Leventhal: 1998. ISBN 1-57912-023-7.
  • Jaspert, Berry and Johnson. Encyclopaedia of Type Faces. Cassell Paperback, London; 2001. ISBN 1-84188-139-2
  • Macmillan, Neil. An A–Z of Type Designers. Yale University Press: 2006. ISBN 0-300-11151-7.

External links[edit]

Classic Grotesque[edit]