Montenegrin Americans

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Montenegrin Americans
Црногорски Американци
Crnogorski Amerikanci
Total population
c. 2,528 (2000)[1]
24,112 (Montenegrin-born, 2013)[2]
Regions with significant populations
Alaska, Illinois, New York
Languages
English, Montenegrin
Religion
Montenegrin Orthodox, Roman Catholic, Islam
Related ethnic groups
other South Slavs

Montenegrin Americans are Americans who are of Montenegrin origin. Also, the term "Yugoslavian American" may be preferred by people who identify with the former nation of Yugoslavia before its breakup during the early 1990s, and in 2006, Montenegro became independent from the State Union with Serbia.

Concentrations[edit]

Today, these Montenegrins mainly live in the central and eastern United States, much of which is concentrated in New York City and Chicago, and to a lesser extent in Detroit, and recent arrivals from former Yugoslavia in the Los Angeles area.

Montenegrin Americans are found throughout the state of Alaska. About a quarter of all known Montenegrin Americans live in Anchorage. Their presence in Alaska dates back to the gold rushes of the early 20th century. A short-lived newspaper entitled Servian Montenegrin was established at the beginning of 1905 in the town of Douglas, near Juneau.[3]

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Notable Montenegrin Americans[edit]

Literature[edit]

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Politics[edit]

Sports[edit]

Other[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Table 1. First, Second, and Total Responses to the Ancestry Question by Detailed Ancestry Code: 2000". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved December 2, 2010. 
  2. ^ "Unicef: MIGRATION PROFILES, 2013" (PDF). Unicef. 
  3. ^ Nicolson, Mary C.; Slemmons, Mary Anne (1998). Alaska Newspapers On Microfilm, 1866-1998. Fairbanks/Juneau: University of Alaska Fairbanks/Alaska State Library. pp. 63–64. 

External links[edit]