Montenegro in the Eurovision Song Contest

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Montenegro
Serbia and Montenegro
Montenegro
Member stationRadio and Television of Montenegro (RTCG)
National selection events
Participation summary
Appearances11 (2 finals)
First appearance2007
Last appearance2019
Best result13th: 2015
External links
RTCG page
Montenegro's page at Eurovision.tv
Song contest current event.png For the most recent participation see
Montenegro in the Eurovision Song Contest 2019

Montenegro has participated in the Eurovision Song Contest 11 times. The country debuted in 2007. Previously it had participated as part of Yugoslavia (both the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia from 1961 to 1991 and the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia in 1992) and as part of Serbia and Montenegro (from 2004 to 2006).

The 2005 entrants from Serbia and Montenegro, No Name, were from Montenegro, as were the 1983 and 1984 entrants for Yugoslavia.

History[edit]

As of 2020, Montenegro has taken part in the Eurovision Song Contest 11 times since debuting in 2007, and has qualified for the final twice. Before Montenegro became an independent country on 3 June 2006, the country had participated as part of Yugoslavia and later Serbia and Montenegro. Entries from Montenegro also placed 4th in 1983 and 18th in 1984 as part of Yugoslavia, and 7th in 2005 as part of Serbia and Montenegro. Montenegrin broadcaster Radio and Television of Montenegro (RTCG) organised the national final MontenegroSong to select the country's entries in 2007 and 2008, and internally selected the entry in 2009.

As an independent country, Montenegro failed to qualify for the grand final during its debut in 2007, as well as its appearances in 2008 and 2009. The country placed 11th in the first semi-final in 2009, their best result at the time, with "Just Get Out of My Life" performed by Andrea Demirović. In November 2009, RTCG announced that Montenegro would withdraw from the 2010 contest due to financial difficulties.[1] Despite not participating, RTCG still broadcast the contest.[citation needed] RTCG applied to participate in the 2011 contest, but with the caveat that the potential representative would have to find sponsors to fund their participation themselves.[2] As that did not come to fruition, in December 2010, Montenegro decided to not participate in the contest on financial grounds.[3]

On 20 November 2011 the head of RTCG revealed that Montenegro would participate in the 2012 contest to be held in Baku; he also went on to say that he saw Montenegro at every Eurovision Song Contest to come.[4] Montenegro returned to the contest in 2012, again internally selecting their entry, "Euro Neuro" performed by Rambo Amadeus, which failed to qualify from the first semi-final. In 2014, Montenegro qualified for the grand final for the first time in its history with Sergej Ćetković's "Moj svijet". In 2015, Montenegro again qualified for the grand final with "Adio", performed by Knez and composed by Željko Joksimović. The song achieved the best Montenegrin result up to that time, finishing in 13th place. In 2016, RTCG selected Highway and their song "The Real Thing" internally. They performed in the first semi-final but the song failed to qualify, placing 13th with 60 points. In 2017, RTCG selected Slavko Kalezić and his song "Space" internally. The song failed to qualify, placing 16th. In 2018, RTCG organised the national final Montevizija to select their entry,[5] which was won by "Inje" performed by Vanja Radovanović.[6] The song failed to qualify from the second semi-final, placing 16th with 40 points. In 2019, RTCG again selected its representative through Montevizija,[7] which was won by "Heaven" performed by D mol.[8] The song failed to qualify from the first semi-final, placing 16th with 46 points.

Despite initially confirming their participation in the 2020 contest and aiming to expand Montevizija,[9][10] Montenegro ultimately did not enter the contest, which was later cancelled as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.[11] RTCG later stated that the reason was due to "modest results" and financial issues.[12]

Contestants[edit]

Year Artist Language Title Final Points Semi Points
Stevan Faddy Montenegrin "'Ajde, kroči" ('Ајде, крочи) Failed to qualify 22 33
Stefan Filipović Montenegrin "Zauvijek volim te" (Заувијек волим те) 14 23
Andrea Demirović English "Just Get Out of My Life" 11 44
Rambo Amadeus English[a] "Euro Neuro" 15 20
Who See Montenegrin "Igranka" (Игранка) 12 41
Sergej Ćetković Montenegrin "Moj svijet" (Мој свијет) 19 37 7 63
Knez Montenegrin "Adio" (Адио) 13 44 9 57
Highway English "The Real Thing" Failed to qualify 13 60
Slavko Kalezić English "Space" 16 56
Vanja Radovanović Montenegrin "Inje" (Иње) 16 40
D mol English "Heaven" 16 46

Awards[edit]

Barbara Dex Award[edit]

The Barbara Dex Award is an annually awarded, fan-voted accolade for the "worst dressed" artists in the Eurovision Song Contest.[13]

Year Performer Host city Ref.
2017 Slavko Kalezić Ukraine Kiev

Related involvement[edit]

Heads of delegation[edit]

The public broadcaster of each participating country in the Eurovision Song Contest assigns a head of delegation as the EBU's contact person and the leader of their delegation at the event. The delegation, whose size can greatly vary, includes a head of press, the contestants, songwriters, composers and backing vocalists, among others.[15]

Year Head of delegation Ref.
2017 Sabrija Vulić
2018 Nataša Baranin
2019 Sabrija Vulić

Commentators and spokespersons[edit]

Year Television Radio Spokesperson Ref.
Commentator Channel Commentator Channel
2007 Dražen Bauković, Tamara Ivanković TVCG 2 No broadcast Vidak Latković
2008 Nina Radulović
2009 Jovana Vukčević
2010 Did not participate
2011 No broadcast
2012 Dražen Bauković, Tamara Ivanković TVCG 1 Marija Marković
2013 Sonja Savović, Sanja Pejović Radio Crne Gore, Radio 98 Ivana Sebek
2014 Tijana Mišković
2015 Dražen Bauković, Tijana Mišković TVCG 2 No broadcast Andrea Demirović
2016 TVCG 1, TVCG SAT Danijel Alibabić
2017 Tijana Mišković
2018 Nataša Šotra
2019 Ajda Šufta

Gallery[edit]

See also[edit]

Notes and references[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Contains some phrases in Montenegrin and German.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hondal, Victor (2009-11-17). "Montenegro withdraws from Eurovision 2010". ESCToday. Retrieved 2009-11-17.
  2. ^ a b Hondal, Victor (4 December 2010). "Montenegro applied for Eurovision 2011". esctoday.com. Retrieved 15 November 2019.
  3. ^ Hondal, Victor (2009-12-23). "Montenegro officially out of Eurovision 2011". ESCToday. Retrieved 2009-12-23.
  4. ^ Granger, Anthony (2011-11-30). "Montenegro confirms for Baku". Eurovoix. Retrieved 30 November 2011.
  5. ^ Herbert, Emily (18 October 2017). "Montenegro: National Final To Select Eurovision 2018 Participant". eurovoix.com. Retrieved 15 November 2019.
  6. ^ Herbert, Emily (17 February 2018). "Montenegro: Vanja Radovanović to Eurovision 2018". eurovoix.com. Retrieved 15 November 2019.
  7. ^ Granger, Anthony (31 October 2018). "Montenegro: Public Will Select Eurovision 2019 Entry". eurovoix.com. Retrieved 15 November 2019.
  8. ^ Granger, Anthony (9 February 2019). "Montenegro: D-Moll Selected For Eurovision Song Contest 2019". eurovoix.com. Retrieved 15 November 2019.
  9. ^ a b Farren, Neil (24 September 2019). "Montenegro: Eurovision 2020 Participation Confirmed". eurovoix.com. Retrieved 14 November 2019.
  10. ^ Granger, Anthony (12 May 2019). "Montenegro: Aims For Expanded Montevizija in 2020". eurovoix.com. Retrieved 14 November 2019.
  11. ^ Herbert, Emily (13 November 2019). "41 Countries Will Participate in The Eurovision Song Contest 2020". eurovoix.com. Retrieved 14 November 2019.
  12. ^ Jiandani, Sanjay (15 November 2019). "Montenegro: RTCG releases a statement regarding its Eurovision withdrawal". esctoday.com.
  13. ^ Backer, Stina (25 May 2012). "Forgettable song, memorable outfit: The crazy clothes of Eurovision". CNN. Archived from the original on 27 May 2018. Retrieved 26 May 2018.
  14. ^ Adams, William Lee (21 May 2017). "Eurovision's worst dressed? Montenegro's Slavko Kalezic wins Barbara Dex Award 2017". Wiwibloggs. Retrieved 8 December 2019.
  15. ^ "Heads of Delegation". European Broadcasting Union. Retrieved 27 May 2019.
  16. ^ a b Granger, Anthony (21 January 2018). "Montenegro: Nataša Baranin New Head of Delegation". eurovoix.com. Retrieved 6 December 2019.
  17. ^ Viniker, Barry (12 March 2007). "The voting running order revealed". esctoday.com. Archived from the original on 14 March 2007. Retrieved 16 November 2019.
  18. ^ "Sumnja od Jugolasvenskog glasanja". evropesma.org. Archived from the original on 8 April 2012. Retrieved 16 November 2019.
  19. ^ "Sumnja od Jugolasvenskog glasanja". evropesma.org. 8 September 2011. Archived from the original on 8 April 2012. Retrieved 16 November 2019.
  20. ^ "Running order for the voting tonight". eurovision.tv. EBU. 26 May 2012. Archived from the original on 18 June 2012.
  21. ^ a b Vučinić, Nada (14 May 2013). "Večernji program" [Evening program] (in Montenegrin). RTCG. Archived from the original on 2 May 2013. Retrieved 16 November 2019.
  22. ^ Roxburgh, Gordon (18 May 2013). ""Good evening Malmö" - Voting order revealed". eurovision.tv. EBU. Archived from the original on 19 May 2013. Retrieved 16 November 2019.
  23. ^ Roxburgh, Gordon (10 May 2014). ""Good evening Copenhagen" - Voting order revealed". eurovision.tv. EBU. Archived from the original on 13 May 2014. Retrieved 16 November 2019.
  24. ^ "Eurosong". TVCG. 22 May 2015. Retrieved 16 November 2019.
  25. ^ Roxburgh, Gordon (23 May 2015). ""Good evening Vienna" – Voting order revealed". Eurovision Song Contest. Archived from the original on 24 May 2015. Retrieved 16 November 2019.
  26. ^ "Eurosong 2016". rtcg.me (in Montenegrin). RTCG. 10 May 2016. Retrieved 16 November 2019.
  27. ^ Roxburgh, Gordon (14 May 2016). "The 42 spokespersons for the 2016 Grand Final". eurovision.tv. EBU. Archived from the original on 15 May 2016. Retrieved 16 November 2019.
  28. ^ "Eurosong 2017". rtcg.me (in Montenegrin). RTCG. 8 May 2017. Retrieved 16 November 2019.
  29. ^ Jensen, Charlotte (13 May 2017). "Voting order, spokespeople for Grand Final 2017". eurovisionary.com. Eurovisionary. Retrieved 16 November 2019.
  30. ^ "Lisabon – Evrovizija 2018". rtcg.me (in Montenegrin). RTCG. 9 May 2018. Retrieved 16 November 2019.
  31. ^ "May we have your votes please?". eurovision.tv. EBU. 11 May 2018. Retrieved 16 November 2019.
  32. ^ "Tel Aviv – Evrovizija 2019". rtcg.me (in Montenegrin). RTCG. 14 May 2019. Archived from the original on 14 May 2019. Retrieved 16 November 2019.
  33. ^ "Eurovision 2019 Spokespersons – Who will announce the points?". eurovisionworld.com. 18 May 2019. Retrieved 16 November 2019.