Montmorency Falls

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Montmorency Falls
Montmorency Falls 01.jpg
Montmorency Falls in the summer.
LocationQuebec City, Quebec, Canada
Coordinates46°53′27″N 71°8′51″W / 46.89083°N 71.14750°W / 46.89083; -71.14750Coordinates: 46°53′27″N 71°8′51″W / 46.89083°N 71.14750°W / 46.89083; -71.14750
TypeCataract
Total height84 m (276 ft)
Number of drops2
WatercourseMontmorency River
Average
flow rate
130 m3/s (4,600 cu ft/s)[1][2]

The Montmorency Falls (French: Chute Montmorency) is a large waterfall on the Montmorency River in Quebec, Canada.[3]

Location[edit]

The falls are located on the boundary between the borough of Beauport, and Boischatel, about 12 km (7.5 mi) from the heart of old Quebec City. The area surrounding the falls is protected within the Montmorency Falls Park (French: Parc de la Chute-Montmorency). The falls are at the mouth of the Montmorency River where it drops over the cliff shore into the Saint Lawrence River, opposite the western end of the Île d'Orleans. The waterfalls are 83 m (272') tall, a full 30 m (99') higher than Niagara Falls.[4]

Access and tourism[edit]

There are staircases that allow visitors to view the falls from several different perspectives. A suspension bridge over the crest of the falls provides access to both sides of the park. There is also a funitel that carries passengers between the base and the top of the falls. In the summer the park hosts an international fireworks competition with the falls as a backdrop.[5]

During summer months, the falls give off a yellow glow due to high iron content in the waterbed.[6]

The Ice Hotel was located at Montmorency Falls for its first year.

In popular culture[edit]

The Falls were the site of a key scene between the lead actors in the 1947 film Whispering City, which was filmed on location.[7][8]

In his poem "Sleep and Poetry" (1816), John Keats says that human life is "a poor Indian's sleep / While his boat hastens to the monstrous steep / Of Montmorency."[9] Recreational sleighing on the frozen falls is recorded in Letitia Elizabeth Landon's poem The Montmorency Waterfall and Cone of 1835.

The Falls appeared during the finale of The Amazing Race Canada 5 in 2017 and were the site of the episode's first task in which competitors scaled a cargo net suspended over the Falls.[10]

Gallery[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • Réseau Sépaq, Parc de la Chute-Montmorency Historic Site brochure, 2003.
  1. ^ "Le Portrait de Bassin Versant". Plan Directeur de l'Eau 2005 (in French). Conseil de Bassin de la Rivière Montmorency. Archived from the original on 2011-07-15. Retrieved 2010-05-27.
  2. ^ "Graphique des données à une station hydrométrique". www.cehq.gouv.qc.ca. Retrieved 2020-11-02.
  3. ^ Professor Steven Dutch, Natural and Applied Sciences, University of Wisconsin - Green Bay (19 January 2007). "Montmorency Falls, Quebec". Virtual Field Trips. Archived from the original (11500px) on 28 May 2009. Retrieved 2008-11-09.CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link) highest in the province of Quebec
  4. ^ Québec, Office du tourisme de. "Parc de la Chute-Montmorency". Official Web Site - Québec City Tourism. Retrieved 2018-07-20.
  5. ^ Fireworks at Montmorency Falls
  6. ^ "Montmorency Falls - Quebec City 101". Quebec City 101. Retrieved 2016-03-19.
  7. ^ Whispering City at IMDb
  8. ^ "Whispering City (1947)". Retrieved 2012-01-19.
  9. ^ 31. Sleep and Poetry. Keats, John. 1884. The Poetical Works of John Keats. Bartleby.com. Retrieved on 2013-07-12.
  10. ^ Yeo, Debra (2017-09-13). "One team climbs all over the others to win The Amazing Race Canada". Toronto Star. Retrieved 2020-01-27.

External links[edit]