Monument to Garibaldi (Rome)

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Monument to Garibaldi
Monumento a Garibaldi
180MonumentoGaribaldi.JPG
Monumento a Garibaldi
Monument to Garibaldi (Rome) is located in Rome
Monument to Garibaldi (Rome)
Monumento a Garibaldi within Rome
Coordinates 41°53′29″N 12°27′39″E / 41.8915°N 12.4608°E / 41.8915; 12.4608Coordinates: 41°53′29″N 12°27′39″E / 41.8915°N 12.4608°E / 41.8915; 12.4608
Location Trastevere, Italy
Monument to Garibaldi (Rome). Picture post card, 1910.

The equestrian monument dedicated to Giuseppe Garibaldi is an imposing equestrian statue placed in Rome on the highest point of the Janiculum hill on the square Piazza Garibaldi.

It was released by Emilio Gallori in 1895, and has been referred by the title "the Hero of the Two Worlds".[1]

History[edit]

The monument consists of a bronze statue portraying the hero riding a horse, which is placed on a big marble base; on each side are engraved allegorical figures of Europe and America and bas-reliefs that commemorate the landing in Marsala, the resistance of Boiada, the defence of Rome and the group of liberty. On the steps up right the monument Ettore Ferrari had created a crown, in order to remember that Garibaldi was the first Master of Italian Freemasonry. During Fascism it was replaced by fascist symbols and a copy of it was put in place only in 1943. The monument was inaugurated on September 20, 1895 by Enrico Gallori. The placement of the monument gave rise to several politic interpretations, as it was inaugurated in the period when relationships between the Kingdom of Italy and the Holy See were still suspended. The official version declared that the Hero directs his own glance to the Vatican. After the Lateran Treaty in 1929, the statue was turned to Janiculum for want of Vatican itself. A very popular Roman legend underlines that, in this way, now the horse offers its back to the Holy See. The monument has been restored by the Municipality of Rome in 1990.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "JANICULUM HILL AND TRASTEVERE WALKING TOUR". Retrieved 12 January 2013.