Moor Mother

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Moor Mother
Birth nameCamae Ayewa
Also known as
  • Moor Mother Goddess[1]
  • Camae Defstar[2]
BornAberdeen, Maryland, U.S.
OriginPhiladelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S.
GenresExperimental[3]
Occupation(s)
  • Poet
  • musician
  • activist
Years active2012–present[4]
Labels
Websitemoormother.bandcamp.com

Camae Ayewa,[5] better known by her stage name Moor Mother, is an American poet, musician, and activist from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.[6] She is one half of the collective Black Quantum Futurism along with Rasheedah Phillips.[7]

Early life[edit]

Born and raised in Aberdeen, Maryland,[8] Moor Mother grew up in a public housing project.[9] She relocated to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to study photography at the Art Institute.[10]

Career[edit]

In 2016, Moor Mother released a studio album, Fetish Bones, on Don Giovanni Records.[11] It was included on the year-end lists by Pitchfork,[12] Rolling Stone,[13] and The Wire.[14]

In 2017, she released a studio album, The Motionless Present, on The Vinyl Factory.[15] It featured collaborations with Geng, DJ Haram, Mental Jewelry, and Rasheedah Phillips.[16] In that year, she also released a collaborative EP with Mental Jewelry, titled Crime Waves, on Don Giovanni Records.[17][18]

She served as one of the guest curators at the 2018 Le Guess Who? music festival.[19][20]

Discography[edit]

Studio albums[edit]

EPs[edit]

  • Crime Waves (2017) (with Mental Jewelry)[24]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Sacher, Andrew (October 6, 2016). "Moor Mother released 'Fetish Bones,' touring with Screaming Females". BrooklynVegan. Archived from the original on November 8, 2016. Retrieved May 13, 2019.
  2. ^ Fintoni, Laurent (December 18, 2015). "Meet Camae Defstar, The Philly Activist Channelling Her City's Pain Through Music". The Fader. Archived from the original on February 23, 2016. Retrieved May 13, 2019.
  3. ^ Blais-Billie, Braudie (October 19, 2017). "Moor Mother Shares Three-Hour Piece: Listen". Pitchfork. Archived from the original on May 13, 2019. Retrieved May 13, 2019.
  4. ^ Willems, Jasper (January 17, 2017). "Distorting The Present: DiS Meets Moor Mother". Drowned in Sound. Archived from the original on January 19, 2017. Retrieved May 13, 2019.
  5. ^ Dandridge-Lemco, Ben (March 1, 2018). "Take a trip to Moor Mother's Philadelphia in this new mini-doc". The Fader. Archived from the original on June 13, 2018. Retrieved May 13, 2019.
  6. ^ Ravens, Chal (January 11, 2018). "Moor Mother review – howl of apocalyptic fury is kept to a whisper". The Guardian. Archived from the original on February 21, 2018. Retrieved May 13, 2019.
  7. ^ Duplan, Anaïs (March 14, 2017). "Moor Mother Explains Black Quantum Futurism". Vice. Archived from the original on May 13, 2019. Retrieved May 13, 2019.
  8. ^ Rachel, T. Cole (December 19, 2017). "Performance artist Moor Mother isn't afraid of confrontation". Interview. Archived from the original on May 22, 2018. Retrieved May 13, 2019.
  9. ^ Beaumont-Thomas, Ben (April 20, 2017). "Moor Mother: 'We have yet to truly understand what enslavement means'". The Guardian. Archived from the original on July 24, 2017. Retrieved May 13, 2019.
  10. ^ Pelly, Jenn (October 26, 2016). "Moor Mother: Hardcore Poet". Pitchfork. Archived from the original on December 10, 2016. Retrieved May 13, 2019.
  11. ^ Iadarola, Alexander (September 6, 2016). "Moor Mother's New Track Is a Reminder of the Agitating Power of Noise". Vice. Archived from the original on May 13, 2019. Retrieved May 13, 2019.
  12. ^ Lozano, Kevin (December 9, 2018). "The 20 Best Experimental Albums of 2016 (page 2 of 2)". Pitchfork. Archived from the original on April 3, 2017. Retrieved May 13, 2019.
  13. ^ Weingarten, Christopher R. (December 28, 2016). "20 Best Avant Albums of 2016". Rolling Stone. Archived from the original on April 11, 2019. Retrieved May 13, 2019.
  14. ^ "Listen to The Wire's Top 50 Releases of 2016". The Wire. December 26, 2016. Archived from the original on February 1, 2018. Retrieved May 13, 2019.
  15. ^ Ravens, Chal (February 21, 2017). "Moor Mother announces The Motionless Present LP featuring DJ Haram and PTP's Geng". Fact. Archived from the original on February 22, 2017. Retrieved May 13, 2019.
  16. ^ Kalev, Maya (March 22, 2017). "Moor Mother Tells The Story Behind Every Track On Her Radical New Record". The Fader. Archived from the original on April 1, 2017. Retrieved May 13, 2019.
  17. ^ Gordon, Jeremy (May 10, 2017). "Moor Mother x Mental Jewelry – "Hardware"". Spin. Archived from the original on September 8, 2018. Retrieved May 13, 2019.
  18. ^ Kelly, Kim (June 13, 2017). "Philly Producers Moor Mother and Mental Jewelry Team Up on 'Crime Waves'". Vice. Archived from the original on May 13, 2019. Retrieved May 13, 2019.
  19. ^ Welsh, April Clare (May 24, 2018). "Moor Mother, Asia Argento set to curate Le Guess Who? 2018". Fact. Archived from the original on May 27, 2018. Retrieved May 13, 2019.
  20. ^ Amin, Tayyab (December 8, 2018). "Le Guess Who? 2018: Fringe global sounds and community outreach in Utrecht". Fact. Archived from the original on December 9, 2018. Retrieved May 13, 2019.
  21. ^ Lozano, Kevin (September 29, 2016). "Moor Mother: Fetish Bones". Pitchfork. Archived from the original on March 30, 2017. Retrieved May 13, 2019.
  22. ^ Miller, Julie (February 24, 2017). "Moor Mother previews new record of poetry and soundscape with "This Week"". WXPN. Archived from the original on February 26, 2017. Retrieved May 13, 2019.
  23. ^ "Analog Fluids of Sonic Black Holes by Moor Mother on Apple Music". iTunes. Retrieved October 7, 2019.
  24. ^ Blanning, Lisa (June 14, 2017). "Moor Mother x Mental Jewelry - Crime Waves". Resident Advisor. Archived from the original on July 4, 2017. Retrieved May 13, 2019.

External links[edit]